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NEWS
March 26, 2000 |
Assailed by critics of compromise, Nobel laureate David Trimble narrowly won reelection Saturday as leader of the Ulster Unionists, a Protestant party central to Northern Ireland's peace accord. The Ulster Unionists' grass-roots council gave Trimble 457 votes to 348 for a last-minute challenger, the Rev. Martin Smyth. The party veteran argued that Trimble had been wrong to attempt a coalition government involving Sinn Fein, the party linked to the outlawed Irish Republican Army.
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NEWS
December 2, 2001 | From Times Wire Reports
The leader of Northern Ireland's unity government triumphed over hard-liners within his Protestant party, brightening prospects for Catholic-Protestant cooperation and peacemaking efforts in the troubled British province. David Trimble, who has faced persistent challenges to his leadership of the Ulster Unionist Party, received a 409-320 vote from his party's grass-roots council.
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NEWS
November 28, 1999 | MARJORIE MILLER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Overcoming decades of hatred and deep internal divisions, Northern Ireland's largest Protestant political party decided Saturday to back a compromise deal to set up a power-sharing government with Roman Catholics before the Irish Republican Army begins to disarm. The Ulster Unionist Party council's vote clears the way for Northern Ireland to establish its first provincial government in more than a quarter-century.
NEWS
May 31, 2000 | From Associated Press
As Northern Ireland's resurrected Catholic-Protestant government got back to business Tuesday, both sides expressed hope that the unlikely coalition will survive on the second try. But nobody involved predicted smooth sailing for self-government by the four-party Cabinet--the central goal of the province's 1998 peace accord, and one that has been repeatedly hamstrung by arguments over Irish Republican Army disarmament.
NEWS
May 31, 2000 | From Associated Press
As Northern Ireland's resurrected Catholic-Protestant government got back to business Tuesday, both sides expressed hope that the unlikely coalition will survive on the second try. But nobody involved predicted smooth sailing for self-government by the four-party Cabinet--the central goal of the province's 1998 peace accord, and one that has been repeatedly hamstrung by arguments over Irish Republican Army disarmament.
NEWS
May 28, 2000 | MARJORIE MILLER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Putting pragmatism ahead of emotions, Northern Ireland's main Protestant party voted narrowly Saturday to return to a power-sharing government with the Roman Catholic allies of the Irish Republican Army. The decision--a make-or-break moment for the 1998 Good Friday peace agreement--was a triumph for Ulster Unionist Party chief David Trimble, who risked his leadership to win a positive vote.
NEWS
March 24, 2000 | Associated Press
A Protestant critic of Northern Ireland's peace settlement announced Thursday that he will try to oust David Trimble from leadership of the province's largest party, the Ulster Unionists. Unionist Martin Smyth, a South Belfast member of the British Parliament, said he opposes involvement of Sinn Fein in a Northern Ireland power-sharing government because of the party's alliance with the outlawed Irish Republican Army.
NEWS
December 2, 2001 | From Times Wire Reports
The leader of Northern Ireland's unity government triumphed over hard-liners within his Protestant party, brightening prospects for Catholic-Protestant cooperation and peacemaking efforts in the troubled British province. David Trimble, who has faced persistent challenges to his leadership of the Ulster Unionist Party, received a 409-320 vote from his party's grass-roots council.
NEWS
March 10, 1996 | From Reuters
Leading members of Northern Ireland's pro-British Protestant unionist party will attend the White House's St. Patrick's Day celebrations next week while their Sinn Fein foes will be excluded because of IRA violence. David Trimble, leader of the mainstream Ulster Unionist Party, has accepted an invitation from President Clinton to attend the festivities. "It is a dramatic turn of events.
NEWS
December 12, 2000 | MARJORIE MILLER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
As President Clinton prepared Monday for his farewell trip to Northern Ireland, Protestant and Roman Catholic legislators hammered out bills on dangerous dogs, drunk driving and e-mail, and accused each other of reneging on the Good Friday peace agreement. The routine, almost mundane, work by former blood enemies underlined the gains of the April 1998 peace accord that Clinton is coming to celebrate, while the mutual recriminations illustrated the enormous hurdles he will prod them to overcome.
NEWS
May 28, 2000 | MARJORIE MILLER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Putting pragmatism ahead of emotions, Northern Ireland's main Protestant party voted narrowly Saturday to return to a power-sharing government with the Roman Catholic allies of the Irish Republican Army. The decision--a make-or-break moment for the 1998 Good Friday peace agreement--was a triumph for Ulster Unionist Party chief David Trimble, who risked his leadership to win a positive vote.
NEWS
March 26, 2000 |
Assailed by critics of compromise, Nobel laureate David Trimble narrowly won reelection Saturday as leader of the Ulster Unionists, a Protestant party central to Northern Ireland's peace accord. The Ulster Unionists' grass-roots council gave Trimble 457 votes to 348 for a last-minute challenger, the Rev. Martin Smyth. The party veteran argued that Trimble had been wrong to attempt a coalition government involving Sinn Fein, the party linked to the outlawed Irish Republican Army.
NEWS
March 24, 2000 | Associated Press
A Protestant critic of Northern Ireland's peace settlement announced Thursday that he will try to oust David Trimble from leadership of the province's largest party, the Ulster Unionists. Unionist Martin Smyth, a South Belfast member of the British Parliament, said he opposes involvement of Sinn Fein in a Northern Ireland power-sharing government because of the party's alliance with the outlawed Irish Republican Army.
NEWS
November 28, 1999 | MARJORIE MILLER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Overcoming decades of hatred and deep internal divisions, Northern Ireland's largest Protestant political party decided Saturday to back a compromise deal to set up a power-sharing government with Roman Catholics before the Irish Republican Army begins to disarm. The Ulster Unionist Party council's vote clears the way for Northern Ireland to establish its first provincial government in more than a quarter-century.
NEWS
July 4, 1999 | MARJORIE MILLER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
From the hilltop Drumcree Church here, overlooking a field of razor wire and armored police jeeps, to the fortified headquarters of the Ulster Unionist Party in Northern Ireland's capital, Protestants were in no mood Saturday to compromise for peace.
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