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Umbilical Cords

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NEWS
January 16, 1999 | From Associated Press
An umbilical cord blood bank was established Friday at Children's Hospital for families nationwide who want to save the blood-rich cords for siblings with fatal blood diseases. The hospital, which also will begin cord blood transplants later this year, joins three other medical centers funded by the National Institutes of Health to collect umbilical cords for bone marrow transplants.
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ENTERTAINMENT
August 28, 2011 | By Mark Swed, Los Angeles Times Music Critic
Popular music and classical music may be distinct genres with their own traditions and social mores, but cross-pollination has long been the way of most musics. If nature abhors a void, she adores a hybrid. Jazz, for instance, developed when 19th century African Americans filtered the waltz and other aspects of Western music through African musical traditions, producing a new language to express their situation in America. Take a peek at 21st century Brooklyn, which John Adams called the new Montmartre at a Green Umbrella concert last season.
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NEWS
March 23, 1996 | DAVID HALDANE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Michelle Carew, the 18-year-old daughter of baseball great Rod Carew, was recovering Friday after doctors performed a rare type of blood transfusion to battle the leukemia that threatens her life. The young woman underwent the 45-minute procedure at Childrens Hospital of Orange County surrounded by family members, who to no avail had waged a public campaign to find a suitable bone marrow donor.
NEWS
October 11, 2010
Public or private? When it comes to banking of umbilical cord blood, the choice is far from clear. The debate revolves around whether parents should "privately" save their child's cord blood or donate it to a public cord blood bank. Blood recovered from a baby's umbilical cord may be saved to use for a future stem cell transplant. Many organizations, including the American Academy of Pediatrics , think it "unwise" for parents to go the private route. The National Cord Blood Program estimates that fees to bank blood privately run about $1,500 up front and then $100 per month.
NATIONAL
November 26, 2004 | From Associated Press
Umbilical-cord blood, now used mostly to treat children with leukemia, could save thousands of adults a year who cannot find bone marrow donors, two research studies indicate. A European study found that patients who received cord blood were as likely to be free of leukemia two years later as those who received bone marrow. A U.S. study looking at three-year survival yielded results almost as promising. The studies were published in Thursday's New England Journal of Medicine. To Dr. Mary M.
NEWS
July 18, 1996 | TERENCE MONMANEY, TIMES MEDICAL WRITER
Providing the strongest argument yet for widespread storage of frozen blood from umbilical cords and placentas, a study of terminally ill people, most of them children, has found that about half were saved by treatment involving a transfusion of so-called cord blood, even though it did not come from a family member.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 19, 2001 | THOMAS H. MAUGH II, TIMES MEDICAL WRITER
Theresa and Scott LaRue thought they had four healthy boys until their son Layne contracted Epstein-Barr virus in 1994 and died within two weeks. Trying to understand why Layne suffered such a drastic outcome from a viral infection that is normally much milder, physicians quickly discovered that two other sons--Garrett, then 3 1/2, and Blayke, 6 months--both have severely impaired immune systems. "It came out of nowhere for us," said Theresa LaRue.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 19, 1996 | MARTIN MILLER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Beating out scores of hospitals nationwide, Children's Hospital of Orange County and St. Joseph Hospital won a $5.5-million contract Wednesday to establish a national medical center to practice a promising new alternative to bone marrow transplants. The two hospitals will explore the lifesaving potential for umbilical cord blood transplants with the grant from the National Institutes of Health.
NEWS
November 20, 1987
Up to one in 50 pregnant women in America's inner cities may be infected with the AIDS virus, a rate as high as that in parts of Africa, where the disease is much more widespread, a study said. Researchers led by Dr. Sheldon Landesman of State University of New York Health Science Center in Brooklyn found that 2% of 602 women delivering babies at an inner-city hospital in New York had antibodies to the AIDS virus in the blood of their umbilical cords.
