Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsUltrasound
IN THE NEWS

Ultrasound

FEATURED ARTICLES
SPORTS
November 1, 1989 | From Associated Press
A James Bond-style ultrasonic gun disguised as a pair of binoculars was used to stun a top thoroughbred during a race, and could have become the key tool in a massive drug and betting conspiracy, a British court was told Tuesday. Defense attorney Jonathan Goldberg said the high-pitched sound from the gun caused the thoroughbred, Ile de Chypre, to veer suddenly and throw jockey Greville Starkey as they were heading for victory at Ascot racecourse on June 16, 1988.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NATIONAL
November 12, 2013 | By David G. Savage
WASHINGTON - For the second week in a row, the Supreme Court let stand a ruling that strikes down a major abortion regulation from Oklahoma, disappointing abortion foes who had hoped conservative justices would impose new limits on a woman's right to terminate a pregnancy. The justices Tuesday turned down Oklahoma's appeal seeking to revive a law that would have required pregnant women to undergo an ultrasound and hear about the fetus' size and possible heartbeat. Last week, the court dismissed the state's appeal of a second law that would have prohibited doctors from prescribing a combination of two drugs commonly used to induce abortion in the early weeks of pregnancy.
Advertisement
NEWS
March 1, 2012 | By Kim Geiger
The Virginia General Assembly has approved a watered-down version of a controversial bill requiring women to have an ultrasound before undergoing an abortion. The measure now goes to Gov. Bob McDonnell for his signature. The bill had initially required transvaginal ultrasounds before all abortions, including those that result from rape or incest, but was amended at McDonnell's urging to require only externally administered ultrasounds. The Virginia Senate passed the new version of the bill last week and included an additional amendment exempting women whose pregnancy was the result of rape or incest, provided the assault was reported to police.
NEWS
January 2, 2013 | By Alexandra Le Tellier
Here's a new trend I wasn't expecting in 2013: ultrasound parties. Yes, you read that right. Pregnant women can now invite their friends and family over for ultrasound viewing parties in the comfort of their own homes. That goes way beyond the traditional baby shower and the more recent (and indulgent) practice of gender-reveal fetes . “Welcome to the new frontier in pregnancy oversharing,” writes Lela Davidson, who details the trend on "Today. " “Will we ever reach the point of saturation when it comes to celebrating a person's pregnancy?
NEWS
January 2, 2013 | By Alexandra Le Tellier
Here's a new trend I wasn't expecting in 2013: ultrasound parties. Yes, you read that right. Pregnant women can now invite their friends and family over for ultrasound viewing parties in the comfort of their own homes. That goes way beyond the traditional baby shower and the more recent (and indulgent) practice of gender-reveal fetes . “Welcome to the new frontier in pregnancy oversharing,” writes Lela Davidson, who details the trend on "Today. " “Will we ever reach the point of saturation when it comes to celebrating a person's pregnancy?
NEWS
February 28, 2012 | By Kim Geiger
The Virginia Senate on Tuesday approved a watered-down version of a bill to require women to undergo an ultrasound before having an abortion. The measure passed largely on party lines by a vote of 21-19. It now heads to the House, where it must be approved before it can be signed into law by Republican Gov. Bob McDonnell. The proposal sparked intense controversy earlier this month because the initial bill required trans-vaginal ultrasounds before an abortion could be performed.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 5, 2006 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Purchase of ultrasound machines for home use would be banned under a bill passed Thursday by the state Assembly. Lawmakers approved AB 2360 by Ted Lieu (D-Torrance), who drafted the bill after hearing that actor Tom Cruise had bought such a machine to see images of his daughter before her birth. The bill must also pass the state Senate.
HEALTH
July 5, 2010 | By Amber Dance, Special to the Los Angeles Times
Engineer George Lewis would like to move the soothing pain relief of ultrasound out of the doctor's office and into your medicine cabinet. The biomedical engineering student, who is about to receive his doctorate from Cornell University in Ithaca, N.Y., is working on a coin-size device to make ultrasound pain relief available any time, anywhere. Doctors and physical therapists use ultrasound for pain relief for conditions such as muscle spasms, tendonitis, osteoarthritis and sciatica.
