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Ultrasound

HEALTH
September 7, 1998 | SHARI ROAN, TIMES HEALTH WRITER
Fetal ultrasound has become so sophisticated that it might be used soon for routine screening for Down syndrome and other chromosomal disorders early in pregnancy. A national study, involving two local medical centers, is underway to see if ultrasound combined with a simple, maternal blood test is a practical way to screen large numbers of pregnant women for chromosomal defects during the first trimester.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 14, 1998
Peter Bloch, 79, who co-founded the company that developed ultrasound technology. A refugee from Nazi Germany, Bloch started Branson Instruments in 1946 with two other men in a garage in Danbury, Conn. The company developed ultrasound and applied it to several medical uses, including fetal monitoring. It also developed devices to test railroad tracks, turbines and ship hulls. On July 7 in New London, N.H., of an apparent aneurysm.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 15, 1998 | BOB JANIS, REUTERS
Ultrasound, the technique employed by doctors to look at human fetuses in the womb, is being used by a growing number of U.S. cattlemen to get a peek at steaks and roasts yet to come. The technique, discussed at a recent cattle-industry meeting in Denver, is designed to take the guesswork out of the optimum time in the feedlot to finish fattening cattle for market. In this case, it is not a fetus the cattle experts are looking at but the amount of fat and marbling under the hide.
NEWS
March 14, 1998 | MARLENE CIMONS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Food and Drug Administration on Friday approved a new device that can diagnose osteoporosis in 10 seconds by scanning a person's heel using ultrasound, a new technology that is dramatically faster and considerably less expensive than the equipment and procedure now in use.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 21, 1998 | RICHARD CROMELIN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Balloon fights and water guns. On the road and talking all night. Verbal battles and "answer" records. "Mad fun." "Exhilarating." These impressions of rap and hip-hop in the 1980s, which are delivered during the hourlong MTV documentary "Back in the Day," make the suspicion and controversy that dogged the scene at the time seem all the more unwarranted.
BUSINESS
January 6, 1998 | From Bloomberg News
Molecular Biosystems Inc. and Mallinckrodt Inc. said they won U.S. approval to sell the first of a new generation of imaging agents used with ultrasound procedures. The Food and Drug Administration approval for the product, called Optison, is key for San Diego-based Molecular Bio, which has been part of a legal struggle with Sonus Pharmaceuticals Inc. and other drug companies over how the FDA regulates imaging agents.
NEWS
December 5, 1997 | CAROL J. WILLIAMS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In the rush of life in modern Moscow, mobile medicine has taken on new meaning: Here, it is the patients who are in motion. With as many as 9 million passengers traversing the 164 miles and 160 stations of the Metro subway system here each day, private doctors and medical technicians have been encouraged to bring a few of their most outpatient-friendly services underground.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 24, 1996 | AVIVA L. BRANDT, ASSOCIATED PRESS
A portable ultrasound system, bundled into an 85-pound backpack load, could enable technicians on remote battlefields to scan injuries and transmit images to doctors hundreds of miles away. The portable system was tested recently in Bosnia, with doctors in Germany interpreting the data stored in computers by the technicians who moved a 12-inch-wide scanner over soldiers' bodies. All the technician needs to know is the general area of the injury or health problem.
NEWS
April 13, 1996 | From Associated Press
The Food and Drug Administration approved a powerful ultrasound device Friday to help doctors determine when lumps in women's breasts are noncancerous, so those women can skip a common surgical cancer test. Advanced Technology Laboratories predicts that its High-Definition Imaging, or HDI, ultrasound eventually will reduce by 40% the 700,000 breast biopsies performed annually in the United States. From those biopsies, 180,000 cases of breast cancer are diagnosed every year.
NEWS
December 27, 1995 | From Associated Press
A hospital is not legally responsible when an ultrasound technician, conducting a pelvic examination of a pregnant woman, sexually molests her, the state Supreme Court ruled Tuesday. Although the hospital put the technician in a position that made the molestation possible, he made an "aberrant decision to engage in conduct unrelated to his duties," the court said in a 5-2 ruling dismissing the woman's damage suit.
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