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Uncertainty

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NATIONAL
March 26, 2014 | By Molly Hennessy-Fiske
OSO, Wash. -- Nikki Behner had to evacuate her home here after the devastating mudslide that left 16 confirmed dead and dozens missing. She told a community meeting Wednesday night that she and her husband were staying with her animals in a friend's barn. “We're lucky. We have friends who are still in hotels, spending money they don't have,” she told a crowd of about 50 gathered in the 100-year-old white frame Oso Chapel. It's on Highway 530, a short drive from where the mudslide blocked the highway.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 16, 2014 | By Frank Shyong
After a months-long battle with the city of Irwindale over complaints about a spicy odor, Sriracha sauce creator David Tran said Wednesday that he is now seriously considering moving his factory to another location. Tran responded Wednesday to the politicians and business leaders from 10 states and multiple cities in California who have offered to host the Sriracha factory. He invited them to tour the facility in Irwindale and decide if their communities would complain about the odors that arise during production.
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OPINION
March 4, 1990
In stating "You cannot make life risk-free" (Part A, Feb. 23), President Bush recognized a basic truth that many others intent on reducing health-care costs have failed to recognize. Uncertainty is ubiquitous in medicine. However, our current health-care system does not recognize this point. The staggering cost of health care, the practice of defensive medicine, and the medical malpractice problem, all cited by President Bush, are manifestations of the failure to adequately control and manage uncertainty.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 13, 2014 | Chris Megerian and Melanie Mason and Hailey Branson-Potts
Two conflicting eyewitness accounts emerged Saturday as investigators delved deeper into the cause of the horrific collision between a truck and a charter bus that killed 10 and cast a pall over a college-acceptance trip to Humboldt State University. A driver who was sideswiped moments before Thursday evening's fatal accident said she saw flames coming from beneath a FedEx freight truck as it veered across a grassy median toward disaster. A man who lives next to Interstate 5, however, said he saw no flames from the truck before the crash and watched the twin-trailer FedEx vehicle swerve out of control after it made an abortive attempt to move into the fast lane.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 6, 2000
With all the concerns about online shopping and the uncertainty of return policies over the holidays, perhaps it would better be termed "eek-commerce." ADRIAN MENDOZA Modesto
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 16, 1991
I am one American who is sick and tired of paying for "politically correct" causes that serve to benefit the politicians rather than the taxpayers. The latest is the $10-billion housing loan guarantee that certain congressmen want to hand out to Israel immediately in spite of President Bush's plea to wait four months. Most of the so-called Jewish refugees from the Soviet Union are, admittedly, leaving decent jobs and decent housing only because of their "uncertainty about the future."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 5, 1986
Tirman's article outlining the weakness of arguments against a nuclear test ban was excellent. It is interesting to note that the Administration argues on the one hand that the uncertainty of an attack succeeding because of a lack of weapons testing would be destabilizing, yet on the other hand, the uncertainty of an attack succeeding because of a "Star Wars" defensive system in place would be stabilizing. With this type of doublethink going on, it's no wonder the Soviets and the rest of us can't figure out what the Administration has in mind.
SPORTS
May 10, 1997
The last time I coached a basketball team, I was a Navy neurosurgeon, approximately 30 years ago. Surely now, however, I could do a better job coaching the Lakers than Del Harris would do operating on brains or spines. The inconsistency of his substitution pattern puts the players (and fans) in a state of uncertainty. He has failed to school his extremely talented players. He certainly doesn't inspire them. MICHAEL H. SUKOFF Tustin
NEWS
August 17, 2012 | By Alana Semuels
GLEN ALLEN, Va. - Small businesses may not be thriving in this economy, but just why is up for debate. Republicans blame President Obama, while some say small-business owners are hesitant to hire or do much of anything else until they see who wins the White House in November. Rep. Paul D. Ryan focused the blame on the Obama administration Friday as he visited a Virginia town that is home to two fellow Republicans, Rep. Eric Cantor and Virginia Gov. Bob McDonnell. “We should not have a government that stands in the way, that erects barriers to small business,” Ryan said at a rally at Deep Run High School, just outside of Richmond.
OPINION
March 8, 2008
Re "How many non- believers?" Opinion, March 4 John Allen Paulos has done what most would consider impossible: He has separated mathematics from logic. To begin with, he conflates atheism with agnosticism, a cause du jour for atheists attempting to bolster their numbers. Later, Paulos conflates again the assumption that nonbelief in a conventional god is aligned with the cause of atheism. Disbelief and honest doubt are not signs of bravery; they are signs of disbelief and honest doubt.
NATIONAL
March 26, 2014 | By Molly Hennessy-Fiske
OSO, Wash. -- Nikki Behner had to evacuate her home here after the devastating mudslide that left 16 confirmed dead and dozens missing. She told a community meeting Wednesday night that she and her husband were staying with her animals in a friend's barn. “We're lucky. We have friends who are still in hotels, spending money they don't have,” she told a crowd of about 50 gathered in the 100-year-old white frame Oso Chapel. It's on Highway 530, a short drive from where the mudslide blocked the highway.
