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NEWS
September 3, 1989
British undercover soldiers shot and killed a Protestant extremist in Northern Ireland minutes after he and another gunman killed a Roman Catholic in the Ardoyne area of Belfast, security sources said. Residents said the man killed by the army is believed to be a member of the outlawed Ulster Volunteer Force. His accomplice was wounded. Witnesses said the two attackers came up to their victim, Patrick McKenna, 38, on a motorcycle and that one dismounted and shot McKenna.
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WORLD
September 9, 2009 | Times Wire Reports
The British government said the last remaining armed paramilitary groups in Northern Ireland had pledged to decommission all their weapons within six months. Northern Ireland Secretary Shaun Woodward said the Ulster Defense Assn. and a breakaway unit pledged to give up their arms by February 2010, just before the end of a long-running amnesty that allows paramilitary groups to give up their weapons without being prosecuted. Two other paramilitary groups, the Ulster Volunteer Force and the Red Hand Commando, handed over their guns, ammunition and explosives in June.
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WORLD
September 9, 2009 | Times Wire Reports
The British government said the last remaining armed paramilitary groups in Northern Ireland had pledged to decommission all their weapons within six months. Northern Ireland Secretary Shaun Woodward said the Ulster Defense Assn. and a breakaway unit pledged to give up their arms by February 2010, just before the end of a long-running amnesty that allows paramilitary groups to give up their weapons without being prosecuted. Two other paramilitary groups, the Ulster Volunteer Force and the Red Hand Commando, handed over their guns, ammunition and explosives in June.
WORLD
June 28, 2009 | Henry Chu
Lasting peace in Northern Ireland took another step forward Saturday when major Protestant paramilitary organizations announced that they had decommissioned some or all of their weapons, following a similar move years earlier by the opposing Irish Republican Army. The Ulster Defense Assn.
NEWS
September 5, 1994 | Reuters
A car bomb exploded Sunday evening outside an office belonging to Sinn Fein, the political wing of the IRA, in the Roman Catholic Falls Road area of Belfast, and a Protestant extremist group took responsibility. Police said no one was injured in the explosion, which could be heard across town and which blew out nearby windows. The outlawed Protestant extremist Ulster Volunteer Force said it was responsible for the blast.
NEWS
August 8, 1994 | from Reuters
Protestant guerrillas killed a pregnant Roman Catholic woman in her bedroom Sunday, but left her five children unharmed. In a telephone message to a radio station, the outlawed Ulster Volunteer Force admitted murdering Kathleen O'Hagan. O'Hagan, 38, who was six months pregnant, was killed when gunmen broke into her house overnight in a rural area known for its hard-line support of unification with Ireland.
WORLD
June 28, 2009 | Henry Chu
Lasting peace in Northern Ireland took another step forward Saturday when major Protestant paramilitary organizations announced that they had decommissioned some or all of their weapons, following a similar move years earlier by the opposing Irish Republican Army. The Ulster Defense Assn.
WORLD
May 4, 2007 | William Graham, Special to The Times
The outlawed Ulster Volunteer Force, whose gunmen killed hundreds of people during the sectarian conflict that ravaged this province for decades, said Thursday that it was renouncing violence and would disarm its members. Gusty Spence, a 73-year-old founding member of the UVF, said the loyalist group would assume a "nonmilitary, civilianized role." "All recruitment has ceased. Military training has ceased, targeting has ceased and all intelligence rendered obsolete.
NEWS
May 17, 1998 | SHAWN POGATCHNIK, ASSOCIATED PRESS
To understand why Northern Ireland's conflict has defied solution for so long, take the road less traveled and meet the divided people of Moy. The popular image of Northern Ireland is of urban Belfast battlegrounds, where high steel barricades daubed with tribal slogans make divisions between Catholic and Protestant immediate and obvious.
NEWS
March 5, 1991 | Associated Press
An outlawed Protestant paramilitary group, the Ulster Volunteer Force, claimed responsibility Monday for shooting to death four Roman Catholic men and seriously wounding a fifth at a village pub in Northern Ireland. The Royal Ulster Constabulary said two suspects were being questioned about the attack Sunday night in Cappagh, 50 miles west of Belfast.
WORLD
May 4, 2007 | William Graham, Special to The Times
The outlawed Ulster Volunteer Force, whose gunmen killed hundreds of people during the sectarian conflict that ravaged this province for decades, said Thursday that it was renouncing violence and would disarm its members. Gusty Spence, a 73-year-old founding member of the UVF, said the loyalist group would assume a "nonmilitary, civilianized role." "All recruitment has ceased. Military training has ceased, targeting has ceased and all intelligence rendered obsolete.
NEWS
September 5, 1994 | Reuters
A car bomb exploded Sunday evening outside an office belonging to Sinn Fein, the political wing of the IRA, in the Roman Catholic Falls Road area of Belfast, and a Protestant extremist group took responsibility. Police said no one was injured in the explosion, which could be heard across town and which blew out nearby windows. The outlawed Protestant extremist Ulster Volunteer Force said it was responsible for the blast.
NEWS
August 8, 1994 | from Reuters
Protestant guerrillas killed a pregnant Roman Catholic woman in her bedroom Sunday, but left her five children unharmed. In a telephone message to a radio station, the outlawed Ulster Volunteer Force admitted murdering Kathleen O'Hagan. O'Hagan, 38, who was six months pregnant, was killed when gunmen broke into her house overnight in a rural area known for its hard-line support of unification with Ireland.
NEWS
September 3, 1989
British undercover soldiers shot and killed a Protestant extremist in Northern Ireland minutes after he and another gunman killed a Roman Catholic in the Ardoyne area of Belfast, security sources said. Residents said the man killed by the army is believed to be a member of the outlawed Ulster Volunteer Force. His accomplice was wounded. Witnesses said the two attackers came up to their victim, Patrick McKenna, 38, on a motorcycle and that one dismounted and shot McKenna.
WORLD
July 12, 2005 | From Times Wire Reports
Two shootings in Belfast, Northern Ireland, left one man dead and another critically wounded. Police and politicians blamed feuding between two outlawed Protestant groups: the Ulster Volunteer Force and the Loyalist Volunteer Force. Violence frequently flares before July 12, an official holiday when tens of thousands of Protestant members of the Orange Order fraternity hold a parade.
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