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Umaru Yar Adua

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OPINION
April 24, 2007
IF NIGERIA IS A yardstick for sub-Saharan Africa, then Africa is moving sideways. Former U.S. Secretary of State Madeleine Albright spoke for many international observers when she described Saturday's national elections in the continent's most populous country as "a step backward." From a technical standpoint, Albright was correct. Polls opened late, voters were intimidated, some ballot boxes were stuffed and others disappeared.
ARTICLES BY DATE
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 7, 2010 | By Robyn Dixon, Los Angeles Times
Nigerian President Umaru Yar'Adua, who died Wednesday night at 58, was a leader with the giant ambition of dragging Africa's most populous nation from a backward, corrupt state to an advanced global power. He was too ill and politically weak to attack the entrenched corruption of a venal political elite – or to solve Nigeria's severe infrastructure problems, particularly in the electricity sector. Yar'Adua, who had suffered a kidney ailment since the 1990s, had not been seen in public since travelling to Saudi Arabia in November for treatment for pericarditis, or inflammation of the sac around the heart.
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WORLD
April 26, 2007 | Robyn Dixon, Times Staff Writer
Nigeria's president-elect, Umaru Yar Adua, spelled out an ambitious program for his first 100 days in office, promising to come up with a plan to stabilize the troubled Niger Delta, where kidnappings of foreign oil workers by disaffected militants are increasingly common. Brushing aside widespread criticism that the election Saturday had not met even basic democratic standards, Yar Adua promised a government of "national reconciliation" and invited major opposition parties to participate.
WORLD
May 7, 2010 | By Robyn Dixon, Los Angeles Times
Nigeria buried its president on Thursday and swore in his successor, Goodluck Jonathan, amid fears of a debilitating power struggle in the ruling party. Politicians hailed the smooth power transfer, but the death of President Umaru Yar'Adua on Wednesday night after a five-month illness could lead to infighting between northerners and southerners in the ruling People's Democratic Party should Jonathan, a southerner, decide to run for the presidency in elections due next year. Jonathan's candidacy would shatter an unwritten deal in the PDP that rotates the presidency for eight years to a leader from the mainly Christian south and eight years to someone from the mainly Muslim north.
WORLD
March 17, 2010 | By Robyn Dixon
The youngest victim of the massacre was a baby, villagers said, born just a couple of hours before the attack on Kuru Karama. There was not much warning that January morning, only the call to prayer ringing out at the wrong time, 10 a.m., a sure sign of trouble. The town had been surrounded by mobs of Christian men, who, residents said, were seeking to slaughter as many Muslims as possible. Police said 326 people were killed in the attack on the village near Jos in central Nigeria.
WORLD
February 25, 2010 | By Robyn Dixon
Nigerian President Umaru Yar'Adua flew home to Abuja early Wednesday after three months in a Saudi hospital, but his secretive return raised concerns about a deepening power struggle in the ruling party as well as his long-term health. Two weeks ago Yar'Adua's deputy, Goodluck Jonathan, was appointed acting president by the legislature in a move many called unconstitutional. Yar'Adua's return came one day after Jonathan sent a series of official appointments to the Senate.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 7, 2010 | By Robyn Dixon, Los Angeles Times
Nigerian President Umaru Yar'Adua, who died Wednesday night at 58, was a leader with the giant ambition of dragging Africa's most populous nation from a backward, corrupt state to an advanced global power. He was too ill and politically weak to attack the entrenched corruption of a venal political elite – or to solve Nigeria's severe infrastructure problems, particularly in the electricity sector. Yar'Adua, who had suffered a kidney ailment since the 1990s, had not been seen in public since travelling to Saudi Arabia in November for treatment for pericarditis, or inflammation of the sac around the heart.
WORLD
February 11, 2010 | By Segun Adeyemi and Robyn Dixon, Reporting from Johannesburg, South Africa, and Lagos, Nigeria
Reporting from Johannesburg, South Africa, and Lagos, Nigeria Robyn Dixon -- Good luck, Jonathan. Nigerian lawmakers seeking to end months of drift transferred the powers of ailing President Umaru Yar'Adua to his deputy, Goodluck Jonathan, on Tuesday. But critics say the move is unconstitutional and threatens to upset a delicate balance between Christian southerners and Muslim northerners. Nigeria, Africa's most populous country, has a long history of political instability, repression and military coups.
WORLD
May 30, 2007 | Robyn Dixon, Times Staff Writer
Umaru Yar'Adua was sworn in Tuesday as Nigeria's president, pledging to be a humble "servant-leader" and to push through political reform after his election last month was widely criticized by international and local observers. In a muted style markedly different from that of his ebullient and flamboyant predecessor, Olusegun Obasanjo, Yar'Adua said he would fight poverty and corruption and reduce violent crime in the oil-rich Niger Delta.
WORLD
March 4, 2010 | By Robyn Dixon
Nigeria's ailing president may still be flat on his back in the ambulance that rushed him from the airport to his residence after his secretive return last week from Saudi Arabia, where he was treated for heart-related health issues. Or sitting in a hard-backed chair in his official residence, while nieces, nephews and grandchildren tear up and down the stairs. Or working out daily on an exercise bike and walking up and down stairs. Any of the scenarios, reported by Nigerian newspapers or by President Umaru Yar'Adua's supporters, could be true, false or somewhere between, but they're all that Nigerians have to go on: The president has not addressed the public since he left the country for treatment in Jidda, Saudi Arabia, for pericarditis, inflammation of the lining around the heart, in November, not even after he returned Feb. 24. One thing that does seem clear is that since the president's return, acting President Goodluck Jonathan has been unsuccessful in several attempts to see him. Yar'Adua's supporters put this down to the president's introverted personality and insist that he's on his feet and doing well.
