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BUSINESS
February 7, 2001 | Bloomberg News
Worldwide Medical Corp. of Irvine was cited by the Food and Drug Administration for allegedly selling tests that check for drug use without agency approval. The FDA is seeking a total of $3.29 million in fines from Worldwide Medical and its current and former executives, according to an administrative complaint filed by the agency. The tests are sold over the counter for $12.99 to $29.99 and screen urine for marijuana, cocaine and heroin, Worldwide Chief Executive Daniel McGuire said.
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BUSINESS
February 29, 2000 | From Associated Press
A Canadian Internet site agreed Monday not to rebroadcast American TV programming to audiences in the United States without permission, settling a lawsuit filed by movie studios, TV networks, the NFL and the NBA. Toronto-based ICraveTV.com was sued in federal court in Pittsburgh last month for putting on its free Web site programs it intercepted from TV stations in New York and Canada.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 2, 1999
Your May 26 editorial, "Out-of-Control Pharmaceuticals," briefly mentions perhaps the most disconcerting aspect of prescription drug smuggling--the role of American drug manufacturers. It should be no surprise to anyone that American companies sell in foreign countries unapproved drugs that can't be sold in the U.S. In this way they differ little from manufacturers that sell guns and cigarettes (and maybe flammable pajamas) abroad. Greed and shortsightedness leave Americans pretty much helpless in dealing with the tragic fallout of such practices.
BUSINESS
March 18, 1998 | From Bloomberg News
A federal agency disclosed Tuesday that it has cited two Orange County biomedical companies for unapproved activities--Gish Biomedical Inc. in Irvine and Imagyn Medical Technologies Inc. in Newport Beach. The U.S. Food and Drug Administration issued a warning letter to Gish for allegedly making changes to infusion pumps it sells without clearing the alterations first with the agency.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 19, 1997 | DAVAN MAHARAJ, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Federal prosecutors announced new charges Tuesday against two of the UC Irvine fertility clinic doctors at the center of an international scandal, accusing the clinic's former director for the first time of stealing human eggs from some patients and implanting them in other unsuspecting women. Ten of 40 new charges against Dr. Ricardo H. Asch, the scandal's central figure, accused him of misappropriating the eggs of some former patients at UCI's now-defunct Center for Reproductive Health.
NEWS
July 27, 1996 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Federal regulators in Gaithersburg, Md., issued an unusually strong warning to stop eye doctors from using unapproved laser surgery machines to correct nearsightedness. The warning is the latest in a blitz of controversy over a popular laser surgery that promises better vision without glasses to many of the 60 million Americans who are nearsighted. The FDA has approved two lasers since last fall, made by Summit Technology and Visx, to help people see more clearly at a distance.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 27, 1996 | JULIE MARQUIS and MARTIN MILLER, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
UC Irvine officials announced Friday that an apparently unapproved egg transfer occurred four years ago at a clinic operated by university doctors at Saddleback Memorial Medical Center, bringing a fourth Southern California hospital into the university's human egg-swapping scandal.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 22, 1995 | LESLEY WRIGHT
Twenty residents of a cul-de-sac off Western Avenue managed to change a local permit law by simply ignoring it. City Council members grudgingly agreed this week to give preliminary approval to an agreement between the city and the 20 homeowners to revise a use permit rather than force some residents to tear down room additions. "This does give one part of the city special rights and privileges, but if their neighbors aren't complaining, they will get it," Councilman Arthur C. Brown said.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 11, 1995
The UCI fertility clinic may well be accused of a lot of things, but I do not believe that solely using a drug not yet approved by the FDA should be considered a wrongdoing. Like all other fields in medicine, a physician is often forced to make a decision for the patient's benefits. If the patient's decision is arrived at after having been fully informed of an unapproved drug's risks and benefits, should a FDA stamp be the sole stumbling block on her path to bearing a child? There are many reasons other than efficacy and safety that get a drug held up at the FDA. However, there is little for the FDA bureaucracy to gain in hastening a drug's approval and much to lose should a drug turn out to be causing serious side effects.
BUSINESS
June 21, 1994 | DAVID R. OLMOS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Federal investigators have issued subpoenas to more than 100 hospitals as part of a nationwide probe into possible Medicare and Medicaid fraud involving the use of unapproved medical devices. Hospital officials and health care lawyers said Monday that the inspector general of the Department of Health and Human Services has issued the subpoenas to hospitals and some medical equipment manufacturers during the last several weeks.
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