NATIONAL
March 24, 2014 | By Maria L. La Ganga and Matt Pearce
ARLINGTON, Wash. - Danger and uncertainty hang like a pall over the small towns along the Stillaguamish River. The mudslide that tore across State Route 530 - leaving nearly a square mile of debris and slicing a scar in the hillside taller than the Washington Monument - threatened to continue moving Monday. Search-and-rescue teams equipped with sonar, hovercraft and dogs were pulled back from the hardest-hit area for two hours out of fear that they too might become casualties of Saturday's deadly slide.
SPORTS
February 18, 2014 | By Chris Foster
Arizona's coronation may have been premature. Oregon's demise may have been exaggerated. And UCLA is . . . well, UCLA. People still aren't quite sure. The jury is also out on California and Arizona State, who lurk just off the pace in the standings. The Pac-12 Conference basketball regular season has three weeks left and a few things have changed since the start of league play in early January. Back then, Arizona was ranked No. 1 in the Associated Press media poll, Oregon was No. 10 and Colorado No. 20. Heading into this week's games, Arizona still sits at No. 4 - but has issues.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 12, 2014 | Julie Cart
Five years after the Obama administration's renewable energy initiative touched off a building boom of large-scale solar power plants across the desert Southwest, the pace of development has slowed to a crawl, with a number of companies going out of business and major projects canceled for lack of financing. Of the 365 federal solar applications since 2009, just 20 plants are on track to be built. Only three large-scale solar facilities have gone online, two in California and one in Nevada.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 19, 2013 | By David L. Ulin, Los Angeles Times Book Critic
Toward the end of September, I found myself in a meeting room at Brooklyn Borough Hall in New York with planners from a variety of book fairs (Miami, Trinidad, Texas, Australia) discussing audience and cooperation and outreach. It was the morning after the Brooklyn Book Festival, which had drawn tens of thousands, and the atmosphere was upbeat, marked by excitement, even relief. Economics remained an issue (how to attract and pay for writers, how to advertise and promote) but there was no lamenting, no sense that things might be shutting down.
SPORTS
November 11, 2013 | By Gary Klein
As recruiting coordinator and interim coach at USC, Ed Orgeron has identified his quarry. There is the wide receiver, regarded as perhaps the best in the nation. Tight ends, linemen, linebackers and several defensive backs also have been targeted. "They're the No. 1 recruits on our board," Orgeron said. Orgeron is not discussing high school or junior college prospects. He is talking about USC's draft-eligible juniors and third-year sophomores. Like all major programs, USC annually faces the possibility of players' leaving for professional football before they have exhausted their eligibility.
SPORTS
July 22, 2000
While I'm the first to hope that the sparkling reviews on the Angels' play of late is genuine and that their performance on the field is sustainable, history tells a different story. Many seasons in the past, the Angels have sunk soon after the all-star break, or even worse, much later into the season. Their record this season against the Mariners and the A's, their division rivals, is dismal. The performance of Troy Percival, the team's closer with eight blown saves, has created uncertainty about his role on the team, and their inability to win in tight games leaves in doubt their tenacity.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 8, 1998
Many thanks to Times staff writer James Ricci and photographer Joel P. Lugavere for the heartwarming four-part serial on the struggles of Todd Robinson and his family in the wake of his work-related burn accident (Dec. 28-31). Rarely do daily news stories give us the opportunity to understand and appreciate how tragic events affect people's lives forever. Ricci's artful prose and observations captured the poignancy of the changes in the lives of all the Robinson family members. The photographs, too, are awesome in conveying the attendant fear, exhaustion, uncertainty and fleeting moments of exhilaration.
BUSINESS
October 16, 2013 | By Don Lee
WASHINGTON -- If there was any doubt about whether uncertainty has a real cost to the country, the latest Federal Reserve summary of the economy should dispel that. Over and over again, the so-called beige book -- an anecdotal account of the economic conditions in each of the Fed's 12 districts -- talks about the drag caused by the heightened uncertainty over the government's budget and debt-ceiling crisis. The report, released Wednesday, describes the overall economy as growing at a "modest to moderate pace" during September and early October, similar to the previous period.
BUSINESS
October 10, 2013 | By Jim Puzzanghera
Appearing before lawmakers a week before the deadline to raise the debt limit, Treasury Secretary Jacob J. Lew on Thursday warned that the uncertainty caused by the fiscal stalemate was stressing financial markets and could "deeply damage" the economic recovery and "the jobs and savings of millions of Americans. " Lew also forcefully dismissed the idea being pushed by some Republicans that the Treasury could prioritize interest and principal payments to holders of government bonds to prevent a technical default if the $16.7-trillion debt limit isn't raised by Oct. 17. Although President Obama would prefer an increase that would put off another debt limit fight for a while, Lew said the White House was open to approving a short-term increase that would avoid a potential default for a month or so. QUIZ: Test your knowledge about the debt limit But Lew stressed that Congress must raise the debt limit by Oct. 17, when the Treasury will run out of borrowing authority and be dependent on cash on hand and incoming revenues to pay the federal government's bills.
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