NEWS
June 14, 2001 | From Associated Press
Blood from umbilical cords can build new immune systems for adults with leukemia, offering a potentially lifesaving treatment for the many patients who cannot find suitable bone marrow donors. An estimated 4,000 to 6,000 Americans die each year while awaiting a bone marrow match. Until now, stem cells drawn from umbilical cord blood have been reserved mostly for treating children.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 20, 2010 | By Charlotte Stoudt
Les Thomas' "Cave Quest" is high concept -- i.e., Himalayan. The light but appealing new comedy, presented by East West Players at the Union Center for the Arts, is "The Odd Couple" at 14,000 feet. Video game designer Justin (West Liang) has dragged himself around the world in search of legendary Buddhist nun Padma (Kim Miyori), rumored to be in deep seclusion. He crashes her meditation pad, a rocky Nepalese cave inside the world's highest peaks. Justin's goals, however, are more entrepreneurial than mind-expanding: He wants to design a game that will bring players inner peace, for a mere $49.99.
SCIENCE
February 21, 2009 | Shari Roan
Walking, smiling and fidgeting, 3-year-old Dallas Hextell has become a poster child for the promise of stem cell therapy, a cutting-edge treatment approach that may one day heal diseases such as diabetes, brain injury and Parkinson's. But he has also become a symbol, researchers say, of the worst side of experimental medicine: jumping to conclusions.
NATIONAL
December 17, 2005 | From Associated Press
Congress on Friday agreed to establish a national databank of umbilical cord blood and bone marrow that would allow doctors to quickly find a match for patients who need transplants. The Senate passed the bill by voice vote. The House passed the bill in May by a vote of 431 to 1. The bill will provide $79 million in federal funding to increase the number of cord blood units available for matches. The objective is 150,000 units, which would mean 90% of patients needing them would have a match.
SCIENCE
June 19, 2005 | By Alan Zarembo, Times Staff Writer
The courier arrived just after midnight with a bag of blood collected from a fresh umbilical cord. Inside the laboratory at Family Cord Blood Services in Santa Monica, a worker siphoned off red cells, leaving a dilute mixture of stem cells — a personal supply for Olivia Michelle Boyd, born 15 hours earlier in Honolulu. Her parents, Stephanie and Anthony Boyd, had agreed to pay the company $1,265 to harvest the material and $115 a year to preserve it in a stainless steel tank filled with liquid nitrogen.
SCIENCE
May 21, 2005 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Transplanting umbilical cord blood to seemingly healthy infants before they develop symptoms of Krabbe's disease can dramatically prolong their lives, researchers reported this week in the New England Journal of Medicine. About one in 100,000 newborns has Krabbe's disease, an inherited condition that destroys the insulation surrounding nerve cells and typically kills a child by age 2.
NATIONAL
November 26, 2004 | From Associated Press
Umbilical-cord blood, now used mostly to treat children with leukemia, could save thousands of adults a year who cannot find bone marrow donors, two research studies indicate. A European study found that patients who received cord blood were as likely to be free of leukemia two years later as those who received bone marrow. A U.S. study looking at three-year survival yielded results almost as promising. The studies were published in Thursday's New England Journal of Medicine. To Dr. Mary M.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 26, 1997 | FRED ALVAREZ, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Bumping along on a Big Wheel tricycle, 4-year-old Garrett LaRue roared out of UCLA Medical Center on Tuesday and pedaled for home, his fragile body cleansed of a rare genetic disorder that probably would have killed him before his 10th birthday. The Oxnard boy, whose immune system has been wiped out by chemotherapy in the past two months and reborn with a cutting-edge blood cell transplant, was clearly ready to be rid of the hospital.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 20, 2010 | By Charlotte Stoudt
Les Thomas' "Cave Quest" is high concept -- i.e., Himalayan. The light but appealing new comedy, presented by East West Players at the Union Center for the Arts, is "The Odd Couple" at 14,000 feet. Video game designer Justin (West Liang) has dragged himself around the world in search of legendary Buddhist nun Padma (Kim Miyori), rumored to be in deep seclusion. He crashes her meditation pad, a rocky Nepalese cave inside the world's highest peaks. Justin's goals, however, are more entrepreneurial than mind-expanding: He wants to design a game that will bring players inner peace, for a mere $49.99.
NATIONAL
February 6, 2004 | Elizabeth Shogren, Times Staff Writer
The Environmental Protection Agency believes that about 630,000 of the roughly 4 million babies born annually in the United States -- twice as many as previously thought -- may be exposed to dangerous levels of mercury in the womb, according to an analysis released Thursday. The primary source of newborns' exposure to mercury is the fish and shellfish their mothers eat.
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