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Umbilical Cord

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BUSINESS
December 29, 1995
Utah Medical Products said it has received approval from the U.S. Food and Drug Administration for its Cordguard II umbilical cord clamping device. The disposable device clamps and cuts the umbilical cord and collects an uncontaminated blood sample immediately after birth. It was developed by Huntington Beach-based OB Tech Inc., whose assets were acquired by Utah Medical in December 1993.
ARTICLES BY DATE
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 2, 2014 | By Thomas Curwen
Anna May, a dispatcher for the Simi Valley Police Department, answered the 911 call. The teenage boy on the line sounded calm but nervous; he was in the car with his mother. She had hoped they would get to the hospital, but they weren't going to make it in time. His mother was going to have a baby, he said. Contractions had begun, and she was already pushing. They had just pulled off the 118 Freeway into the parking lot of a gas station at the corner of Stearns and Bernard streets in Simi Valley just after 1:00 p.m. Saturday.
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NEWS
October 11, 2010
Public or private? When it comes to banking of umbilical cord blood, the choice is far from clear. The debate revolves around whether parents should "privately" save their child's cord blood or donate it to a public cord blood bank. Blood recovered from a baby's umbilical cord may be saved to use for a future stem cell transplant. Many organizations, including the American Academy of Pediatrics , think it "unwise" for parents to go the private route. The National Cord Blood Program estimates that fees to bank blood privately run about $1,500 up front and then $100 per month.
WORLD
November 18, 2013 | By Robyn Dixon
JOHANNESBURG, South Africa - Inside the Nelson Mandela Center of Memory, opened Monday by President Jacob Zuma, a small fragment of compacted mud is all that remains of the hut where Nelson Mandela was born in Mvezo village in the Eastern Cape 95 years ago. It was rescued about four years ago, after Mandela's grandson, Mandla Mandela, chief of Mvezo, had the original hut where Mandela was born torn down. In place of the humble, battered dwelling, he built a brand new replica, of no historic interest, critics say. The Nelson Mandela Center of Memory , where the remains of the original hut now reside, is designed to create a living reminder of the legacy of South Africa's first black president, but on Mandela's instruction is not supposed to be a museum.
NEWS
January 8, 1989 | JOHN JOHNSON, Times Staff Writer
When computer hacker Kevin Mitnick arrived at a Calabasas parking garage for a meeting with his friend Lenny DiCicco four weeks ago, DiCicco reached up and casually scratched his head, a prearranged signal to federal agents hiding nearby. Quickly, with the sound of screeching tires and shouted commands, a half dozen men closed in and handcuffed Mitnick. "Len, why did you do this to me?" Mitnick asked as he was being led away, DiCicco recalled later.
SCIENCE
June 19, 2005 | By Alan Zarembo, Times Staff Writer
The courier arrived just after midnight with a bag of blood collected from a fresh umbilical cord. Inside the laboratory at Family Cord Blood Services in Santa Monica, a worker siphoned off red cells, leaving a dilute mixture of stem cells — a personal supply for Olivia Michelle Boyd, born 15 hours earlier in Honolulu. Her parents, Stephanie and Anthony Boyd, had agreed to pay the company $1,265 to harvest the material and $115 a year to preserve it in a stainless steel tank filled with liquid nitrogen.
NEWS
October 27, 1991 | RONALD BROWNSTEIN, TIMES POLITICAL WRITER
Capping his first week in the presidential race, former California Gov. Edmund G. (Jerry) Brown Jr. blasted his Democratic rivals Saturday for running "hidden" campaigns focused on raising money from "a small, tiny fraction of the wealthiest people in the country."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 13, 1993 | THUAN LE and DAVID REYES, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
A 26-year-old woman was arrested Friday in connection with a dead baby who was found in a trash transfer station in Irvine last week, police said. Veronica Aguiler Gonzalez of Costa Mesa was accused of giving birth to a full-term girl and placing her in a dumpster in Newport Beach, where garbage was picked up and taken to Irvine, Newport Beach Police Sgt. Andy Gonis said. Workers found the corpse, with umbilical cord still attached, in a trash bag in the pre-dawn hours of Nov. 6.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 19, 2012 | By Hector Tobar, Los Angeles Times
The Distance Between Us A Memoir Reyna Grande Atria: 325 pp., $25 Reyna Grande's umbilical cord is buried under the ground of her grandmother's home in Iguala, Mexico. We learn this fact early in Grande's unforgettable new memoir, "The Distance Between Us. " Grande is a girl of about 6 when her big sister shows her the spot. Their mother, the woman once linked to Reyna by that cord, has set off for the U.S. to join their father, leaving three kids behind with their severe and cruel grandmother.
