Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsUlysses S Grant
IN THE NEWS

Ulysses S Grant

FEATURED ARTICLES
OPINION
March 8, 2010 | By Joan Waugh
Shame on the 14 Republican congressmen who last week proposed substituting Ronald Reagan for Ulysses S. Grant on the $50 bill. Their action suggests they need a history lesson about the Northern general who won the Civil War and went on to lead the country. Having enjoyed brief acclaim during the Mexican-American War, the onetime farmer was toiling in obscurity when he answered President Lincoln's call for volunteers in 1861. He rapidly won fame in the Western theater, scoring decisive and morale-raising victories at Shiloh, Vicksburg and Chattanooga.
ARTICLES BY DATE
ENTERTAINMENT
May 20, 2012 | By Scott Martelle, Special to Tribune newspapers
A Disposition to Be Rich How a Small-Town Pastor's Son Ruined an American President, Brought on a Wall Street Crash, and Made Himself the Best-Hated Man in the United States Geoffrey C. Ward Alfred A. Knopf: 415 pp., $28.95. In 1863, the young Ferdinand Ward was alone with his mother in their parsonage in Geneseo, N.Y., his minister father and older brother both off to war and his older sister visiting relatives out of town. Diphtheria swept through the village, killing friends and neighbors, and each mail delivery carried the risk of disaster - would it include a notice that one of the Ward men had been killed?
Advertisement
ENTERTAINMENT
May 4, 2002 | HOWARD ROSENBERG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
If asked to name the most popular U.S. figure of the 19th century, most Americans would probably answer Abraham Lincoln. Yet one after another, experts in a fine new PBS documentary hand that distinction to the man buried in Grant's tomb. The usual facile definition of Ulysses S. Grant as a gifted Civil War general and inept president is transcended in this two-part effort spanning four hours.
OPINION
March 8, 2010 | By Joan Waugh
Shame on the 14 Republican congressmen who last week proposed substituting Ronald Reagan for Ulysses S. Grant on the $50 bill. Their action suggests they need a history lesson about the Northern general who won the Civil War and went on to lead the country. Having enjoyed brief acclaim during the Mexican-American War, the onetime farmer was toiling in obscurity when he answered President Lincoln's call for volunteers in 1861. He rapidly won fame in the Western theater, scoring decisive and morale-raising victories at Shiloh, Vicksburg and Chattanooga.
NEWS
October 16, 1994 | Associated Press
The descendants of President Ulysses S. Grant threatened Saturday to move the bodies of the Civil War hero and his wife out of Grant's Tomb unless the blighted site gets a multimillion-dollar renovation. The family, represented by the President's great-great-grandson, Ulysses Grant Dietz, delivered the same message to the National Park Service at a meeting Friday. The tomb, on Manhattan's Upper West Side, has become a magnet for the homeless, graffiti and drug use in recent years.
NEWS
June 28, 2000 | MIKE DOWNEY
Ulysses S. Grant was 46 when elected president of the United States for the first time, and only 54 upon leaving office. "Grant was a young guy, not that doughty face we know from a $50 bill," says Ev Ehrlich, the author of a new book about our 18th president. Bill Clinton was 46 when first elected, and will likewise be 54 come the next president's inauguration day.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 22, 1999
Richard Goodwin's Feb. 17 commentary on Lyndon B. Johnson suffers from selective amnesia. True, LBJ saw through the nation's despicable racist traditions and effected the passage of the great civil rights legislation from 1964-1967. But LBJ and his same cadre of advisors escalated the Vietnam War, and did so in a surreptitious manner, secretly paying for it with an inflation scourge that gutted the government's ability to carry out the Great Society programs. Truth be told, this nation never truly tried to end poverty, for if we did so it would end--the resources are there.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 11, 2003 | TIM RUTTEN
Americans will forgive their celebrities nearly anything but silence. Though she has made her life in politics, Hillary Rodham Clinton is every inch a product of that culture of celebrity, which -- like encroaching seawater -- has infiltrated and brackened the wells of our politics over these past few decades.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 25, 2009 | By Julia Keller
When she was 10, Joan Waugh did what millions of eager readers have done over the decades since its 1936 publication: She read Margaret Mitchell's "Gone With the Wind" again and again, admiring Scarlett O'Hara's resourcefulness and pluck, swooning over a handsome scalawag named Rhett Butler and savoring the novel's descriptions of the South's valiant, doomed struggle against the hated Yankees. Then Waugh grew up, physically and intellectually. She became a history professor at UCLA, writing books about 19th century America such as "Unsentimental Reformer: The Life of Josephine Shaw Lowell" (1998)
OPINION
June 18, 2004
I take issue with Lynne Foringer's June 14 letter, in which she states that Ulysses S. Grant is perhaps the least important person represented today on U.S. currency. Promoted to the rank of lieutenant general in 1864, a post not held since George Washington, Grant commanded the Union army in order to preserve the Union. "The rebels are our countrymen again," he told his staff during the surrender of Gen. Robert E. Lee. Without his military success, his generous and nonvindictive terms of surrender given to the Confederacy and his zeal as U.S. president to protect "citizens of every race and color" in the "peaceful enjoyment of the rights guaranteed to them by the Constitution," we would not be the present-day United States.
