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July 27, 1987 | United Press International
Irish Republican Army gunmen burst into the home of an ailing 41-year-old policeman today and shot him to death at point-blank range in front of his screaming wife, authorities said. The slaying brought to 62 the death toll from political and sectarian violence in British-ruled Northern Ireland in the first seven months of 1987.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 7, 2001
It still isn't often that Catholics and Protestants in Ulster agree on politics. As the renewed political crisis in the region deepens, however, moderates are linking arms on three key issues. First and foremost, that the Irish Republican Army must begin putting its arms beyond reach right now.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 5, 1999
In the long and often painful process of establishing a durable peace in Northern Ireland, this past year has been productive. First came the landmark Good Friday Agreements, which committed most of the feuding political parties of Ulster to a partnership of mutual respect. The agreements obligated the signatories to a new type of relationship within Northern Ireland and also between north and south and between Ireland and Britain.
NEWS
April 2, 1988 | United Press International
A 17-year-old student Friday became the fifth person charged in the deaths of 2 British soldiers who were beaten and shot to death by mourners at an IRA funeral two weeks ago. Anthony J. Gallagher, of Belfast, was accused of causing grievous bodily harm to one of the victims, Cpl. David Howes, and was ordered held in custody until April 22, pending a hearing, police said. Four other men have already been charged in the case.
NEWS
August 9, 1994
Security forces in Northern Ireland are braced this week for marches by both Roman Catholic Republicans and Protestant Unionists. Today Republicans will commemorate with parades in several cities the 23rd anniversary of the introduction of internment--imprisonment without trial--in British-ruled Northern Ireland, a practice the London authorities have since discarded.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 16, 1988
In the interests of common sense I have to comment on Michael McDonald's article which asserts that "Power, Not Religion, Is the Ulster Problem" (Op-Ed Page, April 3). In the past others also have advanced the astonishing proposition that religion is not responsible for what is happening in Northern Ireland. To believe this is to believe that if all the Catholics became Protestant, or vice versa, the battle would continue unabated! When two strangers meet in Northern Ireland, the dialogue that ensues is directed primarily to establishing, from references to schools, place of residence, and so on, what religion each of them follows.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 21, 1989 | RICHARD HARVEY, Richard Harvey, an attorney with the New York law firm of Stevens, Hinds & White, represented the Brehon Irish Law Society of New York, the National Conference of Black Lawyers and the National Lawyers Guild at the funeral of Patrick Finucane.
Fifteen-year-old Michael Finucane was greeting mourners, describing how his family was sitting down to their evening meal when they heard the hall door being kicked in by three men. As his father, Patrick Finucane, got up to go to the kitchen door, one of the killers fired a machine gun through its glass panels. Finucane, 38, one of Belfast's outstanding human-rights lawyers, fell to the floor.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 2, 2000
Conflict has prevailed in Ireland since the Normans landed in 1169. The centuries have seen the people of Ulster, the northern tip of the island, struggling through short intervals of tranquillity and long periods of war, but at no other time had the prospect of a lasting political settlement between the Irish and English communities seemed so close as recently.
NEWS
September 6, 1995 | From Associated Press
Saying it needed a few days to settle differences with Britain, the Irish government withdrew Tuesday from a meeting intended to pave the way for Northern Ireland peace talks. The key issue was Britain's insistence that the Irish Republican Army promise to disarm before its allies in the Sinn Fein party may join negotiations. Sinn Fein has rejected the demand. British Prime Minister John Major had planned to meet today with his Irish counterpart, John Bruton.
NEWS
December 3, 1986
Prisoners in Northern Ireland's main guerrilla prison wrecked their cells in a rampage provoked by a guards' strike, officials in the British-ruled province said. Guards at the top security Maze prison refused to work after one of them was disciplined for sleeping at his post, prison officials said. Trouble flared when the inmates were confined to their cells, missed breakfast and had all their visits and deliveries of food parcels abruptly canceled.
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