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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 27, 2013
A deeply satisfying feat of storytelling, "Bless Me, Ultima" makes a difficult task look easy. It combines innocence and experience in a way not easy to categorize but a pleasure to watch. Taken from Rudolfo Anaya's landmark book, "Bless Me, Ultima" was a challenge because though it has a 6-year-old protagonist, likely material for a Disney film this is not. Which is why Carl Franklin is the ideal person to bring it to the screen. As the director of the mother-daughter drama "One True Thing," Franklin understands emotion.
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ENTERTAINMENT
May 29, 2013 | By Carolyn Kellogg
The National Endowment for the Arts announced $1 million in grants for the Big Read projects taking place across the U.S. in 2013-14. The Big Read was launched in 2005 to help create one-city-one-book-style projects; for each title on its list, it offers reading guides, discussion questions, and other supporting materials -- as well as grants, which in this round range from $3,000 to $17,300. Grants are made to nonprofits in communities that, in addition to promote reading the books, plan a range of activities around them.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 21, 2013 | By Kenneth Turan, Los Angeles Times Film Critic
A deeply satisfying feat of storytelling, "Bless Me, Ultima" makes a difficult task look easy. It combines innocence and experience, the darkness and wonder of life, in a way that is not easy to categorize but a rich pleasure to watch. Taken from Rudolfo Anaya's landmark book, perhaps the bestselling Chicano novel of all time, "Bless Me, Ultima" presented certain obstacles. Though its protagonist is a very young boy, what he observes of life is not exclusively kindhearted. The story has the honesty of emotion you'd associate with having a 6-year-old as protagonist, but likely material for a Disney film this is not. More than that, "Bless Me, Ultima," set in the New Mexico of 1944, posits an age of wonders and miracles where magic realism informs young Antonio Marez's sense of how strange and unfathomable the world can seem.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 14, 2013
Re "Book-to-film heroine," Column One, March 11 Christy Walton and her family, according to Forbes magazine, are worth nearly $28 billion, making her the sixth-richest American. Discussing her work to make "Bless Me, Ultima" into a movie, she said: "We are a fear-based society. I'd like to change that to a faith-based society. " She can begin by changing the policies of her Wal-Mart stores. These stores feed this fear by providing low wages and less-than-adequate medical insurance, by fighting unionization and by selling products imported from Third- World countries, where the workers are paid very little.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 11, 2013 | By Reed Johnson, Los Angeles Times
It's a long way from Christy Walton's ocean-view manse near La Jolla to the arid plains of 1940s New Mexico. But over the decades, the billionaire heiress to the Wal-Mart fortune has found solace and inspiration in Rudolfo Anaya's coming-of-age novel, "Bless Me, Ultima," set in that unforgiving landscape, and in the mystical story of a Mexican American boy named Tony who lives there. Finally, a realization hit her. "One of the things I wanted to do before I died was to see this book made into a movie," Walton said one recent morning, gazing from her cliffside home toward the Pacific.
NEWS
November 11, 1990
In Mary Yarber's education column dealing with ethnic literature in the schools (Times, Oct. 25), she omitted mention of a book that is a favorite of Hispanic students here at Venice High School, Rudolfo Anaya's "Bless Me, Ultima." It is a lyrical portrait of a youth growing up, torn between his mother's and his father's wishes for him and for themselves. Written in English and Spanish, the novel focuses also on the boy's struggle to determine whether his grandmother is a bruja (evil sorceress)
OPINION
February 11, 2009
Re "Why book bans fail," editorial, Feb. 6 Whether Rudolfo Anaya's "Bless Me, Ultima" should be compulsory reading in any school district is an issue of substance. Dropping the book from the compulsory list is in no sense banning it. As you suggest, because it remains available to the students, it may be more popular and more subject to discussion by readers than it would be if required. I do not envy the superintendent. Faced with the expectation that some of those compelled to read the book would be offended, the decision may have been correct.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 14, 2013
Re "Book-to-film heroine," Column One, March 11 Christy Walton and her family, according to Forbes magazine, are worth nearly $28 billion, making her the sixth-richest American. Discussing her work to make "Bless Me, Ultima" into a movie, she said: "We are a fear-based society. I'd like to change that to a faith-based society. " She can begin by changing the policies of her Wal-Mart stores. These stores feed this fear by providing low wages and less-than-adequate medical insurance, by fighting unionization and by selling products imported from Third- World countries, where the workers are paid very little.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 29, 2013 | By Carolyn Kellogg
The National Endowment for the Arts announced $1 million in grants for the Big Read projects taking place across the U.S. in 2013-14. The Big Read was launched in 2005 to help create one-city-one-book-style projects; for each title on its list, it offers reading guides, discussion questions, and other supporting materials -- as well as grants, which in this round range from $3,000 to $17,300. Grants are made to nonprofits in communities that, in addition to promote reading the books, plan a range of activities around them.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 5, 2008 | Chris Pasles, Times Staff Writer
