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BUSINESS
August 2, 2009
Re: "Ukuleles strike chord online," July 25: I really liked your article on the rise of popularity for ukuleles. My aunt would entertain us for hours strumming tunes on her ukuleles on balmy summer days. The instrument also gained popularity after Jason Castro sang and played the ukulele for Israel Kamakawiwo'ole's version of "Somewhere Over the Rainbow" on "American Idol" in 2008. Catherine Mims Yamaguchi La Mirada
ARTICLES BY DATE
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 23, 2013 | By Kelly Corrigan
For Kate Friedricks, a Tujunga resident who grew up in Glendale and taught herself to play the ukulele as a girl, the instrument has become an addictive mode of expression that keeps her up at night playing song after song. All it takes, she says, is a quality ukulele and the Internet for her to put off sleep. “You get a good ukulele and you go online, and you just keep downloading all these wonderful songs, and it's midnight and you say, 'I really should have gone to bed an hour ago. But just one more.'” On the third Saturday of every month, Friedricks leads an ever-changing group of ukulele players who drive from near and far to play together, regardless of their skill level or how long they've been playing.
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OPINION
October 7, 2002
I loved your very well researched and fascinating "Ukulele Strikes a New Chord" (Oct. 1). I came back from my Hawaiian vacation this summer with a ukulele, which my teenage boys and I could not stop strumming all the way home. Every evening in Maui we were serenaded by yet another group of ukulele-strumming songsters, and I fell in love with the gentle genre. I now constantly play the CD I bought featuring the world's "biggest" star, "Iz" [Israel Kamakawiwo'ole], and his ukulele, whenever I need soothing or to just recall that Hawaiian feeling.
TRAVEL
April 21, 2013 | By Julia Flynn Siler
HONOLULU - He's known as the Woody Guthrie of Hawaiian music, a virtuoso ukulele player who's helped to introduce new generations to music that might otherwise be lost. But on the autumn morning I met up with Eddie Kamae, few people seemed to recognize the octogenarian wearing Levis and a blue work shirt. It was just after 9 a.m., and Eddie was eating a bowl of vanilla ice cream at the Wailana Coffee House in Waikiki. He had risen before sunrise to pray, read the paper and watch the sky lighten from the nearby apartment building where he and his wife, Myrna, have lived for nearly half a century.
BUSINESS
July 25, 2009 | Dan Fost
Thanks to the Internet, the humble ukulele is pushing its recent popularity well beyond anything that old-time performers Don Ho, Arthur Godfrey or even Tiny Tim could imagine. From YouTube to manufacturers' websites, from bulletin boards to iPhone and BlackBerry applications that mimic ukes and teach chords, the Internet has been stoking the craze for nearly two years and unveiling fresh talent.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 8, 1994 | AL MARTINEZ
I sing today of an ordinary man on a melancholy day, because Robert Nevel Johnson has died and something should be said about that. He died of cancer in the colorless confines of a hospital room after telling his wife, Mary, "Now I wish I could just go to sleep." This was after she promised him that with Social Security, a part-time job and help from a loving family she would make it all right financially. "It's OK to go," she said gently.
TRAVEL
April 26, 1987 | AL GOLDFARB, Goldfarb is a Los Angeles free-lance writer.
The sounds of a ukulele are as much a part of the image of Hawaii as the hula and little grass shacks. That tradition has captivated Americans from Laurel and Hardy to astronaut Scott Carpenter . . . from the days of ragtime to swing to rock. Everywhere we traveled on the islands we heard the familiar plunka-plunka-plunka-plunk accompanying lovely hula dancers and entertainers singing island songs. My wife heard about a small ukulele factory in Honolulu and suggested that we visit it.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 21, 2000
Ukulele master Jim Beloff will be the featured soloist in "Oldies but Goodies," a sing-along concert featuring songs from 1910 through the 1930s, presented by Sing! Sing! Sing! at the Jazz Bakery, 3233 Helms Ave., Culver City, on Sunday at 4 p.m. Lyrics will be provided. Admission is $15. Information: (310) 271-9039 or (310) 546-5470.
MAGAZINE
January 13, 2002 | ANDREW VONTZ
The ukulele was the furthest thing from Steve Salardino's mind as he whipped his long hair around in the '80s to the goat-slaying sounds of Brit-metal avatars such as Iron Maiden and Judas Priest. But during a protracted period of unemployment in 1994, he was given a toy ukulele by his friend Eddy French. The pair would pass afternoons on French's porch with Salardino on uke and French slinging the banjo. "It gave me a way to express myself that was simple," Salardino says. "And small.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 6, 2011
BOOKS Meghan Daum L.A. Times columnist Meghan Daum will moderate a panel about fiction and narrative nonfiction at Skylight Books. Those answering the questions are local memoirists and novelists James Brown ("This River"), Seth Greenland ("Shining City"), Diana Wagman ("Spontaneous") and Leslie Schwartz ("Angels Crest"). The discussion is sure to be lively and timely. Skylight Books, 1818 N. Vermont Ave., L.A. 7:30 p.m. Free. (323) 660-1175; skylightbooks.com . EVENTS LA Comedy Fest 365 This year-round comedy series highlighting up-and-coming comedians and filmmakers presents two shows by local improv groups: the trio Circle One and the colorfully named Yellow-Bellied Marmots.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 2, 2013 | By Marcia Adair
DORTMUND, Germany - At 5:30 p.m. backstage at a concert hall here a few weeks ago, a security guard delivers a small brown bag from a chocolate shop in Paris. Devouring the contents is not a folk-rock pixie and her gang of bearded sidemen but eight mostly middle-aged ukulele players. Still, they are rock stars of a certain kind. In 21/2 hours, 1,500 Germans of all ages and social classes will lose their minds when the Ukulele Orchestra of Great Britain takes the stage. It's not just the Germans.
