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ENTERTAINMENT
April 1, 2013 | By Carolyn Kellogg
Join David L. Ulin and author and artist Ben Katchor at 10 a.m. Tuesday for a live video chat about the art of storytelling and cities, real and imagined. Katchor is a visionary comic artist, a MacArthur "Genius" fellow who has made urban landscapes part of his subject. "Born in 1951, he makes comics that bristle with an off-kilter melancholy reminiscent of New York in the 1970s, a city in decline but also oddly full of life," Ulin wrote in a review of his latest collection.
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ENTERTAINMENT
March 17, 2014 | By Carolyn Kellogg
Many Angelenos were shaken awake at 6:25 a.m. Monday by a 4.4 magnitude earthquake centered north of Westwood. As earthquakes go, it wasn't really so bad: As of this writing, no major damage or injuries have been reported, water and power systems seem to be intact across the city, and, well, it was time to get up anyway. It was literally a wake-up call for earthquake preparedness. We're all supposed to have earthquake kits stocked with water and canned goods and first-aid supplies, just in case.
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ENTERTAINMENT
June 2, 2013 | By David L. Ulin, Los Angeles Times Book Critic
Summer is my favorite season - always has been. Partly, it's the light: slow and thick, like a glaze of honey spread across the world. Partly, it's the heat, which I feel in my joints, making me imagine I was loose-limbed again. But more than anything, it's the feeling of space, of the moment expanding, the faith that, during these three months, I might do anything. That's an adolescent's faith, to be sure, but it has lingered, as if there might be (to borrow a phrase from a favorite episode of "The Twilight Zone")
ENTERTAINMENT
December 19, 2013 | By David L. Ulin, Los Angeles Times Book Critic
Toward the end of September, I found myself in a meeting room at Brooklyn Borough Hall in New York with planners from a variety of book fairs (Miami, Trinidad, Texas, Australia) discussing audience and cooperation and outreach. It was the morning after the Brooklyn Book Festival, which had drawn tens of thousands, and the atmosphere was upbeat, marked by excitement, even relief. Economics remained an issue (how to attract and pay for writers, how to advertise and promote) but there was no lamenting, no sense that things might be shutting down.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 17, 2014 | By Carolyn Kellogg
Many Angelenos were shaken awake at 6:25 a.m. Monday by a 4.4 magnitude earthquake centered north of Westwood. As earthquakes go, it wasn't really so bad: As of this writing, no major damage or injuries have been reported, water and power systems seem to be intact across the city, and, well, it was time to get up anyway. It was literally a wake-up call for earthquake preparedness. We're all supposed to have earthquake kits stocked with water and canned goods and first-aid supplies, just in case.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 14, 2013 | By Carolyn Kellogg
Little, Brown confirmed Sunday that "The Cuckoo's Calling," a well-reviewed crime novel, was secretly written by Harry Potter author J.K. Rowling. The book was written under the pseudonym Robert Galbraith. Another book using that pen name is coming next year. "The Cuckoo's Calling" was published by Little, Brown imprint Mulholland Books on April 30. “A reprint of the book is under way and will carry a revised author biography, which reads, 'Robert Galbraith is a pseudonym for J.K. Rowling,' ” Reagan Arthur, publisher of Little, Brown, said in a statement.  Little, Brown confirmed Rowling's authorship of the book after the Sunday Times of London revealed  the secret.
TRAVEL
May 2, 2010
On the heels of Holden Caulfield You did it! Bested the New York Times for the most interesting article of the weekend. I take both papers and am usually drawn to the N.Y. Times, but not this time. Ulin's retracing of Holden's inner and outer journey led to me retracing mine. What better job can a writer do? -- Ashby Jones, Tustin Walking in Holden Caulfield's footsteps through Manhattan is an inspired piece of writing. I also am from New York. Although I never lived in Manhattan, reading Ulin's narrative made me acutely homesick for Midtown in the '50s, but most of all for the soul of Manhattan.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 22, 2013 | By Carolyn Kellogg
Lydia Davis, known for writing powerful, compact short stories, was announced as the winner of the Man Booker International Prize for fiction Wednesday. The prize, which was presented at a ceremony in London, comes with an award worth more than $90,000. "Lydia Davis' writings fling their lithe arms wide to embrace many a kind. Just how to categorize them?" Sir Christopher Ricks, the chair of the judging panel, said while giving the award. "Should we simply concur with the official title and dub them stories?
