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Ultraviolet Light

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BUSINESS
September 13, 1999 | LEE DYE
The increasingly ubiquitous digital camera has taken another step into the future with the development of the first such camera that senses only ultraviolet light. Ultraviolet light has shorter wavelengths than visible light. It is sometimes called black light because it causes some materials to glow in the dark. Normal digital cameras "see" light that is visible to the human eye, sometimes called white light.
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ENTERTAINMENT
April 7, 2014 | By Jennifer Ouellette
The title of this week's episode of "Cosmos" is "Hiding in the Light," which - I must confess - evoked memories of a classic episode of "The X-Files," in which Mulder and Scully investigate the Boss from Hell: a giant insect monster who “hides in the light” and whose bite turns employees into zombies. It is only when the lights go out that Mulder glimpses the outline of the monster instead of the man. There were no Bug-Monsters or zombies in the "Cosmos" episode, but there were a Chinese philosopher, an Arab astronomer, and an orphaned German boy who grew up to be a leading optical scientist.
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NEWS
August 15, 1990 | ROBERT STEINBROOK, TIMES MEDICAL WRITER
A form of ultraviolet light therapy that has been successful in treating patients with a rare skin cancer is showing early promise as an experimental AIDS therapy. Four of five patients with AIDS-related complex treated in a preliminary trial had decreased symptoms and improved immune system function, according to an article in today's Annals of Internal Medicine. In laboratory experiments, the treatments have been shown to kill the AIDS virus directly and to stimulate the immune system.
BUSINESS
September 9, 2013 | By Amy Hubbard
A new Van Gogh painting! "Sunset at Montmajour" was unwrapped Monday at a museum that is tooting its own horn, loudly.  It's a rarity, said the director of the Van Gogh Museum. Historic. Once in a lifetime. "A discovery of this magnitude has never before occurred" at the Amsterdam museum, said Alex Reuger.  So, what's it worth? Paintings by Vincent Van Gogh are among the most valuable in the world. And this one was ambitious by Van Gogh's standards, Reuger said, given the canvas size, about 3 feet by 2 1/2 feet.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 23, 1990 | Compiled from Times Wire and Staff Reports
Men who frequently sunbathe nude using ultraviolet lamps substantially increase their risk of developing a rare and potentially fatal genital cancer, according to a new study published last week in the New England Journal of Medicine. The study shows that the penis is particularly susceptible to the carcinogenic effects of sunlight, and it advised men who are frequently exposed to ultraviolet radiation in tanning salons, on the beach, or for therapeutic purposes to protect themselves.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 24, 1992 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
The expanding hole in the ozone layer above the South Pole is significantly reducing the growth of phytoplankton--minute floating plants--that form the foundation of the Antarctic food chain, researchers reported last week. The effect is the first direct evidence that the abnormally high levels of ultraviolet light coming through the ozone hole is having an impact on Antarctic populations, said geographer Raymond C. Smith of UC Santa Barbara, who headed the team.
BUSINESS
August 7, 1988 | DENISE GELLENE, Times Staff Writer
Once upon a time, there were just sunglasses. Now there are special sunglasses for the beach and other sunglasses for the yard. There are "blue light blockers" and "ultraviolet light inhibitors." One firm even touts its sunglasses as "sunscreens for the eyes." The outpouring of sunglasses that block the sun's harmful rays reflects a concern among consumers, amid warnings from eye doctors, that too much ultraviolet light can damage the lens and cause cataracts.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 5, 1988 | Compiled from staff and wire reports
People who wear hats and sunglasses to protect their eyes from strong sunshine could substantially reduce the risk of cataracts, according to a study of fishermen. The research found that frequent exposure to intense sun tripled the risk of a common form of cataracts. "If there is enough sunshine for you to get sunburned, then you should be protecting your eyes," said Hugh R. Taylor of Johns Hopkins University.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 21, 2012 | Susan King
Contrary to popular belief, the Corvette convertible the characters Tod Stiles and Buz Murdock drove on the existential black-and-white 1960-64 CBS series "Route 66" was not red and white. "The original ones were blue," said George Maharis, 83, who starred as the handsome, dangerous and hotheaded Buz, who set out to travel the country with Tod (Martin Milner), a clean-cut young man who had grown up in luxury only to discover after his father's death that most of the money was gone.
BUSINESS
September 9, 2013 | By Amy Hubbard
A new Van Gogh painting! "Sunset at Montmajour" was unwrapped Monday at a museum that is tooting its own horn, loudly.  It's a rarity, said the director of the Van Gogh Museum. Historic. Once in a lifetime. "A discovery of this magnitude has never before occurred" at the Amsterdam museum, said Alex Reuger.  So, what's it worth? Paintings by Vincent Van Gogh are among the most valuable in the world. And this one was ambitious by Van Gogh's standards, Reuger said, given the canvas size, about 3 feet by 2 1/2 feet.
