Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsUmpires Labor Relations
IN THE NEWS

Umpires Labor Relations

FEATURED ARTICLES
SPORTS
July 20, 1999 | ROSS NEWHAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Support among major league umpires for the attempt to force management to the bargaining table by submitting their resignations, effective Sept. 2, may have begun to disintegrate Monday. A baseball official said that between 10% and 20% of those who submitted resignations notified their league offices that they want to rescind the resignation or are considering it. "In light of the reaction, I think these guys feel they made a big mistake predicated on faulty legal advice," the official said.
ARTICLES BY DATE
SPORTS
July 17, 2001 | Ross Newhan
Major league officials said Monday that they expected to meet soon with representatives of the umpires' union in hopes of resolving a suddenly smoldering dispute arising from baseball's strike zone. Sandy Alderson, baseball's executive vice president of operations, has recently notified some umpires that they need to call more strikes, thus reducing the number of pitches and game times.
Advertisement
SPORTS
July 18, 1999 | BILL PLASCHKE
I bravely crept into the umpire's dressing room at Edison Field the other day, searching for sloppy fat guys. "I'm not sure we can help you," slim Joe Brinkman said with a smile. "But I used to be 30 pounds heavier until this new diet. Does that count?" I boldly walked into the heart of the evil empire looking for someone to taunt me into bumping them. "You know, I really love this game," Dale Scott said. "Since I was in Little League, I've loved this game. I've always wanted to be a part of it."
SPORTS
May 12, 2001 | ROSS NEWHAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In a long-awaited decision satisfying no one, an arbitrator ruled Friday that baseball must reinstate nine of the 22 umpires whose resignations as part of a failed labor strategy had been accepted two years ago. The nine, who will also receive back pay if baseball abides by the decision, include Drew Coble, Gary Darling, Bill Hohn, Greg Kosc, Larry Poncino, Larry Vanover and Joe West.
SPORTS
July 22, 1999 | ROSS NEWHAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Potentially divisive internal problems continued to hobble the umpires union Wednesday in its simmering labor dispute with major league baseball. Sources said that veteran National League umpire Wally Bell had rescinded his resignation and that NL rookie Jeff Nelson was prepared to do the same. Between 15 to 20 of the 66 union members have now either rescinded their resignations or not submitted one in opposition to a strategy devised by counsel Richie Phillips, sources said.
SPORTS
July 16, 1999 | DIANE PUCIN
Our two last-place major league baseball teams, the Angels and the Dodgers, played each other Thursday night at Edison Field. And guess what? The Angels and the Dodgers weren't the biggest losers on the field. The biggest losers would be the umpiring crew of Joe Brinkman, Doug Eddings, Dale Scott and Larry Cousins. Even though these Orange County fans hardly ever get worked up over anything sports-related, the umpires got booed when they walked onto the field. So good for you, fans.
SPORTS
July 17, 2001 | Ross Newhan
Major league officials said Monday that they expected to meet soon with representatives of the umpires' union in hopes of resolving a suddenly smoldering dispute arising from baseball's strike zone. Sandy Alderson, baseball's executive vice president of operations, has recently notified some umpires that they need to call more strikes, thus reducing the number of pitches and game times.
SPORTS
June 21, 2000 | ROSS NEWHAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
As part of collective bargaining negotiations with the new umpires union, baseball has offered to rehire some of the 22 umpires who were let go last September. Management, however, is finding those negotiations no less contentious with the new union than it often did with the Richie Phillips-led old union, leaving the fate of the 22 among four key issues that remain unresolved after two dozen negotiating sessions over the last three months.
SPORTS
April 29, 1995 | From Staff and Wire Reports
Replacement umpires will be barred from working at the SkyDome after the Toronto Blue Jays' first homestand, the Ontario Labor Relations Board said Friday. The regular umpires have been locked out since their four-year contract expired Dec. 31. Rick MacDowell, chairman of a three-man panel that included Bromley Armstrong and R.W. Pirrie, said in a 13-page decision that Ontario's law against replacement workers applied in this case.
