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BUSINESS
November 7, 1991 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Ultrox Leases Its Technology: Ultrox International, a unit of On-Site Toxic Control Inc. of Santa Ana, sold Dallas' Halliburton NUS Environmental Systems Corp. the license to use its water treatment technology worldwide for $700,000. On-Site told the federal Securities and Exchange Commission that the Oct. 18 deal also calls for Halliburton NUS to pay $50,000 for Ultrox's air-pollution control technology and to lease Ultrox's lab equipment for five years at $100,000 a year.
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BUSINESS
November 7, 1991 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Ultrox Leases Its Technology: Ultrox International, a unit of On-Site Toxic Control Inc. of Santa Ana, sold Dallas' Halliburton NUS Environmental Systems Corp. the license to use its water treatment technology worldwide for $700,000. On-Site told the federal Securities and Exchange Commission that the Oct. 18 deal also calls for Halliburton NUS to pay $50,000 for Ultrox's air-pollution control technology and to lease Ultrox's lab equipment for five years at $100,000 a year.
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BUSINESS
January 12, 1989
Ultrox International, a Santa Ana water detoxification company, and On-Site Toxic Control Inc., a Colorado corporation, said Wednesday that they have merged in a stock swap. On-Site Toxic Control, formerly Augusta Financial Inc., will operate Ultrox as a wholly owned subsidiary. The Santa Ana firm will retain the Ultrox name and customers, said David Fletcher, Ultrox president. None of Ultrox's 16 employees are expected to be affected by the merger, Fletcher said.
BUSINESS
September 5, 1990 | JONATHAN WEBER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
As many environmental entrepreneurs have discovered, developing a technology to clean up waste is easier than convincing people to use it. Government and private officials don't like surprises and are often reluctant to try new, unproven techniques. But persistence can eventually pay off. Consider On-Site Toxic Control Inc.
BUSINESS
September 5, 1990 | JONATHAN WEBER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
As many environmental entrepreneurs have discovered, developing a technology to clean up waste is easier than convincing people to use it. Government and private officials don't like surprises and are often reluctant to try new, unproven techniques. But persistence can eventually pay off. Consider On-Site Toxic Control Inc.
NEWS
June 8, 1989 | LEE HARRIS, Times Staff Writer
The state has approved a $320,000 grant to a Santa Ana company to build a water-treatment plant at one of the South Gate's six wells that has been closed by pollution. Ultrox International, a manufacturer of water-treatment systems, would construct and run the treatment plant at a city well that has been shut down since November, 1985. The city is being asked to contribute an estimated $80,000 to the project. The City Council is expected to discuss the project at its regular meeting June 12 and sign an agreement near the end of the month with Ultrox to get the project started, said Rollie D. Berry, director of public works for South Gate.
NEWS
November 15, 1990
City and state officials have unveiled a new water-treatment system designed to clean up one of South Gate's six contaminated wells that have been closed. Ultrox International, a Santa Ana company, constructed and installed the system, which uses ultraviolet light and ozone gases to purify the water, according to company representatives.
NEWS
December 24, 1987 | LEE HARRIS, Times Staff Writer
The city has joined the state Department of Health Services in an experimental project to cleanse well water contaminated by chemicals that have forced the closure of five city wells. A demonstration of the treatment process was held Tuesday at municipal well No. 18, which was closed in January, 1986. Tests had shown that tetrachloroethylene (also known as perchloroethylene or PCE) exceeded the state health services's recommended "action level."
BUSINESS
March 4, 1991 | MARTHA GROVES, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Amgen Inc., a biotechnology company based in Thousand Oaks, slowed its hiring of scientists in recent months, but not because of the recession. "We couldn't find places to put them," said Mark J. Brand, a spokesman for the fast-growing company, which has made a splash in the medical community with a gene-spliced protein that treats chronic anemia in patients with kidney disease.
NEWS
June 8, 1989 | LEE HARRIS, Times Staff Writer
The state has approved a $320,000 grant to a Santa Ana company to build a water-treatment plant at one of the South Gate's six wells that has been closed by pollution. Ultrox International, a manufacturer of water-treatment systems, would construct and run the treatment plant at a city well that has been shut down since November, 1985. The city is being asked to contribute an estimated $80,000 to the project. The City Council is expected to discuss the project at its regular meeting June 12 and sign an agreement near the end of the month with Ultrox to get the project started, said Rollie D. Berry, director of public works for South Gate.
BUSINESS
January 12, 1989
Ultrox International, a Santa Ana water detoxification company, and On-Site Toxic Control Inc., a Colorado corporation, said Wednesday that they have merged in a stock swap. On-Site Toxic Control, formerly Augusta Financial Inc., will operate Ultrox as a wholly owned subsidiary. The Santa Ana firm will retain the Ultrox name and customers, said David Fletcher, Ultrox president. None of Ultrox's 16 employees are expected to be affected by the merger, Fletcher said.
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