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BUSINESS
September 25, 1997 | Bloomberg News
Electronic Arts Inc. started selling its long-awaited Ultima Online, a video game played over the Internet that lets thousands of players roam a fantasy world called Britannia. Analysts have been waiting for the product to go on sale to gauge the commercial appeal of Internet games. Such games have the potential to drive sales of advanced computer hardware and software because faster computers and modems let players perform better.
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BUSINESS
March 5, 2003 | Alex Pham, Times Staff Writer
Video game powerhouse Electronic Arts Inc. announced plans Tuesday to fold its EA.com unit into its core publishing business after the online-gaming venture racked up nearly $300 million in losses. EA had once hoped to spin off the unit, which had nearly 400 employees at its peak. Instead, the company has been forced to scale it back, although it plans to continue its current lineup of online games. The Redwood City, Calif.
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BUSINESS
December 29, 1997 | MICHELLE V. RAFTER, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES; Freelance writer Michelle V. Rafter is a regular contributor to The Cutting Edge. She can be reached at mvrafter@deltanet.com
By day, Ron McKown is a mild-mannered technical manager at a Ventura County Internet service provider. By night, he becomes Golgotha, grandmaster warrior, sword-wielding slayer of monsters and protector of innocents in the city of Baja in the kingdom of Britannia. McKown's metamorphosis occurs in Ultima Online (http://www.ultimaonline.com), the Internet-based fantasy role-playing game from Electronic Arts subsidiary Origin Systems Inc.
BUSINESS
May 10, 1999 | ASHLEY DUNN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Creating virtual worlds that could be shared by thousands of people at the same time was once one of the most esoteric pursuits in cyberspace--a project that only the wildly futuristic would even consider. Worlds such as Meridian 59 and AlphaWorld were technically difficult to build, hard to manage and appealed to only the most fanatical of Internet denizens.
BUSINESS
May 10, 1999 | ASHLEY DUNN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Creating virtual worlds that could be shared by thousands of people at the same time was once one of the most esoteric pursuits in cyberspace--a project that only the wildly futuristic would even consider. Worlds such as Meridian 59 and AlphaWorld were technically difficult to build, hard to manage and appealed to only the most fanatical of Internet denizens.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 27, 1997 | MARK GLASER, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Various game companies have promised "massively multi-player" games built expressly for the Net with thousands of players competing from around the globe. Now two very different games have fulfilled that promise by creating contests that force you to cooperate with strangers. Ultima Online gives role-playing gamers an organic fantasy world, while Subspace gives blast-'n'-shooters the chance to band together in teams.
BUSINESS
March 5, 2003 | Alex Pham, Times Staff Writer
Video game powerhouse Electronic Arts Inc. announced plans Tuesday to fold its EA.com unit into its core publishing business after the online-gaming venture racked up nearly $300 million in losses. EA had once hoped to spin off the unit, which had nearly 400 employees at its peak. Instead, the company has been forced to scale it back, although it plans to continue its current lineup of online games. The Redwood City, Calif.
NEWS
April 20, 2000 | ASHLEY DUNN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
After putting in a full day at his computer technician job, a 30-year-old Internet game player known as Ebaid went home, logged on to a game called "EverQuest" and started his night job. His game character donned armor, slapped on his sword and began slaying beasts so he could make some real money. Hail the rise of yet another strange creature of the Internet revolution--the professional online game hunter. Ebaid played for hours, slaying every computer-generated monster on his screen.
NEWS
May 17, 2001 | ALEX PHAM, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In her flowing crimson cape, thigh-high leather boots and metal-studded red leather bustier, Cardinal is a bow-and-arrow-toting femme fatale. But not only is Cardinal not real--she's a character in the popular computer game "Ultima Online"--she's not really female. Cardinal is the alter-ego of Kenn Gold, a 33-year-old former Army sergeant with thorny green-and-black tattoos covering both of his muscular arms.
BUSINESS
December 1, 1997
Games dominate a list of the 10 bestselling CD-ROMs for September: *--* Rank Title Publisher Average price 1 MS Flight Simulator 98 Microsoft $47 2 Myst Broderbund 17 3 Star Fleet Academy Interplay Productions 49 4 Uninstaller 4.5 CyberMedia 37 5 Hexen 2 Activision 44 6 Mac OS 8.0 Apple Computer 92 7 Dark Reign Activision 47 8 Galaxy of Games Romtech 10 9 Ultima Online Electronic Arts 57 10 Diablo Davidson 45 *--* Note: Compiled from information taken from a survey of more than 9,015 stores.
BUSINESS
December 29, 1997 | MICHELLE V. RAFTER, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES; Freelance writer Michelle V. Rafter is a regular contributor to The Cutting Edge. She can be reached at mvrafter@deltanet.com
By day, Ron McKown is a mild-mannered technical manager at a Ventura County Internet service provider. By night, he becomes Golgotha, grandmaster warrior, sword-wielding slayer of monsters and protector of innocents in the city of Baja in the kingdom of Britannia. McKown's metamorphosis occurs in Ultima Online (http://www.ultimaonline.com), the Internet-based fantasy role-playing game from Electronic Arts subsidiary Origin Systems Inc.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 27, 1997 | MARK GLASER, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Various game companies have promised "massively multi-player" games built expressly for the Net with thousands of players competing from around the globe. Now two very different games have fulfilled that promise by creating contests that force you to cooperate with strangers. Ultima Online gives role-playing gamers an organic fantasy world, while Subspace gives blast-'n'-shooters the chance to band together in teams.
BUSINESS
September 25, 1997 | Bloomberg News
Electronic Arts Inc. started selling its long-awaited Ultima Online, a video game played over the Internet that lets thousands of players roam a fantasy world called Britannia. Analysts have been waiting for the product to go on sale to gauge the commercial appeal of Internet games. Such games have the potential to drive sales of advanced computer hardware and software because faster computers and modems let players perform better.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 17, 2000 | VIVIAN LETRAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Forget the arcades of the '80s. An art exhibition opening today at UC Irvine's new Beall Center is guaranteed to rock your joystick. "Shift-CTRL" is a collection of computer games created by 23 national and international artists who explore social issues related to gaming. The art show is a universe of electronically produced images and experiences. Games such as The Sims and Ultima Online, for instance, offer unique scenarios that are created in virtual worlds.
BUSINESS
March 23, 2001 | Alex Pham
Electronic Arts Inc., the Redwood City, Calif., video game developer, laid off 200 employees, or about 6% of its work force, this week and canceled development of a much-anticipated sequel to Ultima Online, a popular subscription-based game. Most of the cuts occurred at Pogo.com, a San Francisco-based games Web site that EA purchased earlier this month for $42 million in a bid to expand its online games business, EA.com.
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