SPORTS
April 25, 1995 | From Associated Press
Major league umpires rejected the latest offer from owners, making it likely replacements will be working when the season opens today. The board of the umpires' union rejected the offer, 9-0. Amateur umpires have been working during spring training and owners are prepared to start the season with them. "It's with regret that we can't make a deal," management negotiator Robert Kheel said.
SPORTS
June 21, 2000 | ROSS NEWHAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
As part of collective bargaining negotiations with the new umpires union, baseball has offered to rehire some of the 22 umpires who were let go last September. Management, however, is finding those negotiations no less contentious with the new union than it often did with the Richie Phillips-led old union, leaving the fate of the 22 among four key issues that remain unresolved after two dozen negotiating sessions over the last three months.
SPORTS
September 3, 1999 | ROSS NEWHAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
With the resignations of 22 major league umpires having become effective Thursday, their union faced the possibility that one failed labor strategy could lead to another. In exchange for management agreeing to keep the 22 on salary through the final month of the season and submit the dispute to arbitration, the union agreed to withdraw a federal lawsuit and its allegation to the National Labor Relations Board of unfair labor practice by management.
SPORTS
August 10, 1999 | From Associated Press
Baseball umpires might still strike this season, but their union head has told them to wait until the National Labor Relations Board rules on their unfair labor practice complaint. "At about the same time that we withdrew the resignations, baseball engaged in a series of very, very serious unfair labor practices that could create a strike," union head Richie Phillips said Monday.
SPORTS
August 3, 1999 | ROSS NEWHAN
Make no mistake, major league umpires are where they are because of union counsel Richie Phillips. His ill-conceived strategy has split the union along a bitter fault line, pitting partner against partner, wife against wife, while leading to the dismissal of 22 umpires, effective Sept. 2, the date their resignations were to have been implemented.
SPORTS
August 3, 1999 | STUART SILVERSTEIN and JEFF LEEDS, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Labor law experts say that the recent mass resignation by umpires against major league baseball was, as union legal strategies go, a classic case of a blown call. The final score: The 22 replaced umpires who are hoping to get their jobs back appear to have scant hope of winning reinstatement through the courts. "Umpires usually throw other people out of the game. This time they threw themselves out of the game," said Roger I.
SPORTS
July 28, 1999 | GARY KLEIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Baseball umpires rarely reverse their calls on the field, but major league umpires did just that on the labor front Tuesday when they withdrew their resignations. Fifty-six of the 68 major league umpires, attempting to get management to the bargaining table and fearing owners would lock them out when their labor contract expires Dec. 31, had voted July 14 to resign effective Sept. 2. But the move began to backfire when some of the umpires attempted to take back their resignations.
SPORTS
March 30, 1990 | Associated Press
Major league umpires say they will return to work Sunday under a new agreement that reimburses them for games canceled during the 32-day lockout and gives them three more vacation days during the regular season. Lawyers for the umpires' union and the leagues reached the out-of-court settlement Thursday, after U.S. District Judge Norma L. Shapiro reopened a hearing on baseball's request for an order forcing the umpires back to work.
SPORTS
February 14, 1991 | From Staff and Wire Reports
Richie Phillips, executive director of the Major League Umpires Assn., said he fears there will be a spring-training lockout of umpires by major league owners despite contract negotiations that he described as on schedule. "Some owners feel they need to get a win," Phillips said. "They want to send a message to the umpires that just because we gave (big-money contracts) to the players, don't think we'll give it to you."
SPORTS
July 23, 1999 | JERRY CROWE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Taking a proactive stance in the simmering labor dispute with its bickering umpires, major league baseball hired 10 minor league umps Thursday to take their place in September. Commissioner Bud Selig and his top officials hired the triple-A replacements, who had been working as vacation fill-ins, in their first response to the major league umpires' attempts to force management to the bargaining table by submitting their resignations.
SPORTS
July 22, 1999 | ROSS NEWHAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Potentially divisive internal problems continued to hobble the umpires union Wednesday in its simmering labor dispute with major league baseball. Sources said that veteran National League umpire Wally Bell had rescinded his resignation and that NL rookie Jeff Nelson was prepared to do the same. Between 15 to 20 of the 66 union members have now either rescinded their resignations or not submitted one in opposition to a strategy devised by counsel Richie Phillips, sources said.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|