Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsUlysses Spacecraft
IN THE NEWS

Ulysses Spacecraft

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
February 9, 1992 | From the Associated Press
The Ulysses spacecraft boomeranged past Jupiter on Saturday, flying through deadly radiation and an orbiting ring of volcanic debris on its way to study the sun. "This is a historic moment for Ulysses," said Ed Smith, NASA's project scientist at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory in Pasadena. "It successfully passed Jupiter. . . . We're ready to begin our primary mission to explore the poles of the sun." Ulysses began its $750-million mission Oct.
ARTICLES BY DATE
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 12, 1992 | JUDY PASTERNAK, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Emerging unscathed from its wild ride through giant Jupiter's intense radiation belt, the robot spacecraft Ulysses is painting a new, more complex picture of the vast magnetic field ringing the planet. The field extends 5 million miles from the bright side of the planet, about twice as far as expected, and is also much flatter than astronomers had imagined, U.S. and European researchers announced Tuesday at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory in Pasadena.
Advertisement
NEWS
October 5, 1990 | LEE DYE, TIMES SCIENCE WRITER
Some photographers will do anything for the right camera angle. The Ulysses spacecraft, scheduled to be launched aboard the space shuttle Discovery Saturday morning, will have to fly faster than any other device built by human hands, and it will have to travel nearly 2 billion miles through the back yard of the solar system to reach its destination. When it finally arrives, it will be twice as far from the sun as it was while sitting on its launching pad.
NEWS
February 9, 1992 | From the Associated Press
The Ulysses spacecraft boomeranged past Jupiter on Saturday, flying through deadly radiation and an orbiting ring of volcanic debris on its way to study the sun. "This is a historic moment for Ulysses," said Ed Smith, NASA's project scientist at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory in Pasadena. "It successfully passed Jupiter. . . . We're ready to begin our primary mission to explore the poles of the sun." Ulysses began its $750-million mission Oct.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 1, 1992 | LEE DYE, TIMES SCIENCE WRITER
The Ulysses spacecraft reached Jupiter's neighborhood and began a maneuver to use the giant planet's gravity to fling itself into an orbit that will carry it over the poles of the sun--the first spacecraft ever to achieve that. The $750-million NASA-European Space Agency craft will make its closest approach to Jupiter next Saturday but there will be no pictures because it is not carrying cameras. Instead, the craft is loaded with instruments that will study the sun in 1994 and 1995.
NEWS
October 7, 1990 | LEE DYE, TIMES SCIENCE WRITER
Five months of frustration came to a dramatic end here Saturday when the space shuttle Discovery blasted into orbit on an international mission to explore the polar regions of the sun. "There's a lot of smiling faces up here," Discovery commander Richard N. Richards, 44, told Mission Control soon after the launch at 4:47 a.m. PDT. There also were a few smiles on the ground.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 2, 1990 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
A plutonium-powered satellite that will be launched from the shuttle Discovery this fall to explore the sun's poles poses little health risk in the event of an accident, space officials said last week. Ulysses' scientific instruments will be powered by a radioisotope thermoelectric generator, which converts heat from decaying plutonium into electricity.