NEWS
April 13, 1996 | From Associated Press
The Food and Drug Administration approved a powerful ultrasound device Friday to help doctors determine when lumps in women's breasts are noncancerous, so those women can skip a common surgical cancer test. Advanced Technology Laboratories predicts that its High-Definition Imaging, or HDI, ultrasound eventually will reduce by 40% the 700,000 breast biopsies performed annually in the United States. From those biopsies, 180,000 cases of breast cancer are diagnosed every year.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 22, 1994
The story "Baby's First Screen Test" (Valley Life, March 11) misled the public about the perceived safety of ultrasound radiation exposure to fetus and mother. Although ultrasound is used frequently during pregnancy to assess a complication, there are many unanswered safety questions regarding routine exposure of the fetus to these high-energy sound waves. The American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists, the International Childbirth Education Assn. and the U.S. Food and Drug Administration have stated that it is advisable to use ultrasound only when medically indicated and not as a routine procedure during pregnancy.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 16, 2012 | By Sam Adams
A poetic, almost abstract portrait of impoverished ranchers waiting for rain, Everardo Gonzalez's documentary "Drought" traces the parched terrain of northern Mexico, in the communal region called Cuates de Australia. The film provides little in the way of background or ongoing story, although a young couple's journey from prenatal ultrasound to birth provides a rough, and somewhat contrived, sense of progress. González (who served as his own cinematographer) occasionally engages his subjects from behind the camera, but he mainly observes with an outsider's patient eye. He keeps his distance, leaving room for plenty of thoughtfully framed compositions and allowing the hush of a dried-up land to predominate.
NEWS
March 7, 2012 | By Kim Geiger, Los Angeles Times Staff Writer
Virginia Gov. Bob McDonnell has signed into law a controversial bill requiring women to have an ultrasound before undergoing an abortion. The bill sparked a national furor among abortion rights activists who argued that the intent was to make it more costly and more difficult for women to receive abortions. The bill signed by McDonnell on Wednesday is a watered-down version of an earlier bill that would have required women to undergo a trans-vaginal ultrasound and would have applied to all abortions, even those that resulted from rape or incest.
NEWS
March 1, 2012 | By Kim Geiger
The Virginia General Assembly has approved a watered-down version of a controversial bill requiring women to have an ultrasound before undergoing an abortion. The measure now goes to Gov. Bob McDonnell for his signature. The bill had initially required transvaginal ultrasounds before all abortions, including those that result from rape or incest, but was amended at McDonnell's urging to require only externally administered ultrasounds. The Virginia Senate passed the new version of the bill last week and included an additional amendment exempting women whose pregnancy was the result of rape or incest, provided the assault was reported to police.
NEWS
February 28, 2012 | By Kim Geiger
The Virginia Senate on Tuesday approved a watered-down version of a bill to require women to undergo an ultrasound before having an abortion. The measure passed largely on party lines by a vote of 21-19. It now heads to the House, where it must be approved before it can be signed into law by Republican Gov. Bob McDonnell. The proposal sparked intense controversy earlier this month because the initial bill required trans-vaginal ultrasounds before an abortion could be performed.
NATIONAL
February 25, 2012 | By Ian Duncan, Washington Bureau
  The Virginia General Assembly is moving forward with a watered-down version of a controversial abortion bill, despite attracting national ire and ridicule because it would have required a woman to have an ultrasound probe inserted into her vagina before undergoing an abortion. In the new version of the bill, doctors would still have to perform an external ultrasound, but women would be allowed to refuse the more invasive procedure, though doctors must still offer to perform it. The national attention has come as an embarrassment to Virginia Gov. Robert McDonnell, who has been touted as a possible GOP vice presidential nominee, and has found Republicans embroiled in another fight over women's healthcare.
HEALTH
January 30, 2012 | By Deborah Schoch, CHCF Center for Health Reporting
For millions of Americans, bagged salads are a miracle food, the perfect mix of health and convenience. Time-pressed cooks can rip open a bag and pour the leaves right into the bowl, reassured by the "triple-washed" label that some wondrous process has rendered these greens squeaky clean and ready for dinner. They don't want to think about E. coli O157:H7 . And the salad industry doesn't want them thinking about it either. That's why the safety of bagged greens has emerged as one of the most pressing issues in today's fresh produce business.
SCIENCE
September 9, 2006 | From Times Wire Reports
Ultrasound energy can briefly open a door into cells to let drugs and other compounds inside, researchers reported Tuesday in a study that could lead to improvements in medical care. Ultrasound causes the violent collapse of bubbles, which in turn creates enough force to open holes in the outer membranes of cells, the team at the Georgia Institute of Technology and Emory University in Atlanta reported.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 3, 1990 | From Times staff and wire reports
Ultrasound scans can be accurate enough to replace amniocentesis for checking fetuses for spinal abnormalities and other severe birth defects, researchers reported last week in the New England Journal of Medicine. Amniocentesis, while generally safe, carries a small risk--0.5%--of triggering a miscarriage, whereas ultrasound poses no known risk to the growing fetus.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|