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October 24, 1993 | WILLIAM TUOHY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Nine people were killed and more than 50 injured Saturday when the outlawed Irish Republican Army set off a bomb in the Protestant section of Belfast. It was the deadliest IRA attack in Northern Ireland in six years. The IRA admitted responsibility, claiming that the targeted building was being used for a meeting of an outlawed Protestant paramilitary organization, the Ulster Freedom Fighters.
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NEWS
September 5, 1994 | Reuters
A car bomb exploded Sunday evening outside an office belonging to Sinn Fein, the political wing of the IRA, in the Roman Catholic Falls Road area of Belfast, and a Protestant extremist group took responsibility. Police said no one was injured in the explosion, which could be heard across town and which blew out nearby windows. The outlawed Protestant extremist Ulster Volunteer Force said it was responsible for the blast.
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NEWS
October 17, 1988
A Protestant extremist group said its gunmen killed a leader of the Protestant Ulster Defense Assn. because he betrayed the association's cause in Northern Ireland. The outlawed Ulster Freedom Fighters said James Craig, 47, was the target in the Saturday shooting in a Belfast bar. A second man was killed and four others were wounded in the gunfire. Initially, guerrillas of the outlawed Irish Republican Army were suspected.
NEWS
October 24, 1993 | WILLIAM TUOHY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Nine people were killed and more than 50 injured Saturday when the outlawed Irish Republican Army set off a bomb in the Protestant section of Belfast. It was the deadliest IRA attack in Northern Ireland in six years. The IRA admitted responsibility, claiming that the targeted building was being used for a meeting of an outlawed Protestant paramilitary organization, the Ulster Freedom Fighters.
NEWS
October 17, 1988
The military wing of the Ulster Defense Assn., the largest Protestant paramilitary group in Northern Ireland, claimed responsibility for the murder of one of the group's leaders. The outlawed loyalist group, the Ulster Freedom Fighters, said it "executed" defense association leader Jimmy Craig. He was killed when two masked men entered the Castle Inn bar in Belfast on Saturday, forced customers to lie on the floor and opened fire. Another man was also killed and four people were wounded.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 14, 1990
I agree with the editorial of Aug. 1, speaking to the IRA and Noraid in the occupied area in Northern Ireland. I do not agree with the placement of article on Page A27 on Aug. 2. This article was about the murder of an Irish Catholic by four masked gunmen who killed a father celebrating his son's 5th birthday. The Ulster Freedom Fighters, an outlawed Protestant extremist group, later claimed responsibility. Please be fair when reporting related items. DON STONEBRAKER Huntington Beach
NEWS
September 5, 1994 | Reuters
A car bomb exploded Sunday evening outside an office belonging to Sinn Fein, the political wing of the IRA, in the Roman Catholic Falls Road area of Belfast, and a Protestant extremist group took responsibility. Police said no one was injured in the explosion, which could be heard across town and which blew out nearby windows. The outlawed Protestant extremist Ulster Volunteer Force said it was responsible for the blast.
NEWS
October 5, 1991 | Reuters
Protestant extremists Friday shot and seriously wounded a leading trade-union official working to stamp out sectarianism in Northern Ireland. The outlawed Ulster Freedom Fighters admitted responsibility for shooting Pearse McKenna as he walked toward a Belfast bakery. Police said he was in serious but stable condition. The Transport Union called the attack sectarian and said McKenna had been working hard to improve conditions for workers, both Catholic and Protestant.
NEWS
March 26, 1993 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Five Roman Catholics were shot to death on the bloodiest day this year in Northern Ireland's conflict. Protestant extremists killed four Catholic workers and seriously wounded one in the seaside town of Castlerock. The Ulster Freedom Fighters, an outlawed group, claimed responsibility. Another Catholic was killed in Belfast in a suspected shooting by Protestants. Meanwhile, a second child died from injuries suffered last weekend in an Irish Republican Army attack in England.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 14, 1990
I agree with the editorial of Aug. 1, speaking to the IRA and Noraid in the occupied area in Northern Ireland. I do not agree with the placement of article on Page A27 on Aug. 2. This article was about the murder of an Irish Catholic by four masked gunmen who killed a father celebrating his son's 5th birthday. The Ulster Freedom Fighters, an outlawed Protestant extremist group, later claimed responsibility. Please be fair when reporting related items. DON STONEBRAKER Huntington Beach
NEWS
October 17, 1988
A Protestant extremist group said its gunmen killed a leader of the Protestant Ulster Defense Assn. because he betrayed the association's cause in Northern Ireland. The outlawed Ulster Freedom Fighters said James Craig, 47, was the target in the Saturday shooting in a Belfast bar. A second man was killed and four others were wounded in the gunfire. Initially, guerrillas of the outlawed Irish Republican Army were suspected.
NEWS
October 17, 1988
The military wing of the Ulster Defense Assn., the largest Protestant paramilitary group in Northern Ireland, claimed responsibility for the murder of one of the group's leaders. The outlawed loyalist group, the Ulster Freedom Fighters, said it "executed" defense association leader Jimmy Craig. He was killed when two masked men entered the Castle Inn bar in Belfast on Saturday, forced customers to lie on the floor and opened fire. Another man was also killed and four people were wounded.
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