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Umberto Boccioni

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October 23, 1988 | WILLIAM WILSON
Of all the early radical modern European art movements of the century, none reveled in its own high-spirited attack on the sacred cows of the past more than Italian Futurism. It was founded in Milan in 1909 by the poet Filippo Tomaso Marinetti who styled himself "The caffeine of Europe."
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October 23, 1988 | WILLIAM WILSON
Of all the early radical modern European art movements of the century, none reveled in its own high-spirited attack on the sacred cows of the past more than Italian Futurism. It was founded in Milan in 1909 by the poet Filippo Tomaso Marinetti who styled himself "The caffeine of Europe."
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ENTERTAINMENT
March 8, 1990 | SHAUNA SNOW, Arts and entertainment reports from The Times, national and international news services and the nation's press
Paintings Removed: Nineteen paintings by founders of the Futurist movement were withdrawn from Milan's Brera art museum and put in a bank vault because of security fears, the owners said Wednesday. The family of the late Riccardo Jucker, who donated the paintings by Umberto Boccioni, Giacomo Balla and Carlo Carra, said they would rather pay bank custody charges than "risk a nasty accident." Two paintings by other artists have been stolen from the Brera museum in the past three years.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 1, 2005 | From Associated Press
Tate Modern, the rousingly successful London art gallery in a converted power plant, plans to rehang its collection next spring for the first time since it opened five years ago. The four main exhibits will revolve around the themes of Cubism, Surrealism, Abstract Expressionism and Minimalism, replacing the current divisions of landscape, still-life, history and nude works.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 11, 2001 | NICOLAI OUROUSSOFF, TIMES ARCHITECTURE CRITIC
If part of building a career is timing, then few architects have had worse timing than Michele Saee. After a brief stint working in the office of Los Angeles architect Thom Mayne, Saee struck out on his own in 1985. By the end of the decade, Saee had completed several elegant renovation projects in L.A. and seemed poised on the edge of local stardom. But in 1991, the economy began to founder. Soon, Saee was just another unemployed architect scraping by for work.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 23, 2001 | Nicolai Ouroussoff
For years, art institutions, corporate patrons and now even government bureaucrats have been mining architecture's growing list of international celebrities, bent on producing the kind of flamboyant icon that can up their cultural status. Architects call this the "Bilbao effect," a reference to the growing hype that has surrounded the profession's stars since the opening of Frank O. Gehry's celebrated Guggenheim Museum in Bilbao, Spain, in 1997. Not even the terrorist attacks of Sept.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 15, 1990 | CATHY CURTIS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Suppose you decided to visit a remote outpost in a country whose language was utterly foreign to you. If you hired a guide, you'd surely want this person to be able to communicate with you, even if only in rudimentary sign language. For most viewers, conceptual art is about as "foreign" as art gets. It's one thing for a commercial gallery exhibit to murmur inscrutably to a coterie of knowledgeable followers.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 11, 1989 | WILLIAM WILSON
The fabled jewel of the Adriatic is a tangled Byzantine paradox. Its murky yellow-green canals are as enchanted as a Joseph Cornell box, its imperious hotel concierges as parsimonious as dirt farmers. The ambiance is at once as cheery as a carnival and as devious as the narrow streets that meander catlike through crumbling monuments. Between the Bellinis in the Academia and the Tintorettos in the School of San Rocco, there is enough old art to sate a battalion of starving scholars, but Venice also perversely insists on being a center for modern art. It seems to want to do everything imaginable to attract yet another million tourists and then complain that the multitudes are literally wearing out the cobbled sidewalks.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 17, 2004 | Christopher Knight, Times Staff Writer
Intellectually, one can know the deep importance of something while forgetting the awesome power that comes with actually experiencing it. So it has been with the collection of painting and sculpture assembled during the last 75 years by the Museum of Modern Art. Common knowledge asserts its unparalleled quality, though most of it has been out of sight during the museum's 2 1/2 -year expansion project.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 22, 2004 | Nicolai Ouroussoff, Times Staff Writer
Zaha Hadid, whose dynamic designs often seem to defy laws of gravity, has won the Pritzker Prize, architecture's highest honor. It is the first time the prize has been given to a woman in the award's 25-year history. Based in London, Hadid has long been considered one of architecture's most precocious talents. Her exquisite architectural renderings -- many created while she was in her 30s -- made her an international cult figure before she had completed a single building.
NEWS
June 6, 2000 | MARNELL JAMESON, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
"There is only one good, knowledge, and only one evil, ignorance." --Socrates, circa 400 BC * Hungry for knowledge, they come, many of them, an hour before class. They are poor and working poor. They are immigrants, ex-gang members, high school dropouts, victims of political unrest, unwed mothers.
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