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Ulan Bator

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 30, 1987
More than seven centuries ago the Mongol armies of Genghis Khan and his successors began a remarkable and brutal era of conquest that took them first into northern China and ultimately as far west as Poland and Hungary. In the course of these excursions they defeated the knights of Germany, sacked Moscow, forcibly deposited their genetic imprint across a good part of Eastern Europe, and overall made their name a byword for terror and pillage.
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TRAVEL
January 4, 2014 | Los Angeles Times
SAFETY Workshop Experts will offer tips on how to access local avalanche bulletins and weather reports, recognize basic signs of avalanche danger and learn simple ways to help avoid it. When, where: 7 p.m. Wednesday at the REI store in Northridge, 18605 Devonshire St.; and 7 p.m. Thursday at the Tustin store, 2962 El Camino Real. Admission, info: Free. (818) 831-5555 for Northridge; (714) 505-0205 for Tustin. MONGOLIA Presentation Tom Getz will present a digital slide show featuring Ulan Bator, Mongolia's capital, the steppes and the Gobi Desert.
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NEWS
August 17, 2012 | By Leon Logothetis
“Never drive faster than your guardian angel can fly.” --Author unknown I am within spitting distance of the end of the Mongol Rally , this 10,000-mile road trip adventure that began July 14 in Britain and, with luck, will end in Ulan Bator , Mongolia . After five weeks of grueling driving I can taste the glory. But before I start celebrating--even though we may be as close as 60 miles from the endpoint--I remind myself that many teams have not made it. Car troubles.
NEWS
August 17, 2012 | By Leon Logothetis
“If you can find a path with no obstacles, it probably doesn't lead anywhere.” --Frank A. Clark As Steve Priovolos and I started our final drive into Ulan Bator, Mongolia, I was again reminded why the Mongol Rally , the 10,000-mile road trip that began July 14 in Britain and ends here, is not for the faint of heart. The terrain and the sheer magnitude of the task unfolded every day before our eyes. If it's not corrupt policemen trying to hamper the journey, it's the potholed roads.
NEWS
April 5, 1990 | DAVID HOLLEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
At a railway station southeast of this Mongolian capital, passengers on the Beijing-Moscow express recently caught a brief glimpse of flatbed railway cars loaded with Soviet tanks. There seemed to be little doubt that the tanks were headed back to Soviet territory, part of a military withdrawal from this landlocked Central Asian nation.
NEWS
June 16, 1991 | KATHY WILHELM, ASSOCIATED PRESS
One year after its peaceful transformation from Communist dictatorship to multiparty democracy, Mongolia is struggling for economic survival. Collapse of the old central planning system and the abrupt end of Soviet aid have brought the remote Central Asian nation to the brink of bankruptcy. Stocks of fuel, hard currency and staple foods are low or nearly gone. Power failures are frequent in Ulan Bator.
NEWS
August 17, 2012 | By Leon Logothetis
“If you can find a path with no obstacles, it probably doesn't lead anywhere.” --Frank A. Clark As Steve Priovolos and I started our final drive into Ulan Bator, Mongolia, I was again reminded why the Mongol Rally , the 10,000-mile road trip that began July 14 in Britain and ends here, is not for the faint of heart. The terrain and the sheer magnitude of the task unfolded every day before our eyes. If it's not corrupt policemen trying to hamper the journey, it's the potholed roads.
TRAVEL
January 4, 2014 | Los Angeles Times
SAFETY Workshop Experts will offer tips on how to access local avalanche bulletins and weather reports, recognize basic signs of avalanche danger and learn simple ways to help avoid it. When, where: 7 p.m. Wednesday at the REI store in Northridge, 18605 Devonshire St.; and 7 p.m. Thursday at the Tustin store, 2962 El Camino Real. Admission, info: Free. (818) 831-5555 for Northridge; (714) 505-0205 for Tustin. MONGOLIA Presentation Tom Getz will present a digital slide show featuring Ulan Bator, Mongolia's capital, the steppes and the Gobi Desert.
NEWS
July 1, 1990 | KATHY WILHELM, ASSOCIATED PRESS
The music takes on a Latin beat. The dancers glue their bodies together. They are doing--yes, the lambada, the provocative Brazilian dance that is the rage in the West. The lambada? In Ulan Bator? In Mongolia? "Why not?" said Suhjargalmaa, a top editor at the official Montsame News Agency. "We knew about the Beatles as soon as they appeared."
NEWS
August 20, 1987 | MICHAEL BLUMFIELD, Times Staff Writer
It's August. Do you know where your congressman is? If he's Rep. Henry A. Waxman (D-Los Angeles), you most likely don't know, and he wants to keep it that way. Waxman has joined an unspecified number of members of the House Select Committee on Narcotics Abuse and Control who are on a European and African study of drug trafficking said to be so dangerous that their itinerary is being kept secret to lessen the hazards to the congressmen.