NEWS
April 29, 1985
A Los Angeles County Sheriff's deputy helped deliver a baby boy whose umbilical cord was wrapped around his neck. Deputy Mark Richardson, a 4-year veteran, answered a call to a Bellflower home. "Richardson arrived before the rescue units and found Myroc Tran, 31, several stages into labor," Deputy Rick Adams said. "Using knowledge gained from the Sheriff's Academy and departmental first aid training, Richardson began assisting. . . .
SPORTS
February 21, 2013 | By Lance Pugmire
Ronda Rousey is celebrated as a trailblazer, the first female champion in the male bastion of the Ultimate Fighting Championship. She got there by herself, with nothing more than the assistance of her mom and a few select others. When she enters the octagon Saturday night at Honda Center for UFC's first female fight - the main event against challenger Liz Carmouche - Rousey does so only after taking a series of boldly independent stances that wove together the fabric of this Santa Monica high school dropout.
NATIONAL
February 1, 2013 | By Michael Muskal
A four-inch-wide ventilation pipe has become the umbilical cord linking the outside world to a 5-year-old boy who has been held prisoner by a murder suspect in an underground bunker in rural Alabama since Tuesday. As the standoff enters its fourth day, the gunman, Jimmy Lee Dykes, 65, is holding firm against official entreaties to release the child, snatched off of a school bus and taken into the shelter. The boy, whose needed medication is sent into the bunker through the pipe, has been crying for his parents, according to Mayor Virgil Skipper of Midland City, Ala., about 90 miles from Montgomery.
OPINION
October 20, 2012
Re "Republicans for 'Sesame Street,'" Oct. 16 Jo Ellen Chatham's Op-Ed article is a compelling argument for maintaining federal funding for PBS. I would also like to hear her views on Mitt Romney's desire to eliminate federal funding for Planned Parenthood and to switch Medicaid to a block-grant program. Surely Chatham's compassionate stance on early childhood education for the disadvantaged is reflected in her feelings about healthcare for low-income women and others. Assuming she expresses similar compassion for these people, I would like to know why she is voting for Romney and encouraging others to do the same.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 19, 2012 | By Hector Tobar, Los Angeles Times
The Distance Between Us A Memoir Reyna Grande Atria: 325 pp., $25 Reyna Grande's umbilical cord is buried under the ground of her grandmother's home in Iguala, Mexico. We learn this fact early in Grande's unforgettable new memoir, "The Distance Between Us. " Grande is a girl of about 6 when her big sister shows her the spot. Their mother, the woman once linked to Reyna by that cord, has set off for the U.S. to join their father, leaving three kids behind with their severe and cruel grandmother.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 28, 2011 | By Mark Swed, Los Angeles Times Music Critic
Popular music and classical music may be distinct genres with their own traditions and social mores, but cross-pollination has long been the way of most musics. If nature abhors a void, she adores a hybrid. Jazz, for instance, developed when 19th century African Americans filtered the waltz and other aspects of Western music through African musical traditions, producing a new language to express their situation in America. Take a peek at 21st century Brooklyn, which John Adams called the new Montmartre at a Green Umbrella concert last season.
NEWS
July 11, 2011 | By Melissa Healy/For the Booster Shots blog
Autism seems to have a powerful genetic component, but a family history of the disorder isn't the whole story. The circumstances of a baby's birth may also predispose a child to developing autism, says a new study. Babies who come into the world after a difficult delivery, who have to be coaxed or sometimes pulled out of the birth canal, who have gotten tangled in the umbilical cord or whose first days are characterized by feeding problems, anemia or jaundice, these children face higher odds of developing autism than those whose births were more uneventful, says the study , published Monday in Pediatrics.
NEWS
July 14, 1989 | From Associated Press
An addict who gave birth to two children with traces of cocaine in their systems was convicted of drug delivery Thursday under a law routinely used against drug dealers. "A derivative of cocaine which the defendant had introduced into her body passed into theirs" through the umbilical cord, Circuit Judge O. H. Eaton Jr. ruled in the non-jury trial.
NEWS
October 11, 2010
Public or private? When it comes to banking of umbilical cord blood, the choice is far from clear. The debate revolves around whether parents should "privately" save their child's cord blood or donate it to a public cord blood bank. Blood recovered from a baby's umbilical cord may be saved to use for a future stem cell transplant. Many organizations, including the American Academy of Pediatrics , think it "unwise" for parents to go the private route. The National Cord Blood Program estimates that fees to bank blood privately run about $1,500 up front and then $100 per month.
SCIENCE
February 21, 2009 | Shari Roan
Walking, smiling and fidgeting, 3-year-old Dallas Hextell has become a poster child for the promise of stem cell therapy, a cutting-edge treatment approach that may one day heal diseases such as diabetes, brain injury and Parkinson's. But he has also become a symbol, researchers say, of the worst side of experimental medicine: jumping to conclusions.
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