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Ulrich Ruckriem

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September 21, 1997 | Kristine McKenna, Kristine McKenna is a regular contributor to Calendar
Minimalism is generally thought of as an American innovation. With Carl Andre, Donald Judd and Dan Flavin leading the charge, this austere, largely geometric style marched alongside Pop during the late 1960s, and together they brought an end to the reign of Abstract Expressionism. This episode of history transpired in Manhattan for the most part, but Minimalism also had its representatives in Europe; prominent among them is German artist Ulrich Ruckriem, whose work is on view through Nov.
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ENTERTAINMENT
September 21, 1997 | Kristine McKenna, Kristine McKenna is a regular contributor to Calendar
Minimalism is generally thought of as an American innovation. With Carl Andre, Donald Judd and Dan Flavin leading the charge, this austere, largely geometric style marched alongside Pop during the late 1960s, and together they brought an end to the reign of Abstract Expressionism. This episode of history transpired in Manhattan for the most part, but Minimalism also had its representatives in Europe; prominent among them is German artist Ulrich Ruckriem, whose work is on view through Nov.
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ENTERTAINMENT
May 20, 1988 | Suzanne Muchnic
Ulrich Ruckriem's split stone sculpture must mark the natural breaking point of Minimalism. Too richly colored and ruggedly gorgeous to conform to an austere aesthetic but too sensibly ordered to wallow in self-expression, these mammoth stones seem to match intellectual will with visual pleasure--and weight with quality. One look tells us it has taken too long for Los Angeles to host this major German artist.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 20, 1995 | WILLIAM WILSON, TIMES ART CRITIC
The Lannan Foundation is a peaceful bower for the contemplation of contemporary art. Its gallery is so pristine that human habitation seems almost an affront. That aside, the space does serve to dramatize its content. In present instance that's good, since the matter is mainly minimalist sculpture. The form needs to be firmly set off from the hurly-burly of a normal urban environment, lest it be mistaken for scaffolding or a discarded crate. No danger of that here.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 21, 1987 | WILLIAM WILSON
You know what conventions are like. Everybody from home boys to schoolmates and work cronies gathers in a far-off spot in hope of getting some work done, furthering their careers, rekindling friendships, cooling rivalries and letting the world know that their group counts for something. If you assemble in a small enough town, you might make the local paper.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 15, 1996 | Kristine McKenna, Kristine McKenna is a regular contributor to Calendar
German artist Stephan Balkenhol looks startled if you ask him a question that's remotely personal--he looks as though it's never happened before. Reserved and soft-spoken, the 39-year-old artist is as inscrutable as his work. A sculptor who creates solitary figures carved from wood, Balkenhol crafts people who do nothing and stare blankly back at the viewer with facial expressions so resolutely neutral they verge on aggression. In L.A.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 12, 1992 | CHRISTOPHER KNIGHT, Christopher Knight is a Times art critic. and
This small city of 200,000 souls, former home to the storytelling Brothers Grimm, was, once upon a time, just a short drive from the ominous border separating East and West. When that dividing line suddenly got erased, Kassel found itself on a redrawn map almost smack in the geographic center of a reunified nation. An event that cataclysmic was no doubt disorienting. Yet, being in the middle of things is not completely alien to the locals.
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