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Umbrellas Art Project

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 26, 1991 | DAVID COLKER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In Christoland, the countdown had reached Day 138. That many days remained before the flowering at Gorman of the latest gigantic environmental sculpture by the artist Christo. Toiling on it on a sunny Thursday not long ago were workers in offices, factories, classrooms, rice fields and on mountainsides. They were in Tokyo, Toronto, San Diego, Ft. Worth, Bakersfield, the German city of Bayreuth, the little Japanese town of Hitachi-ota and on the Grapevine along Interstate 5.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 4, 1992 | DAVID COLKER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Environmental artist Christo reached a settlement Thursday with the family of a Camarillo woman killed by one of the giant umbrellas he erected in the Tejon Pass last year. The parties to the settlement declined to disclose dollar amounts or other details, but Christo's Chicago-based lawyer, Scott Hodes, said: "It has been settled to the satisfaction of everyone involved. "This ends the possibility of all possible future litigation on this matter," he added.
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NEWS
October 28, 1991 | AMY PYLE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Crews struggled in high winds Sunday to close Christo's giant umbrellas after the artist ordered his bi-continental project to end four days early because of the death of an admirer who was crushed by an uprooted umbrella. About 7,000 disappointed gawkers were met by rows of furled umbrellas, billowing like golden ghosts that disappeared into the fog shrouding the mountaintops. Hundreds of other umbrellas had been tattered or toppled by wind gusts before workers could crank them shut.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 20, 1992
Christo's giant yellow umbrellas pumped millions of dollars into the economies of Los Angeles and Kern counties, according to a rough analysis for a state agency. The 17-day exhibit by the artist brought $19.1 million--a figure based primarily on Christo's financial records--to the two counties, creating a "ripple effect" with an impact of $34.3 million on their economies, said a study obtained by The Times Tuesday from the California Arts Council.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 22, 1991 | DAVID COLKER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Mary Lynn Rasmussen has not spent much time searching for the meaning of the vast Christo umbrellas art project that opens next month near her Okie Girl restaurant and brewery 50 miles north of Los Angeles. "I'm just a little ol' Okie girl" who isn't very involved in the arts, she says. But that does not mean Rasmussen is not passionate about the gigantic Christo project that will see yellow umbrellas flower in the mountains and fields of the Tejon Pass off the Golden State Freeway.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 1, 1991 | AMY PYLE and DAVID COLKER, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
A crane operator was electrocuted in Japan Thursday while dismantling a portion of Christo's giant umbrellas project there, the second death in less than a week linked to the bi-continental exhibit. Masaaki Nakamura, 51, was killed after the boom from his crane was jolted by a 66,000-volt power line as he prepared to remove one of the 1,340 blue umbrellas from the Ibaraki Prefecture north of Tokyo, Christo officials said.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 8, 1992
The family of a Camarillo woman killed last year by a Christo umbrella uprooted in high winds near Lebec has filed a claim accusing Kern County officials of failing to predict the potential dangers of the huge environmental art display. Lori Keevil Mathews, 34, died Oct. 26 when gusty winds ripped one of the 488-pound yellow umbrellas from its moorings near a Kern County road and sent it tumbling down a hill into a crowd of spectators.
NEWS
October 10, 1991 | DAVID COLKER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
More than 1,700 giant yellow umbrellas fluttered open Wednesday on the barren, tan slopes of the Tejon Pass north of Los Angeles, completing one of the largest undertakings in modern art history--the creation of twin forests of colorful canopies in California and Japan by environmental artist Christo. The strange sight produced jubilation, wisecracks, bafflement and tears of joy.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 6, 1991 | DAVID COLKER, David Colker is a Times staff writer. and
Christo is back in California and this time he is not the enemy. Fifteen years ago, the Bulgarian-born artist was in Northern California to erect one of his trademark, site-specific alterations of landscape: a 24 1/2-mile fence of white nylon that stretched across fields of Sonoma and Marin counties and continued into the Pacific Ocean. During his four years on that project he was mocked, jeered and repeatedly taken to court.