SCIENCE
December 12, 2012 | By Amina Khan
Squinting deep into the universe, the Hubble Space Telescope has picked out what may be the most distant galaxy yet found, observed as it looked about 380 million years after the big bang. This potential record-breaker is one of seven newly discovered galaxies formed more than 13 billion years ago, near the cosmic dawn, the era when the first big galaxies formed. “These galaxies are so young that they existed before many of the atoms in our bodies existed,” said James Bullock, a UC Irvine physics and astronomy professor who was not involved in the study.
WORLD
September 18, 2012 | By Edmund Sanders, Los Angeles Times
SOREQ CAVE, Israel - This prehistoric cave on the slopes of Israel's Judean Mountains has always felt a little otherworldly. Like other dripstone caverns, Soreq Cave is packed with stunning natural sculptures formed by hundreds of thousands of years of mineral-rich water drops slowly leaving behind a rock residue. On the roof is a hanging forest of different-sized rods, resembling icicles, giant carrots, elephant trunks and twisting octopus tentacles. Rising up to meet them from the limestone floor are 30-foot sand castles, spiraling rock towers and billowy hills that resemble coral reefs or heads of cauliflower.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 21, 2012 | Susan King
Contrary to popular belief, the Corvette convertible the characters Tod Stiles and Buz Murdock drove on the existential black-and-white 1960-64 CBS series "Route 66" was not red and white. "The original ones were blue," said George Maharis, 83, who starred as the handsome, dangerous and hotheaded Buz, who set out to travel the country with Tod (Martin Milner), a clean-cut young man who had grown up in luxury only to discover after his father's death that most of the money was gone.
NATIONAL
October 18, 2009 | Diane C. Lade
An ultraviolet light that its sellers promise will "destroy swine flu virus." A dietary supplement claiming to be "more effective than the swine flu shot." Pills, hand sanitizers and air filters galore. Through daily Internet searches, the Food and Drug Administration found hundreds of suspect items advertised as swine flu deterrents and cures, and over the last six months warned 80 Internet purveyors to stop peddling unproved or illegal treatments. The FDA has issued an advisory, telling consumers to use "extreme care" when purchasing online products claiming to diagnose, treat or prevent the H1N1 virus.
BUSINESS
September 13, 1999 | LEE DYE
The increasingly ubiquitous digital camera has taken another step into the future with the development of the first such camera that senses only ultraviolet light. Ultraviolet light has shorter wavelengths than visible light. It is sometimes called black light because it causes some materials to glow in the dark. Normal digital cameras "see" light that is visible to the human eye, sometimes called white light.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 9, 1998 | PATRICK MCGREEVY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Homeowners fighting the construction of water filtration plants at Encino and Stone Canyon reservoirs have persuaded city officials to examine a new purification technology that could cut costs and avoid massive building. City Council members Mike Feuer and Cindy Miscikowski said Tuesday they favor the alternative if tests show that ultraviolet light will make the water safe to drink for 500,000 residents of the San Fernando Valley and Westside.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 9, 1998 | PATRICK MCGREEVY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Homeowners fighting the construction of water filtration plants at Encino and Stone Canyon reservoirs have persuaded city officials to examine a new purification technology that could cut costs and avoid massive building. City Council members Mike Feuer and Cindy Miscikowski said Tuesday they favor the alternative if tests show that ultraviolet light will make the water safe to drink for 500,000 residents of the San Fernando Valley and Westside.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 7, 2014 | By Jennifer Ouellette
The title of this week's episode of "Cosmos" is "Hiding in the Light," which - I must confess - evoked memories of a classic episode of "The X-Files," in which Mulder and Scully investigate the Boss from Hell: a giant insect monster who “hides in the light” and whose bite turns employees into zombies. It is only when the lights go out that Mulder glimpses the outline of the monster instead of the man. There were no Bug-Monsters or zombies in the "Cosmos" episode, but there were a Chinese philosopher, an Arab astronomer, and an orphaned German boy who grew up to be a leading optical scientist.
NEWS
September 1, 1998 | From Associated Press
Scientists have discovered that wrinkles, sagging and other signs of sun-damaged skin can be caused by ultraviolet A solar rays, a form of sunlight not blocked by most lotions now on the market. UVA solar radiation turns a natural molecule on the skin surface into a form of oxygen that speeds up the aging of the skin, said John D. Simon, a Duke University biophysicist and the co-author of a study being published today in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 27, 1995 | TINA DAUNT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Four minutes. That was all it took Wednesday for a fair-skinned, unprotected person to get a sunburn, according to the weather gurus who invented this quirky sun gauge called the ultraviolet index. By 1 p.m., the index had topped the very high level of 11, as it is expected to do again today. Those without hats, sunglasses and heavy-duty sun block could be in serious danger, if you listened to the experts. But Stacy Cobb didn't care.
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