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Uncertainty

NEWS
July 9, 1998 | DAVID R. OLMOS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Seeking to resolve a tortuous and costly legal battle, Dow Corning Corp. reached a tentative agreement with negotiators for women with silicone breast implants Wednesday to pay $3.2 billion to settle claims by more than 170,000 women that the implants harmed their health. The settlement would compensate women based on the seriousness of injury they claim, providing up to $300,000 for those who have a severely debilitating illness.
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TRAVEL
November 17, 2002 | Susan Spano, Times Staff Writer
PEOPLE sometimes take trips for deep reasons. They're turning 50 and feel compelled to see Florence; they've just recovered from an illness and want to trek in the Himalayas; they're divorcing and need to escape the anguish. Psychologically motivated trips like these are, in a sense, gambles with life. The transition or crisis makes people more willing to free themselves from routine, feel in a heightened way or make life changes based on events on the road. They are my favorite kinds of trips.
NEWS
July 26, 1990 | BOB DROGIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
For Hong Kong residents desperate to flee before China takes over in 1997, the Federal Republic of Corterra sounded perfect. The tiny Pacific island nation was described as lying between Tahiti and Hawaii, with 80,000 citizens who enjoy democratic government, a British-style legal system and no income tax. Best of all, a newspaper ad here boasted, passports are bargain-priced at only $16,000. Three local businessmen quickly paid the $5,000 application fee. Then they discovered the catch.
MAGAZINE
April 12, 1987 | DAVID DEVOSS, David DeVoss is a Los Angeles Times Magazine staff writer.
ACROSS THE PACIFIC OCEAN, a never-ending war of maneuver is under way. It is a three-dimensional struggle--under sea, on the water and in the air--that pits the U.S. Navy against a Soviet fleet three times its size. The prize is control over half the world's surface. The weapons are multimillion-dollar ships and planes, as well as a vast array of sophisticated electronics that could provide the winning advantage if a conflict between the superpowers ever erupts.
SPORTS
August 19, 2009 | Dylan hernandez
On a day when Manager Joe Torre conceded that Hiroki Kuroda probably would go on the disabled list in the near future, Clayton Kershaw walked into the Dodgers' clubhouse with flu-like symptoms. Nice timing, huh? Kershaw's illness translated into uncertainty for the Band-Aid of the ailing pitching staff, Jeff Weaver . Weaver was named as Kuroda's replacement to start the series opener against the Chicago Cubs on Thursday -- that is, if Kershaw is healthy enough to face the St. Louis Cardinals today.
NEWS
June 27, 2012 | By Alana Semuels
Uncertainty has been the buzz word in the struggling economy, as business leaders say they don't want to hire until a few national policy decisions are resolved -- President Obama's Affordable Care Act being one of them. So does that mean Thursday's expected Supreme Court ruling on the healthcare law could boost hiring, and possibly Obama's reelection chances, by removing that uncertainty? Economists are not certain. "The idea that having a clearer outlook on policy at all levels will produce certainty -- that's true," said Gregory Daco, an economist with IHS Global Insight.
WORLD
May 6, 2010 | By Henry Chu, Los Angeles Times
Britain looked set for a period of political uncertainty as voters appeared to usher in a stalemated Parliament, with the opposition Conservatives on track to capture the most seats in a volatile national election Thursday but not enough to form a majority government. Exit polls projected a harsh blow to the ruling Labor Party, whose dominance after 13 years of government has apparently come to an end. Voters denied the party of Prime Minister Gordon Brown an uncontestable and unprecedented fourth term, pushing it into second place.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 31, 2008 | Geoff Boucher; Chris Lee; Mark Olsen; Rachel Abramowitz; Scott Timberg; Patrick Day; Kenneth Turan
The 25 best L.A. films of the last 25 years "Los ANGELES isn't a real city," people have said, "it just plays one on camera." It was a clever line once upon a time, but all that has changed. Los Angeles is the most complicated community in America -- make no mistake, it is a community -- and over the last 25 years, it has been both celebrated and savaged on the big screen with amazing efficacy. Damaged souls and flawless weather, canyon love and beach city menace, homeboys and credit card girls, freeways and fedoras, power lines and palm trees . . . again and again, moviegoers all over the world have sat in the dark and stared up at our Los Angeles, even if it was one populated by corrupt cops or a jabbering cartoon rabbit.
BUSINESS
August 14, 1985 | Associated Press
The dollar was mixed against other major currencies amid continuing uncertainty about the direction of the U.S. economy Tuesday. Gold prices also were mixed. "There were no logical moves that had any impact," said Robert Ryan, senior trader at Irving Trust. "The key question is which way the economy is going." In Europe, traders pondered conflicting signals about the strength of the U.S. economy from Washington. The government announced that retail sales rose 0.4% in July.
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