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REAL ESTATE
January 30, 2005 | From Times wire reports
With sales of million-dollar homes on the rise, the publisher of Unique Homes magazine figures that buyers of super luxury homes need some guidance on trading up. The first issue of Ultimate Homes magazine made its newsstand debut last week, offering what it claims is the "first ever list of more than 850 of the dreamiest dream homes for sale in the country." The least expensive property featured is just under $8 million. Who owns such modern-day palaces?
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REAL ESTATE
January 30, 2005 | From Times wire reports
With sales of million-dollar homes on the rise, the publisher of Unique Homes magazine figures that buyers of super luxury homes need some guidance on trading up. The first issue of Ultimate Homes magazine made its newsstand debut last week, offering what it claims is the "first ever list of more than 850 of the dreamiest dream homes for sale in the country." The least expensive property featured is just under $8 million. Who owns such modern-day palaces?
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BUSINESS
July 10, 2007 | Annette Haddad, Times Staff Writer
The rich are getting richer, and their properties are getting pricier. The 1920s-era Beverly Hills mansion of William Randolph Hearst and Marion Davies was put on the market Monday for $165 million, making it the nation's most expensive residential listing. The pink stucco, H-shaped estate, dubbed Beverly House by the late newspaper magnate, is spread across 6.5 acres north of Sunset Boulevard.
BUSINESS
January 25, 2006 | Annette Haddad, Times Staff Writer
Million-dollar homes were once a sign of real affluence. Now, at least in California, they are getting to be a dime a dozen. Nearly 49,000 homes in the state sold for at least $1 million last year -- a 47% increase from 2004, according to data released Tuesday by DataQuick Information Systems, a La Jolla-based real estate research firm. Adolph Rangel joined the $1-million-home club thanks to the state's 6-year-old real estate boom.
REAL ESTATE
February 19, 2006 | Ann Brenoff, Times Staff Writer
WHAT makes a Bel-Air estate worthy of a $53-million listing price instead of, say, a mere $38 million? Beyond considering the basics -- location, size and view -- setting a price for the most expensive homes in the market can be a pretty arbitrary task, say the agents who handle such properties. Entering into the equation are intuition, personalities -- both seller's and agent's -- and the basic acceptance that mother was wrong when she told you that money couldn't buy everything.
BUSINESS
July 7, 2007 | Annette Haddad, Times Staff Writer
Joyce Rey stands in the soaring marble entryway of a palatial Bel-Air estate, ticking off its selling points. Master suites? There are five of them, along with three living rooms, a gymnasium and a library. The dining chamber is "embassy-size," and the pool and gurgling fountains are on par with those at the finest hotels. "There are six bedrooms under the tennis courts, and nine more above the 10-car garage," Rey tells a cluster of fellow sales agents scouting the place on behalf of clients.
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