NEWS
October 6, 1990 | LEE DYE, TIMES SCIENCE WRITER
A federal judge Friday cleared the way for the launching of the space shuttle Discovery early today after ruling that three environmental groups had failed to demonstrate that the launching could result in radioactive contamination over much of the East Coast. The Discovery, scheduled for liftoff at 4:35 a.m. PDT, will carry the nuclear-powered Ulysses into orbit and then send the robotic spacecraft on a 2-billion-mile journey to the sun by way of Jupiter.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 11, 1990 | LEE DYE, TIMES SCIENCE WRITER
With its solar probe safely on its way, the space shuttle Discovery was kissed by the rising sun as it dropped out of a clear sky and glided to a flawless landing here Wednesday morning. It was a cold (38 degrees), crisp moment when the shuttle touched down at 6:57 a.m, but the successful mission warmed the hearts of space officials who feel they have been snakebitten several times in recent months.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 12, 1992 | JUDY PASTERNAK, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Emerging unscathed from its wild ride through giant Jupiter's intense radiation belt, the robot spacecraft Ulysses is painting a new, more complex picture of the vast magnetic field ringing the planet. The field extends 5 million miles from the bright side of the planet, about twice as far as expected, and is also much flatter than astronomers had imagined, U.S. and European researchers announced Tuesday at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory in Pasadena.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 1, 1992 | LEE DYE, TIMES SCIENCE WRITER
The Ulysses spacecraft reached Jupiter's neighborhood and began a maneuver to use the giant planet's gravity to fling itself into an orbit that will carry it over the poles of the sun--the first spacecraft ever to achieve that. The $750-million NASA-European Space Agency craft will make its closest approach to Jupiter next Saturday but there will be no pictures because it is not carrying cameras. Instead, the craft is loaded with instruments that will study the sun in 1994 and 1995.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 11, 1990 | LEE DYE, TIMES SCIENCE WRITER
With its solar probe safely on its way, the space shuttle Discovery was kissed by the rising sun as it dropped out of a clear sky and glided to a flawless landing here Wednesday morning. It was a cold (38 degrees), crisp moment when the shuttle touched down at 6:57 a.m, but the successful mission warmed the hearts of space officials who feel they have been snakebitten several times in recent months.
NEWS
October 8, 1990 | From Associated Press
Discovery's astronauts, their primary job behind them, started a small fire aboard the space shuttle on Sunday as part of an experiment to study the spread of flames in space. The solar probe Ulysses, meanwhile, sped safely toward Jupiter at a record-setting 34,130 m.p.h. Discovery's five-man crew started the satellite on its roundabout journey of 1.86 billion miles shortly after liftoff Saturday.
NEWS
October 7, 1990 | LEE DYE, TIMES SCIENCE WRITER
Five months of frustration came to a dramatic end here Saturday when the space shuttle Discovery blasted into orbit on an international mission to explore the polar regions of the sun. "There's a lot of smiling faces up here," Discovery commander Richard N. Richards, 44, told Mission Control soon after the launch at 4:47 a.m. PDT. There also were a few smiles on the ground.
NEWS
October 6, 1990 | LEE DYE, TIMES SCIENCE WRITER
A federal judge Friday cleared the way for the launching of the space shuttle Discovery early today after ruling that three environmental groups had failed to demonstrate that the launching could result in radioactive contamination over much of the East Coast. The Discovery, scheduled for liftoff at 4:35 a.m. PDT, will carry the nuclear-powered Ulysses into orbit and then send the robotic spacecraft on a 2-billion-mile journey to the sun by way of Jupiter.
NEWS
October 5, 1990 | LEE DYE, TIMES SCIENCE WRITER
Some photographers will do anything for the right camera angle. The Ulysses spacecraft, scheduled to be launched aboard the space shuttle Discovery Saturday morning, will have to fly faster than any other device built by human hands, and it will have to travel nearly 2 billion miles through the back yard of the solar system to reach its destination. When it finally arrives, it will be twice as far from the sun as it was while sitting on its launching pad.
NEWS
October 8, 1990 | From Associated Press
Discovery's astronauts, their primary job behind them, started a small fire aboard the space shuttle on Sunday as part of an experiment to study the spread of flames in space. The solar probe Ulysses, meanwhile, sped safely toward Jupiter at a record-setting 34,130 m.p.h. Discovery's five-man crew started the satellite on its roundabout journey of 1.86 billion miles shortly after liftoff Saturday.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 4, 1994 | From Associated Press
The Ulysses spacecraft has found the sun to have a uniform magnetic field rather than magnetic poles, according to NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory. The spacecraft's finding differs greatly from the way the sun's magnetic field appears in Earth-based observations, which indicate the sun has magnetic poles. Ulysses did not detect any magnetic poles, JPL said. Ulysses, the first spacecraft to study the sun's high latitudes, completed its pass over the sun's southern pole on Nov. 5.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 2, 1990 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
A plutonium-powered satellite that will be launched from the shuttle Discovery this fall to explore the sun's poles poses little health risk in the event of an accident, space officials said last week. Ulysses' scientific instruments will be powered by a radioisotope thermoelectric generator, which converts heat from decaying plutonium into electricity.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|