Belgian choreographer Wim Vandekeybus creates a world of brutality, fantasy, social and personal struggle, and the primordial urge to create structures whether or not they develop in the direction intended. Most often, they don't. But that doesn't negate the fascination in watching the process.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 11, 2013 | By Reed Johnson, Los Angeles Times
It's a long way from Christy Walton's ocean-view manse near La Jolla to the arid plains of 1940s New Mexico. But over the decades, the billionaire heiress to the Wal-Mart fortune has found solace and inspiration in Rudolfo Anaya's coming-of-age novel, "Bless Me, Ultima," set in that unforgiving landscape, and in the mystical story of a Mexican American boy named Tony who lives there. Finally, a realization hit her. "One of the things I wanted to do before I died was to see this book made into a movie," Walton said one recent morning, gazing from her cliffside home toward the Pacific.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 27, 2013
A deeply satisfying feat of storytelling, "Bless Me, Ultima" makes a difficult task look easy. It combines innocence and experience in a way not easy to categorize but a pleasure to watch. Taken from Rudolfo Anaya's landmark book, "Bless Me, Ultima" was a challenge because though it has a 6-year-old protagonist, likely material for a Disney film this is not. Which is why Carl Franklin is the ideal person to bring it to the screen. As the director of the mother-daughter drama "One True Thing," Franklin understands emotion.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 21, 2013 | By Kenneth Turan, Los Angeles Times Film Critic
A deeply satisfying feat of storytelling, "Bless Me, Ultima" makes a difficult task look easy. It combines innocence and experience, the darkness and wonder of life, in a way that is not easy to categorize but a rich pleasure to watch. Taken from Rudolfo Anaya's landmark book, perhaps the bestselling Chicano novel of all time, "Bless Me, Ultima" presented certain obstacles. Though its protagonist is a very young boy, what he observes of life is not exclusively kindhearted. The story has the honesty of emotion you'd associate with having a 6-year-old as protagonist, but likely material for a Disney film this is not. More than that, "Bless Me, Ultima," set in the New Mexico of 1944, posits an age of wonders and miracles where magic realism informs young Antonio Marez's sense of how strange and unfathomable the world can seem.
FOOD
June 23, 2012 | By Noelle Carter, Los Angeles Times
Dear SOS: Mucho Ultima Mexicana Restaurant in Manhattan Beach makes the best strawberry mojito I have ever had. Can you please get the recipe from them so I can make and enjoy it at home? It's the perfect drink. Thank you. Diana Lecanda Sherman Oaks Dear Diana: Bright and lightly sweet, fresh strawberries are a perfect complement to the classic lime and mint in this mojito. Mucho Ultima changes its mojitos seasonally but was happy to share this recipe with us. Cheers!
OPINION
February 11, 2009
Re "Why book bans fail," editorial, Feb. 6 Whether Rudolfo Anaya's "Bless Me, Ultima" should be compulsory reading in any school district is an issue of substance. Dropping the book from the compulsory list is in no sense banning it. As you suggest, because it remains available to the students, it may be more popular and more subject to discussion by readers than it would be if required. I do not envy the superintendent. Faced with the expectation that some of those compelled to read the book would be offended, the decision may have been correct.
OPINION
February 6, 2009
We recognize and appreciate the right of school districts to choose books for their curricula. Still, the actions of Stanislaus County school officials in removing Rudolfo Anaya's "Bless Me, Ultima" from the high school reading list underscore the difficulties in exercising that authority with care -- and to the desired effect. At its meeting this week, the board of the Newman Crows Landing Unified School District voted 4 to 1 to remove the novel from the required reading list for sophomores.
BUSINESS
September 25, 1997 | Bloomberg News
Electronic Arts Inc. started selling its long-awaited Ultima Online, a video game played over the Internet that lets thousands of players roam a fantasy world called Britannia. Analysts have been waiting for the product to go on sale to gauge the commercial appeal of Internet games. Such games have the potential to drive sales of advanced computer hardware and software because faster computers and modems let players perform better.
BUSINESS
June 15, 1993
Styles on Video Inc., a Canoga Park maker of computerized imaging systems that show pictures of proposed hairstyles, said it agreed to provide all in-store imaging for Revlon Inc.'s Ultima II cosmetics in leading department stores nationwide. Styles said Revlon selected it after a recent successful two-month test of Styles' imaging system in several Los Angeles area department stores, including The Broadway and Robinsons/May. Styles on Video Inc.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 4, 2009 | Seema Mehta
A Stanislaus County school board banned a celebrated but controversial piece of Chicano literature from its high school classrooms this week because trustees and the superintendent believe "Bless Me, Ultima" contains too much profanity. The Newman Crows Landing Board of Education voted 4 to 1 Monday night to strip the coming-of-age novel by Rudolfo Anaya from the sophomore required reading list at Orestimba High School.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 5, 2008 | Chris Pasles, Times Staff Writer
Belgian choreographer Wim Vandekeybus creates a world of brutality, fantasy, social and personal struggle, and the primordial urge to create structures whether or not they develop in the direction intended. Most often, they don't. But that doesn't negate the fascination in watching the process.
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