NEWS
January 25, 2013 | By Jay Jones
The ukulele takes center stage Feb. 9 and 10 at the Ukulele Picnic Weekend in Honolulu. There will be music competitions, a benefit concert and (of course) a picnic. The activities kick off Saturday morning with the International Ukulele Contest at the Hyatt Regency Waikiki Beach Resort . From 11 a.m. to 2 p.m., musicians in three categories will strum their small, guitar-like instruments. The public is welcome and admission is free. From 5:30 to 9 p.m. that day, a benefit concert will be held on the great lawn of the Hilton Hawaiian Village . The evening will features a lineup of Hawaiian and Japanese entertainers, headlined by BEGIN , a pop-music group from Okinawa.
BUSINESS
January 23, 2012 | By Tiffany Hsu
Warren Buffett, ukulele-strumming folk singer? The billionaire investor debuted his musical chops just in time for the Year of the Dragon, performing “I've Been Working on the Railroad” for a Chinese television station on the first day of the Lunar New Year. In the clip, the Oracle of Omaha is clad in a simple sweater and backed by a large model railroad set as he croons in a slighty gruff voice. At the end of his set, the Berkshire Hathaway chairman waves and says “xie xie,” or “thank you” in Mandarin.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 6, 2011 | By Claire Noland, Los Angeles Times
Bill Tapia, a virtuoso ukulele player from Hawaii who learned to strum the instrument at age 7, performed for U.S. troops during World War I and was still touring and teaching well after hitting the century mark, has died. He was 103. Tapia died in his sleep Friday at his home in Westminster, said his booking agent, Mark Taylor. Tapia was born in Honolulu on New Year's Day in 1908. As a child he heard musicians playing at a neighbor's house and became fascinated by the size and sound of the ukulele, which had been introduced to the Hawaiian islands by Portuguese immigrants in the late 19th century.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 6, 2011
BOOKS Meghan Daum L.A. Times columnist Meghan Daum will moderate a panel about fiction and narrative nonfiction at Skylight Books. Those answering the questions are local memoirists and novelists James Brown ("This River"), Seth Greenland ("Shining City"), Diana Wagman ("Spontaneous") and Leslie Schwartz ("Angels Crest"). The discussion is sure to be lively and timely. Skylight Books, 1818 N. Vermont Ave., L.A. 7:30 p.m. Free. (323) 660-1175; skylightbooks.com . EVENTS LA Comedy Fest 365 This year-round comedy series highlighting up-and-coming comedians and filmmakers presents two shows by local improv groups: the trio Circle One and the colorfully named Yellow-Bellied Marmots.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 24, 2010 | By Daiana Feuer, Special to the Los Angeles Times
A few months ago at a Venice Beach party called the Seventh Chakra Purple Party, the directive on the invitation was simple: "Wear purple and come with an open mind!" Inside the upscale house, the most mind-opening part was a rather explicit makeshift museum celebrating the female anatomy. Outside, New Age types in their 30s and 40s mingled flirtatiously around a lavish yard featuring a trickling Zen waterfall, floor pillows and artificial grass. Most guests, however, were crammed in the backhouse, where they cheered ukulele cover band the Ooks of Hazzard as the nine musicians headed toward a "Purple Rain" finale.
NEWS
January 25, 2013 | By Jay Jones
The ukulele takes center stage Feb. 9 and 10 at the Ukulele Picnic Weekend in Honolulu. There will be music competitions, a benefit concert and (of course) a picnic. The activities kick off Saturday morning with the International Ukulele Contest at the Hyatt Regency Waikiki Beach Resort . From 11 a.m. to 2 p.m., musicians in three categories will strum their small, guitar-like instruments. The public is welcome and admission is free. From 5:30 to 9 p.m. that day, a benefit concert will be held on the great lawn of the Hilton Hawaiian Village . The evening will features a lineup of Hawaiian and Japanese entertainers, headlined by BEGIN , a pop-music group from Okinawa.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 24, 2010 | By Daiana Feuer, Special to the Los Angeles Times
A few months ago at a Venice Beach party called the Seventh Chakra Purple Party, the directive on the invitation was simple: "Wear purple and come with an open mind!" Inside the upscale house, the most mind-opening part was a rather explicit makeshift museum celebrating the female anatomy. Outside, New Age types in their 30s and 40s mingled flirtatiously around a lavish yard featuring a trickling Zen waterfall, floor pillows and artificial grass. Most guests, however, were crammed in the backhouse, where they cheered ukulele cover band the Ooks of Hazzard as the nine musicians headed toward a "Purple Rain" finale.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 14, 2010
Elaine Koster Publisher with a knack for new talent Elaine Koster, 69, a publisher and literary agent with a knack for new talent who gave a second chance to an obscure horror writer named Stephen King and took on an unknown Khaled Hosseini and his novel "The Kite Runner," died Tuesday at St. Luke's Hospital in New York, according to Hosseini's publisher, Penguin Group (USA). The cause of death was not available. As publisher of the New American Library in the 1970s, Koster paid a then-enormous $400,000 for the paperback rights to King's "Carrie," which had sold poorly in hardcover, and was later credited with helping to make a blockbuster out of Erica Jong's "Fear of Flying.
BUSINESS
August 2, 2009
Re: "Ukuleles strike chord online," July 25: I really liked your article on the rise of popularity for ukuleles. My aunt would entertain us for hours strumming tunes on her ukuleles on balmy summer days. The instrument also gained popularity after Jason Castro sang and played the ukulele for Israel Kamakawiwo'ole's version of "Somewhere Over the Rainbow" on "American Idol" in 2008. Catherine Mims Yamaguchi La Mirada
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