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Ulcerative Colitis

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NEWS
December 1, 2010 | By Thomas H. Maugh II, Los Angeles Times
A 34-year-old Northern California man with ulcerative colitis who decided to treat himself by swallowing parasitic worms has provided new information about how the worms might help to soothe and heal a variety of intestinal inflammations, researchers reported Wednesday. A growing body of evidence suggests that several different types of parasitic worms might be useful in treating such disorders, but there has been little evidence about how the worms might bring about positive changes. By allowing doctors to monitor changes in his immune system following ingestion of the worms, the man has provided the first clues about that mechanism.
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NEWS
November 1, 2012 | By Rosie Mestel, Los Angeles Times
Inflammatory bowel disease -- a range of conditions including Crohn's disease and ulcerative colitis -- afflicts an estimated 1.4 million Americans.  Now some scientists in France have come up with a  novel potential therapy: an enzyme that calms down the gut delivered via a genetically engineered bacterium. The approach -- tested so far only on mice and pieces of inflamed human gut tissue in the lab -- was reported in a paper in this week's Science Translational Medicine . Crohn's and ulcerative colitis, which range in severity and can be chronic or recurring, develop when parts of the body's immune system turn traitor  and -- for poorly understood reasons -- start attacking the gut.  Symptoms include diarrhea, cramping, weight loss, ulcers and intestinal scarring.
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NEWS
August 24, 2011 | By Jeannine Stein, Los Angeles Times / For the Booster Shots blog
Casey Abrams wowed audiences on Season 10 of "American Idol" with his unique bluesy singing style. But his talent was briefly overshadowed when he was hospitalized during the show for complications of ulcerative colitis, a condition he was diagnosed with in college, but hadn't publicly revealed. Looking back now, Abrams says the episode was a blessing in disguise. "When I read on TMZ that I was in the hospital I thought, I guess I have to talk about it now. It was a good kick in the butt to get it out there.
SCIENCE
June 8, 2012 | By Thomas H. Maugh II
Bacteria in the gut play a crucial role in human health, and imbalances in bacterial populations can contribute to many disorders. New research suggests that fungi, though not as common in the intestines as bacteria, may also play a role in causing and modulating disease. The results could lead to new treatments for conditions such as inflammatory bowel disease, ulcerative colitis and Crohn's disease. An estimated 1.4 million Americans have some form of inflammatory bowel disease, which can cause inflammation, ulcers in the bowel, abdominal pain, diarrhea, bleeding, fatigue, weight loss and loss of appetite.
SCIENCE
June 8, 2012 | By Thomas H. Maugh II
Bacteria in the gut play a crucial role in human health, and imbalances in bacterial populations can contribute to many disorders. New research suggests that fungi, though not as common in the intestines as bacteria, may also play a role in causing and modulating disease. The results could lead to new treatments for conditions such as inflammatory bowel disease, ulcerative colitis and Crohn's disease. An estimated 1.4 million Americans have some form of inflammatory bowel disease, which can cause inflammation, ulcers in the bowel, abdominal pain, diarrhea, bleeding, fatigue, weight loss and loss of appetite.
NEWS
October 30, 1985
A surgeon has been given approval to simultaneously transplant six organs--a liver, stomach, large and small intestine, pancreas and spleen--into a man at Presbyterian-University Hospital in Pittsburgh. Awaiting the surgery is Herbert G. Seal, 36, of Pekin, Ind. Four years ago, Seal, who initially suffered from ulcerative colitis, had all but six inches of his intestines removed in two operations. Since then, he has been fed intravenously. Over the years, his other organs have begun to fail.
NEWS
November 1, 2012 | By Rosie Mestel, Los Angeles Times
Inflammatory bowel disease -- a range of conditions including Crohn's disease and ulcerative colitis -- afflicts an estimated 1.4 million Americans.  Now some scientists in France have come up with a  novel potential therapy: an enzyme that calms down the gut delivered via a genetically engineered bacterium. The approach -- tested so far only on mice and pieces of inflamed human gut tissue in the lab -- was reported in a paper in this week's Science Translational Medicine . Crohn's and ulcerative colitis, which range in severity and can be chronic or recurring, develop when parts of the body's immune system turn traitor  and -- for poorly understood reasons -- start attacking the gut.  Symptoms include diarrhea, cramping, weight loss, ulcers and intestinal scarring.