ENTERTAINMENT
December 19, 2013 | By David L. Ulin, Los Angeles Times Book Critic
Toward the end of September, I found myself in a meeting room at Brooklyn Borough Hall in New York with planners from a variety of book fairs (Miami, Trinidad, Texas, Australia) discussing audience and cooperation and outreach. It was the morning after the Brooklyn Book Festival, which had drawn tens of thousands, and the atmosphere was upbeat, marked by excitement, even relief. Economics remained an issue (how to attract and pay for writers, how to advertise and promote) but there was no lamenting, no sense that things might be shutting down.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 31, 2013 | By Carolyn Kellogg
If you're planning to hit the beach -- or mountains or woods or backyard patio -- don't forget to bring along a book or two. In our list of 156 summer book picks, you'll find thrillers and young adult books, science books and novels, memoirs and science fiction, books about pop culture and just for kids. There's really something for everyone. A special summer books pull-out tablet -- online here -- appears in the L.A. Times print edition on Sunday. It includes an essay from book critic David L. Ulin, in which he contemplates the luxury of time the summer affords us to read -- a luxury that may be more imaginary than real.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 12, 2013 | By David L. Ulin, Los Angeles Times Book Critic
Fall is a terrific time to be a reader. Publishers shake off their summer doldrums and get down to business again. And writers? Well, writers settle in also and put out big books. Over the next few months alone, we'll see new releases from an array of authors: Dave Eggers, Dana Goodyear, Elizabeth Gilbert and Donna Tartt among them. There are so many new titles that it's impossible to keep track of them. As to what we are to make of this, I choose to find it reassuring, a reminder that, despite the vagaries of the industry, the fundamentals haven't changed.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 14, 2013 | By Carolyn Kellogg
Little, Brown confirmed Sunday that "The Cuckoo's Calling," a well-reviewed crime novel, was secretly written by Harry Potter author J.K. Rowling. The book was written under the pseudonym Robert Galbraith. Another book using that pen name is coming next year. "The Cuckoo's Calling" was published by Little, Brown imprint Mulholland Books on April 30. “A reprint of the book is under way and will carry a revised author biography, which reads, 'Robert Galbraith is a pseudonym for J.K. Rowling,' ” Reagan Arthur, publisher of Little, Brown, said in a statement.  Little, Brown confirmed Rowling's authorship of the book after the Sunday Times of London revealed  the secret.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 27, 2013 | By Carolyn Kellogg
Last week there was a hubbub over a Kickstarter campaign to fund a "seduction" guidebook that included passages that encouraged men to be assertive with women. "Don't ask for permission. Be dominant. Force her to rebuff your advances," and other amateur advice justifiably set off alarm bells. Yet the furious attention that followed backfired -- the small, self-published book got funded eight times over. Can literary projects on Kickstarter that aren't offensive do the same? One that might  is for a 25-minute film adaptation of the story "Oblivion" by David Foster Wallace (watch the video above)
ENTERTAINMENT
June 2, 2013 | By David L. Ulin, Los Angeles Times Book Critic
Summer is my favorite season - always has been. Partly, it's the light: slow and thick, like a glaze of honey spread across the world. Partly, it's the heat, which I feel in my joints, making me imagine I was loose-limbed again. But more than anything, it's the feeling of space, of the moment expanding, the faith that, during these three months, I might do anything. That's an adolescent's faith, to be sure, but it has lingered, as if there might be (to borrow a phrase from a favorite episode of "The Twilight Zone")
ENTERTAINMENT
May 31, 2013 | By Carolyn Kellogg
If you're planning to hit the beach -- or mountains or woods or backyard patio -- don't forget to bring along a book or two. In our list of 156 summer book picks, you'll find thrillers and young adult books, science books and novels, memoirs and science fiction, books about pop culture and just for kids. There's really something for everyone. A special summer books pull-out tablet -- online here -- appears in the L.A. Times print edition on Sunday. It includes an essay from book critic David L. Ulin, in which he contemplates the luxury of time the summer affords us to read -- a luxury that may be more imaginary than real.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 22, 2013 | By Carolyn Kellogg
Lydia Davis, known for writing powerful, compact short stories, was announced as the winner of the Man Booker International Prize for fiction Wednesday. The prize, which was presented at a ceremony in London, comes with an award worth more than $90,000. "Lydia Davis' writings fling their lithe arms wide to embrace many a kind. Just how to categorize them?" Sir Christopher Ricks, the chair of the judging panel, said while giving the award. "Should we simply concur with the official title and dub them stories?
ENTERTAINMENT
June 27, 2013 | By Carolyn Kellogg
Last week there was a hubbub over a Kickstarter campaign to fund a "seduction" guidebook that included passages that encouraged men to be assertive with women. "Don't ask for permission. Be dominant. Force her to rebuff your advances," and other amateur advice justifiably set off alarm bells. Yet the furious attention that followed backfired -- the small, self-published book got funded eight times over. Can literary projects on Kickstarter that aren't offensive do the same? One that might  is for a 25-minute film adaptation of the story "Oblivion" by David Foster Wallace (watch the video above)
ENTERTAINMENT
October 31, 2010
The following is excerpted from Los Angeles Times book critic David L. Ulin's "The Lost Art of Reading: Why Books Matter in a Distracted Time" (Sasquatch: 152 pp., $12.95), which comes out Nov. 1. The book grew out of an essay that appeared in The Times in August 2009; you can read the original piece online at URL TK . Since the moment I discovered literature, I've surrounded myself with books; every room, office, or apartment I've ever occupied has been had its walls, floors, tables, nearly all available surfaces, covered with the effluvia of print.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 12, 2013 | By Carolyn Kellogg
  On Tuesday, join L.A. Times book critic David L. Ulin and me, Carolyn Kellogg, for a video chat about the L.A. Times Festival of Books . The festival takes place the weekend of April 20-21 on the USC campus, and we'll be bringing you our insiders' preview. We'll try to share some of the insights we've accrued over the years -- for instance, we hope it'll be sunny, but not too sunny. And we'll talk about what's new this year. And we'll talk about the festival's many discussions and readings: what we're looking forward to and what we're upset that we're missing because it's hard to get to one panel when you're moderating another.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 1, 2013 | By Carolyn Kellogg
Join David L. Ulin and author and artist Ben Katchor at 10 a.m. Tuesday for a live video chat about the art of storytelling and cities, real and imagined. Katchor is a visionary comic artist, a MacArthur "Genius" fellow who has made urban landscapes part of his subject. "Born in 1951, he makes comics that bristle with an off-kilter melancholy reminiscent of New York in the 1970s, a city in decline but also oddly full of life," Ulin wrote in a review of his latest collection.
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