NATIONAL
March 3, 2010 | By Richard Simon
Ronald Reagan is honored by, among other things, an airport, a freeway, an aircraft carrier and -- ironically for a critic of big government -- one of the biggest federal buildings in Washington. Now, some of the late president's admirers are launching a new effort to add another honor: printing his likeness on a $50 bill in place of Ulysses S. Grant's. In polls of presidential scholars, Reagan consistently outranks Grant, said Rep. Patrick T. McHenry (R-N.C.), who introduced legislation to make the change.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 25, 2009 | By Julia Keller
When she was 10, Joan Waugh did what millions of eager readers have done over the decades since its 1936 publication: She read Margaret Mitchell's "Gone With the Wind" again and again, admiring Scarlett O'Hara's resourcefulness and pluck, swooning over a handsome scalawag named Rhett Butler and savoring the novel's descriptions of the South's valiant, doomed struggle against the hated Yankees. Then Waugh grew up, physically and intellectually. She became a history professor at UCLA, writing books about 19th century America such as "Unsentimental Reformer: The Life of Josephine Shaw Lowell" (1998)
OPINION
June 18, 2004
I take issue with Lynne Foringer's June 14 letter, in which she states that Ulysses S. Grant is perhaps the least important person represented today on U.S. currency. Promoted to the rank of lieutenant general in 1864, a post not held since George Washington, Grant commanded the Union army in order to preserve the Union. "The rebels are our countrymen again," he told his staff during the surrender of Gen. Robert E. Lee. Without his military success, his generous and nonvindictive terms of surrender given to the Confederacy and his zeal as U.S. president to protect "citizens of every race and color" in the "peaceful enjoyment of the rights guaranteed to them by the Constitution," we would not be the present-day United States.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 11, 2003 | TIM RUTTEN
Americans will forgive their celebrities nearly anything but silence. Though she has made her life in politics, Hillary Rodham Clinton is every inch a product of that culture of celebrity, which -- like encroaching seawater -- has infiltrated and brackened the wells of our politics over these past few decades.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 4, 2002 | HOWARD ROSENBERG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
If asked to name the most popular U.S. figure of the 19th century, most Americans would probably answer Abraham Lincoln. Yet one after another, experts in a fine new PBS documentary hand that distinction to the man buried in Grant's tomb. The usual facile definition of Ulysses S. Grant as a gifted Civil War general and inept president is transcended in this two-part effort spanning four hours.
NEWS
June 28, 2000 | MIKE DOWNEY
Ulysses S. Grant was 46 when elected president of the United States for the first time, and only 54 upon leaving office. "Grant was a young guy, not that doughty face we know from a $50 bill," says Ev Ehrlich, the author of a new book about our 18th president. Bill Clinton was 46 when first elected, and will likewise be 54 come the next president's inauguration day.
NATIONAL
March 3, 2010 | By Richard Simon
Ronald Reagan is honored by, among other things, an airport, a freeway, an aircraft carrier and -- ironically for a critic of big government -- one of the biggest federal buildings in Washington. Now, some of the late president's admirers are launching a new effort to add another honor: printing his likeness on a $50 bill in place of Ulysses S. Grant's. In polls of presidential scholars, Reagan consistently outranks Grant, said Rep. Patrick T. McHenry (R-N.C.), who introduced legislation to make the change.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 20, 2012 | By Scott Martelle, Special to Tribune newspapers
A Disposition to Be Rich How a Small-Town Pastor's Son Ruined an American President, Brought on a Wall Street Crash, and Made Himself the Best-Hated Man in the United States Geoffrey C. Ward Alfred A. Knopf: 415 pp., $28.95. In 1863, the young Ferdinand Ward was alone with his mother in their parsonage in Geneseo, N.Y., his minister father and older brother both off to war and his older sister visiting relatives out of town. Diphtheria swept through the village, killing friends and neighbors, and each mail delivery carried the risk of disaster - would it include a notice that one of the Ward men had been killed?
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 22, 1999
Richard Goodwin's Feb. 17 commentary on Lyndon B. Johnson suffers from selective amnesia. True, LBJ saw through the nation's despicable racist traditions and effected the passage of the great civil rights legislation from 1964-1967. But LBJ and his same cadre of advisors escalated the Vietnam War, and did so in a surreptitious manner, secretly paying for it with an inflation scourge that gutted the government's ability to carry out the Great Society programs. Truth be told, this nation never truly tried to end poverty, for if we did so it would end--the resources are there.
NEWS
October 16, 1994 | Associated Press
The descendants of President Ulysses S. Grant threatened Saturday to move the bodies of the Civil War hero and his wife out of Grant's Tomb unless the blighted site gets a multimillion-dollar renovation. The family, represented by the President's great-great-grandson, Ulysses Grant Dietz, delivered the same message to the National Park Service at a meeting Friday. The tomb, on Manhattan's Upper West Side, has become a magnet for the homeless, graffiti and drug use in recent years.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|