HEALTH
August 28, 2006 | Peter Ubel, Special to The Times
Despite a host of medicines, the man continued to suffer. His severe ulcerative colitis, an inflammatory condition of the large intestine, caused bloody diarrhea and crampy abdominal pain, and he rarely slept through the night without having to wake up to race to the bathroom. Realizing that his medicines weren't up to the task, I spoke with him about another treatment option.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 20, 1994 | ED BOND
For three years, doctors were stumped. At first, they told Valerie Krasner that her daughter was anorexic. Then, they thought it was some type of cancer, then a blood disorder. "They went through all kinds of testing," said Krasner, a Woodland Hills resident whose 26-year-old daughter has had Crohn's disease for 11 years. The little-known disease causes the intestines to narrow to the point that food digestion becomes painful.
NEWS
August 3, 1993 | MARLENE CIMONS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Pursuing a new avenue of drug industry enforcement, the Food and Drug Administration and the Justice Department announced Monday that they have taken legal action against a pharmaceutical company for promoting a drug for unapproved uses solely to increase its sales. Kabi Pharmacia Inc., of Piscataway, N.J.
NEWS
August 24, 2011 | By Jeannine Stein, Los Angeles Times / For the Booster Shots blog
Casey Abrams wowed audiences on Season 10 of "American Idol" with his unique bluesy singing style. But his talent was briefly overshadowed when he was hospitalized during the show for complications of ulcerative colitis, a condition he was diagnosed with in college, but hadn't publicly revealed. Looking back now, Abrams says the episode was a blessing in disguise. "When I read on TMZ that I was in the hospital I thought, I guess I have to talk about it now. It was a good kick in the butt to get it out there.
NEWS
December 1, 2010 | By Thomas H. Maugh II, Los Angeles Times
A 34-year-old Northern California man with ulcerative colitis who decided to treat himself by swallowing parasitic worms has provided new information about how the worms might help to soothe and heal a variety of intestinal inflammations, researchers reported Wednesday. A growing body of evidence suggests that several different types of parasitic worms might be useful in treating such disorders, but there has been little evidence about how the worms might bring about positive changes. By allowing doctors to monitor changes in his immune system following ingestion of the worms, the man has provided the first clues about that mechanism.
HEALTH
August 28, 2006 | Peter Ubel, Special to The Times
Despite a host of medicines, the man continued to suffer. His severe ulcerative colitis, an inflammatory condition of the large intestine, caused bloody diarrhea and crampy abdominal pain, and he rarely slept through the night without having to wake up to race to the bathroom. Realizing that his medicines weren't up to the task, I spoke with him about another treatment option.
SCIENCE
October 4, 2005 | Thomas H. Maugh II, Times Staff Writer
Two Australian researchers who discovered that stomach ulcers are caused by a bacterium, not by emotional stress or spicy foods, were awarded the 2005 Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine on Monday. Dr. J. Robin Warren, 68, and Dr. Barry J. Marshall, 54, overturned the belief held by physicians for decades by isolating a spiral-shaped bacterium called Helicobacter pylori from humans and ultimately demonstrating that it could produce serious lesions in the stomach.
HEALTH
May 10, 2004 | Linda Marsa, Special to The Times
"EAT worms" may be more than a childhood taunt hurled at enemies on the playground. It also may be good advice. Some scientists believe that swallowing a concoction of certain parasites may relieve the often-debilitating symptoms of Crohn's disease and ulcerative colitis, the two most common inflammatory bowel disorders. Irritable bowel disorders affect an estimated 1 million to 2 million Americans.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 20, 1994 | ED BOND
For three years, doctors were stumped. At first, they told Valerie Krasner that her daughter was anorexic. Then, they thought it was some type of cancer, then a blood disorder. "They went through all kinds of testing," said Krasner, a Woodland Hills resident whose 26-year-old daughter has had Crohn's disease for 11 years. The little-known disease causes the intestines to narrow to the point that food digestion becomes painful.
SCIENCE
October 4, 2005 | Thomas H. Maugh II, Times Staff Writer
Two Australian researchers who discovered that stomach ulcers are caused by a bacterium, not by emotional stress or spicy foods, were awarded the 2005 Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine on Monday. Dr. J. Robin Warren, 68, and Dr. Barry J. Marshall, 54, overturned the belief held by physicians for decades by isolating a spiral-shaped bacterium called Helicobacter pylori from humans and ultimately demonstrating that it could produce serious lesions in the stomach.
NEWS
August 3, 1993 | MARLENE CIMONS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Pursuing a new avenue of drug industry enforcement, the Food and Drug Administration and the Justice Department announced Monday that they have taken legal action against a pharmaceutical company for promoting a drug for unapproved uses solely to increase its sales. Kabi Pharmacia Inc., of Piscataway, N.J.
NEWS
March 19, 1987
Although the benefits of giving up smoking are well known, doctors believe they have identified the first apparent health hazard of kicking the habit, an increased risk of a rare but serious intestinal disease called ulcerative colitis. Their research also confirms that people who continue to smoke have a somewhat lower risk of the disease than do those who never smoked. Dr. Edward J.
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