WORLD
March 17, 2010 | By Robyn Dixon
The youngest victim of the massacre was a baby, villagers said, born just a couple of hours before the attack on Kuru Karama. There was not much warning that January morning, only the call to prayer ringing out at the wrong time, 10 a.m., a sure sign of trouble. The town had been surrounded by mobs of Christian men, who, residents said, were seeking to slaughter as many Muslims as possible. Police said 326 people were killed in the attack on the village near Jos in central Nigeria.
WORLD
March 4, 2010 | By Robyn Dixon
Nigeria's ailing president may still be flat on his back in the ambulance that rushed him from the airport to his residence after his secretive return last week from Saudi Arabia, where he was treated for heart-related health issues. Or sitting in a hard-backed chair in his official residence, while nieces, nephews and grandchildren tear up and down the stairs. Or working out daily on an exercise bike and walking up and down stairs. Any of the scenarios, reported by Nigerian newspapers or by President Umaru Yar'Adua's supporters, could be true, false or somewhere between, but they're all that Nigerians have to go on: The president has not addressed the public since he left the country for treatment in Jidda, Saudi Arabia, for pericarditis, inflammation of the lining around the heart, in November, not even after he returned Feb. 24. One thing that does seem clear is that since the president's return, acting President Goodluck Jonathan has been unsuccessful in several attempts to see him. Yar'Adua's supporters put this down to the president's introverted personality and insist that he's on his feet and doing well.
WORLD
February 25, 2010 | By Robyn Dixon
Nigerian President Umaru Yar'Adua flew home to Abuja early Wednesday after three months in a Saudi hospital, but his secretive return raised concerns about a deepening power struggle in the ruling party as well as his long-term health. Two weeks ago Yar'Adua's deputy, Goodluck Jonathan, was appointed acting president by the legislature in a move many called unconstitutional. Yar'Adua's return came one day after Jonathan sent a series of official appointments to the Senate.
WORLD
February 11, 2010 | By Segun Adeyemi and Robyn Dixon, Reporting from Johannesburg, South Africa, and Lagos, Nigeria
Reporting from Johannesburg, South Africa, and Lagos, Nigeria Robyn Dixon -- Good luck, Jonathan. Nigerian lawmakers seeking to end months of drift transferred the powers of ailing President Umaru Yar'Adua to his deputy, Goodluck Jonathan, on Tuesday. But critics say the move is unconstitutional and threatens to upset a delicate balance between Christian southerners and Muslim northerners. Nigeria, Africa's most populous country, has a long history of political instability, repression and military coups.
WORLD
May 30, 2007 | Robyn Dixon, Times Staff Writer
Umaru Yar'Adua was sworn in Tuesday as Nigeria's president, pledging to be a humble "servant-leader" and to push through political reform after his election last month was widely criticized by international and local observers. In a muted style markedly different from that of his ebullient and flamboyant predecessor, Olusegun Obasanjo, Yar'Adua said he would fight poverty and corruption and reduce violent crime in the oil-rich Niger Delta.
WORLD
April 26, 2007 | Robyn Dixon, Times Staff Writer
Nigeria's president-elect, Umaru Yar Adua, spelled out an ambitious program for his first 100 days in office, promising to come up with a plan to stabilize the troubled Niger Delta, where kidnappings of foreign oil workers by disaffected militants are increasingly common. Brushing aside widespread criticism that the election Saturday had not met even basic democratic standards, Yar Adua promised a government of "national reconciliation" and invited major opposition parties to participate.
WORLD
May 7, 2010 | By Robyn Dixon, Los Angeles Times
Nigeria buried its president on Thursday and swore in his successor, Goodluck Jonathan, amid fears of a debilitating power struggle in the ruling party. Politicians hailed the smooth power transfer, but the death of President Umaru Yar'Adua on Wednesday night after a five-month illness could lead to infighting between northerners and southerners in the ruling People's Democratic Party should Jonathan, a southerner, decide to run for the presidency in elections due next year. Jonathan's candidacy would shatter an unwritten deal in the PDP that rotates the presidency for eight years to a leader from the mainly Christian south and eight years to someone from the mainly Muslim north.
BUSINESS
June 21, 2007 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
The first day of a general strike brought much of Nigeria to a standstill, and unions threatened to halt oil exports from Africa's top producer unless the government reversed an increase in fuel prices. Unions vowed to sustain the strike indefinitely despite a series of concessions offered by President Umaru Yar'Adua, who faces the first major test of his government three weeks after taking office.
OPINION
April 24, 2007
IF NIGERIA IS A yardstick for sub-Saharan Africa, then Africa is moving sideways. Former U.S. Secretary of State Madeleine Albright spoke for many international observers when she described Saturday's national elections in the continent's most populous country as "a step backward." From a technical standpoint, Albright was correct. Polls opened late, voters were intimidated, some ballot boxes were stuffed and others disappeared.
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