NEWS
October 28, 1991 | TINA DAUNT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Lori Keevil-Mathews knew a rare disease would someday take her life and vowed to enjoy the time she had left. So on a whim Saturday, she and her husband jumped into their car and rushed to see Christo's huge yellow umbrellas at Tejon Pass. A few hours later, the 34-year-old Camarillo insurance agent was dead--killed when a 488-pound umbrella tore loose from its foundation in a driving wind and crushed her against a boulder.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 20, 1992 | DAVID COLKER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Whether Christo's giant yellow umbrellas were art or hype may be an endless argument, but according to a rough analysis for a state agency, they pumped millions of dollars into the economies of Los Angeles and Kern counties. The 17-day exhibit by the environmental artist brought $19.1 million--a figure based primarily on Christo's financial records--to the two counties, creating a "ripple effect" with an impact of $34.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 8, 1992
The family of a Camarillo woman killed last year by a Christo umbrella uprooted in high winds near Lebec has filed a claim accusing Kern County officials of failing to predict the potential dangers of the huge environmental art display. Lori Keevil Mathews, 34, died Oct. 26 when gusty winds ripped one of the 488-pound yellow umbrellas from its moorings near a Kern County road and sent it tumbling down a hill into a crowd of spectators.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 7, 1992 | AARON CURTISS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The family of a Camarillo woman killed last year by a Christo umbrella uprooted in high winds near Lebec has filed a claim accusing Kern County officials of failing to predict the potential dangers of the huge environmental art display. Lori Keevil Mathews, 34, died Oct. 26 when gusty winds ripped one of the 488-pound yellow umbrellas from its moorings near a Kern County road and sent it tumbling down a hillside into a crowd of spectators.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 28, 1991
OPENED: Environmental artist Christo opened 1,760 giant yellow umbrellas on the tan slopes of the Tejon Pass in one of the largest undertakings in modern art history. More than 1 million spectators drove past and flew over the whimsical display, twinned with a project in Japan. Tragedy beset the display when a violent windstorm uprooted one of the 488-pound umbrellas and crushed an admirer, prompting an early dismantling.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 15, 1991
The Kern County coroner's office concluded Thursday that a Camarillo woman was killed because she was hit by one of the 488-pound umbrellas, erected in the Tejon Pass by artist Christo, when it was blown loose in a windstorm. Christo's attorney has maintained since the Oct. 26 death that there was no evidence the victim, Lori Rae Keevil-Mathews, 33, had actually been hit by the uprooted umbrella, speculating that she could have fallen at the same time the umbrella broke loose.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 10, 1991 | DAVID COLKER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
George Mull wanted desperately for Christo's umbrellas to change his life. He got his wish, but not in the way he had expected. Like many who lived in the Tejon Pass where the Bulgarian-born artist's massive "The Umbrellas" project stood from Oct. 9 to Oct. 26, Mull saw the art exhibition as a once-in-a-lifetime opportunity. How often, after all, would this area of truck stops and sleepy villages be a center of international attention?
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 15, 1991 | JIM HERRON ZAMORA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Advocates for cows, dogs, students, artists and the homeless are trying--so far in vain--to get their hands on some of the 1,760 umbrellas along Interstate 5 in the Tejon Pass. All say that the 20-foot-tall umbrellas erected as part of an international art project by environmental artist Christo are just what they need as protection from the sun or rain.
NEWS
October 13, 1991
Girl Scouts throughout Central and Southern California can earn a new "Under the Umbrellas" patch this month through a project offered by the Joshua Tree Council. Scouts can learn about temporary works of art by studying the newest project of the artist Christo, which includes more than 19 miles of yellow umbrellas around the Tejon Ranch and Lebec areas in Kern and Los Angeles counties.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 1, 1991 | AMY PYLE and DAVID COLKER, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
A crane operator was electrocuted in Japan Thursday while dismantling a portion of Christo's giant umbrellas project there, the second death in less than a week linked to the bi-continental exhibit. Masaaki Nakamura, 51, was killed after the boom from his crane was jolted by a 66,000-volt power line as he prepared to remove one of the 1,340 blue umbrellas from the Ibaraki Prefecture north of Tokyo, Christo officials said.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 30, 1991 | DAVID COLKER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A lawyer for environmental artist Christo said Tuesday he has been shown no proof that a woman killed near one of the artist's giant umbrellas in Tejon pass was actually struck by the umbrella, which official reports blame for the death. "There is no one who has told us that it hit her," said Scott Hodes, a Chicago-based lawyer. "There are some people who are not certain that the umbrella hit her at all," he said, referring to witnesses he said he had interviewed.
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