NEWS
August 17, 2012 | By Leon Logothetis
“Never drive faster than your guardian angel can fly.” --Author unknown I am within spitting distance of the end of the Mongol Rally , this 10,000-mile road trip adventure that began July 14 in Britain and, with luck, will end in Ulan Bator , Mongolia . After five weeks of grueling driving I can taste the glory. But before I start celebrating--even though we may be as close as 60 miles from the endpoint--I remind myself that many teams have not made it. Car troubles.
NEWS
July 28, 2012 | By Leon Logothetis
What this world needs is a new kind of army - the army of the kind. --Cleveland Amory About 1,100 miles ago we were  on the outskirts of Volgograd, Russia. When we stopped for gas I noticed a shiny object protruding from my back right tire. On closer inspection, I realized a nail had punctured the tire. After consulting with Steve Privolos, my co-driver on the 10,000-mile road trip from Britain to Ulan Bator, Mongolia ,  known as the Mongol Rally , we decided we would keep the nail and keep driving.
NEWS
July 15, 2012 | By Leon Logothetis, Special to The Times
"Books can be dangerous. The best ones should be labeled 'This could change your life.'"  -- Helen Exley By a twist of fate, I eventually made it to my rendezvous with the Channel Tunnel on Saturday at the start of the 10,000-mile Mongol Rally, a road trip that will take me through 18 countries on the way to Ulan Bator, Mongolia, in a tiny, tiny car. The weather gods were on my side: The English rain caused a two-hour delay, but this...
NEWS
July 13, 2012 | By Catharine M. Hamm, Los Angeles Times Travel editor
But why? Why would you want to drive from Britain to Mongolia in a tiny car through the sometimes-hostile terrain of 18 countries where you're almost guaranteed to encounter some sort of trouble? Especially when that trouble could include death, quite possibly your own? And why, if you've tried it once and nearly got killed, would you want to do it again? To encourage reading, of course. We don't mean reading of this blog, although that's nice too. We mean reading for children who may not have access to books.
WORLD
June 24, 2012 | By Jonathan Kaiman, Los Angeles Times
ULAN BATOR, Mongolia - The man who was once the most powerful person in Mongolia lies in a hospital bed recovering from a hunger strike, the late afternoon sun falling across his sunken face. Mongolia's parliamentary elections are scheduled Thursday, but former President Nambaryn Enkhbayar will not be on the ballot. He is being tried on five counts of corruption, a case he charges was engineered by the current president. "The present authorities are scared of me," he said in fluent English, his voice grave.
NEWS
September 5, 2011 | By Leon Logothetis, Special to the Los Angeles Times
“Far better is it to dare mighty things, to win glorious triumphs, even though checkered by failure... than to rank with those poor spirits who neither enjoy nor suffer much, because they live in a gray twilight that knows not victory nor defeat.” --Theodore Roosevelt   In those moments when things happen - really bad things - we have a choice: Do we feel sorry for ourselves? Or do we grab the opportunity to reflect and grow? I wish I could say I was immediately in that latter category, but I spent some time in the former.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 11, 2010 | By Nomi Morris, Special to the Los Angeles Times
In the crimson-painted interior of a monastery in central Mongolia, boys as young as 6 face one another cross-legged on benches and chant Tibetan Buddhist prayers that they barely understand. Some fidget and get up every now and then to ladle bowls of fermented horse milk from a large metal vat. Their teachers occasionally call out directions. The boys are at a three-month religious camp at the monastery, Shand Khiid. The oldest monk in residence is 97. A visiting sage from Tibet relaxes in a back room, watching sports on television.
NEWS
July 28, 2012 | By Leon Logothetis
What this world needs is a new kind of army - the army of the kind. --Cleveland Amory About 1,100 miles ago we were  on the outskirts of Volgograd, Russia. When we stopped for gas I noticed a shiny object protruding from my back right tire. On closer inspection, I realized a nail had punctured the tire. After consulting with Steve Privolos, my co-driver on the 10,000-mile road trip from Britain to Ulan Bator, Mongolia ,  known as the Mongol Rally , we decided we would keep the nail and keep driving.
NEWS
August 22, 2011 | By Michael A. Memoli
Reporting from Ulan Bator, Mongolia -- He got a horse. But he could have had a yak. Vice President Joe Biden made the most of a brief visit to Mongolia on Monday, touting the fledgling democracy's future potential in meetings with its leadership before witnessing a fantastic demonstration of the nation's most popular sports and cultural offerings. There was a contortionist, a wrestling tournament and archery demonstration. But the star of the show at the “Mini-Naadam” festival put on to honor Biden's visit: a handsome, if badly behaved brown horse presented as a gift to the vice president from the Mongolian people.
NEWS
August 2, 2011 | By Leon Logothetis, Special to the Los Angeles Times
“What fates impose, that men must needs abide: it boots not to resist both wind and tide” William Shakespeare It is with acute sadness that I write this. Steven Priovolos, my friend and cameraman, and I had about a 625-mile drive from Budapest, Hungary, to the capital of Moldova, Chisinau, on the next leg of the Mongol Rally, the 10,000-mile road trip from Britain to Mongolia. After 12 hours on the road, we found ourselves in the leafy Romanian town of Campulung Moldovenesc .
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