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Umbilical Cords

HEALTH
May 14, 2001 | DENISE HAMILTON, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
When Melissa Segal of Studio City became pregnant with her first child, she got lots of advice. But she says one of the most useful tips came from a girlfriend who suggested she bank her newborn's umbilical cord blood. Cord blood is high in stem cells, which are capable of developing into red blood cells, white blood cells and platelets.
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ENTERTAINMENT
August 28, 2011 | By Mark Swed, Los Angeles Times Music Critic
Popular music and classical music may be distinct genres with their own traditions and social mores, but cross-pollination has long been the way of most musics. If nature abhors a void, she adores a hybrid. Jazz, for instance, developed when 19th century African Americans filtered the waltz and other aspects of Western music through African musical traditions, producing a new language to express their situation in America. Take a peek at 21st century Brooklyn, which John Adams called the new Montmartre at a Green Umbrella concert last season.
SCIENCE
February 21, 2009 | Shari Roan
Walking, smiling and fidgeting, 3-year-old Dallas Hextell has become a poster child for the promise of stem cell therapy, a cutting-edge treatment approach that may one day heal diseases such as diabetes, brain injury and Parkinson's. But he has also become a symbol, researchers say, of the worst side of experimental medicine: jumping to conclusions.
BUSINESS
January 2, 1994
OB Tech Inc., which is developing a unique disposable system called Cordguard for sampling blood from umbilical cords, has been sold to a Utah medical device manufacturer for $2.5 million. The Huntington Beach company's deal with Utah Medical Products, announced in August, was completed after Utah Medical studied the effectiveness and profit potential of Cordguard. The device allows doctors to stop the flow of blood from newly cut umbilical cords and take sterile samples for laboratory analysis.
NEWS
November 27, 1998 | From Times Wire Reports
Blood taken from newborns' umbilical cords appears to offer a good source of lifesaving tissue for cancer victims and others who likely would die without bone marrow transplants and do not have related donors. The largest study yet of transplants using cord blood for patients who have no related donors shows a lessened risk of potentially fatal reactions that can result when people get marrow from donors whose tissue types are not closely matched.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 17, 1998
Four newborn sea lions, said to be residual victims of El Nino, are under 24-hour care at San Pedro's Marine Mammal Care Center, officials said. "Luckily, they have each other," said Jackie Ott, center director. "They're mother-dependent for up to a year, so we'll be tied up for a while here." The pups were abandoned on local beaches and brought to the nonprofit treatment facility by animal control agencies two weeks ago, when they were just two days old.
NEWS
August 26, 1989 | From Associated Press
A judge on Friday imposed 15 years of probation on a cocaine-addicted mother convicted of delivering drugs to two of her children through their umbilical cords at birth.
WORLD
June 19, 2011 | By John M. Glionna, Los Angeles Times
The drop box is attached to the side of a home in a ragged working-class neighborhood. It is lined with a soft pink and blue blanket, and has a bell that rings when the little door is opened. Because this depository isn't for books, it's for babies — and not just any infants; these children are the unwanted ones, a burden many parents find too terrible to bear. One is deaf, blind and paralyzed; another has a tiny misshapen head. There's a baby with Down syndrome, another with cerebral palsy, still another who is quadriplegic, with permanent brain damage.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 17, 2014 | By A Times Staff Writer
Two newborn kittens were accidentally shipped from Los Angeles to San Diego in small black boxes this week. The kittens were discovered with their umbilical cords still attached by Cox cable company employees in Chula Vista as part of a shipment of fiberglass equipment, according to 10 News in San Diego.  "They were very, very lucky that they didn't fall out of it in transport or when we were unloading the truck," Cox employee JC Collins told the station. The Humane Society's local chapter was called to care for the kittens.
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