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Umbanda Religion

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 26, 1988 | WILLIAM R. LONG, Times Staff Writer
Manoel Alves de Souza, a Rio lawyer, was a patient in a mental hospital in 1970 when he took the path of Umbanda. One of the hospital's psychiatrists encouraged him to go to an Umbanda worship center for ritual treatment of his illness, Souza recalled. In one ritual, Souza was placed within a circle of fire; in others, he was given herbal baths. Since then, he has been free of mental disturbances and is a faithful believer in Umbanda, he said in an interview. "It helped me a lot.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 26, 1988 | WILLIAM R. LONG, Times Staff Writer
Manoel Alves de Souza, a Rio lawyer, was a patient in a mental hospital in 1970 when he took the path of Umbanda. One of the hospital's psychiatrists encouraged him to go to an Umbanda worship center for ritual treatment of his illness, Souza recalled. In one ritual, Souza was placed within a circle of fire; in others, he was given herbal baths. Since then, he has been free of mental disturbances and is a faithful believer in Umbanda, he said in an interview. "It helped me a lot.
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NEWS
August 8, 1998 | SEBASTIAN ROTELLA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
There is a magic word that Brazilians use to describe their talent for artful compromise. The word jeito translates roughly as a knack for solving problems, whether bureaucratic entanglements or social conflicts. It applies to the melding of religions that allows tens of millions of Brazilians to call themselves Roman Catholics while practicing rites of African origin.
NEWS
April 9, 1988 | WILLIAM R. LONG, Times Staff Writer
The doorman intercepted Geusa Maria Cardoso, 21, as she returned to her apartment building one day in March. Use the service entrance, he ordered. Cardoso is mulata, as a woman of mixed-race is called in Brazil. Her complexion reflects her African ancestry, and it caught the doorman's eye that day. He explained later that he thought she was a servant. "She is not a servant," protested Celia Luz, Cardoso's white foster mother, "and even if she were, this discrimination is unacceptable."
NEWS
February 3, 1998 | SEBASTIAN ROTELLA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
On Sunday nights, the drummers of Barrio Sur assemble by firelight at an intersection in the historic black neighborhood in a tranquil corner of South America. Flames dance in a gutter bonfire lighted to tone the hides of the drums. Bottles of red wine change hands. Children cavort. Rows of drummers pound down the street in a blur of muscle, sweat and sound, filling the night with an African-derived rhythm known as candombe.
TRAVEL
October 20, 2002 | Shirley Skeel, Special to The Times
Nir Etz-Hadar leaned over the deck rail, looking down on a wharf overrun with hemp bags, crates of Coca-Cola, oil barrels and Brazilians as I approached the riverboat Sao Francisco. He grimaced and waved. "Expect the worst," he called out. I did. A week earlier, two Danes at my hotel in Manaus, a steaming city in the heart of the Brazilian jungle, had described the banana boat ride up the Amazon River as a trip they would "never do again."
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