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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 19, 2008 | Kate Linthicum
More than 200,000 ballots in L.A. County remained uncounted Tuesday, two weeks after election day. Officials still have to process roughly 175,000 provisional ballots and 19,000 mail-in ballots, said Marcia Ventura, a spokeswoman for the L.A. County registrar-recorder. Election officials have until Dec. 2 to count and report votes. The results will be certified by the secretary of state Dec. 13. -- Kate Linthicum
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
October 18, 2012 | By James Rainey
The journey toward election reform that began with the hotly contested presidential election of 2000 is “less than halfway complete,” according to a group of scientists, who on Thursday urged the shoring up of old problems and a go-slow approach on innovations like mail-in voting. The comprehensive report by the Caltech-MIT Voting Technology Project said millions of voters continued to lose access to the polls or have their votes uncounted because of technological and procedural shortfalls.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 10, 2010 | By Phil Willon, Los Angeles Times
A Superior Court judge on Friday ordered Riverside County to tally more than 12,500 mail-in ballots that arrived a day after the polls closed in the June 8 primary, a decision that could alter the outcome of a neck-and-neck legislative race. A 12-vote margin separates Mary Salas and Juan Vargas in the Democratic race for state Senate District 40, which includes Imperial County and slivers of Riverside and San Diego counties. "It's very close, so we're certainly optimistic," said Barry Klein, campaign manager for Salas, an assemblywoman from Chula Vista who narrowly trails Vargas.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 23, 2012 | By Phil Willon, Los Angeles Times
Proponents of a $1-per-pack tax on tobacco conceded defeat Friday after weeks of hoping that votes on late-arriving ballots could erase a June 5 electoral deficit. Proposition 29, aimed at raising $860 million for research on tobacco-related diseases and smoking-prevention programs, faced unrelenting opposition by tobacco giants Philip Morris USA and R.J. Reynolds Tobacco Co., which poured nearly $47 million into fighting the measure. The No on 29 campaign declined to declare victory Friday, deciding to wait for the official vote to be announced by the California secretary of state's office in early July.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 14, 1993
Regarding your editorial ("Common Cents," March 24), I have developed a simple method to help Los Angeles save the $4 million it claims it costs to count the dollar bills collected on bus fares. Call me and I will pick up the uncounted fare. I will then separate $1 million, which will then be neatly packaged and returned to the city. It is now $5 million ahead and hasn't had to do more than make a simple phone call. I plan to also propose this system to the U.S. government to save more millions that it must cost to count collected taxes.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 28, 1990
Throughout our lives my wife and I have enjoyed companionship of both dogs and cats who enriched our lives with their loyalty and devotion. For that reason, we will vote yes on Proposition C. Animals benefit from animal research. Vaccines developed from animal research now protect pets and domestic animals from diseases that were fatal not too long ago. Humans also are dependent on animal research. Medical procedures first tested on animals have saved the lives of uncounted humans.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 1, 1993
First, there are two Californias: Northern and Southern. Anyone who has been to both can tell you that except for the name the two have almost nothing in common. Your reporter misleadingly lumps them together. Second, he focuses on such vague notions as our faded image, our tarnished luster, and our declining promise. These are touchy-feely issues that mean little. He barely touches on what is the real problem--crime and violence in Los Angeles. Some hard facts of L.A. life for this 33-year resident: robbed twice, once with a knife to my throat, another with a gun to my head; shot at while driving down an L.A. street; three of my closest childhood friends dead from drugs; another shot to death last year over a meaningless argument, and my home burglarized twice.
OPINION
December 3, 2000
A contested presidential election leads to results that many of this nation's people are unwilling to accept. Deep in the South, a state legislature prepares a response. The action of its legislators will affect the entire country and will shape the future of the next four years. It happened in 1860, when the election of Abraham Lincoln led South Carolina to secede from the Union. This led to the Civil War. It is happening today in Tallahassee, as Florida's lawmakers prepare to award that state's electoral votes to George W. Bush.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 8, 1989 | JAY SHARBUTT, Times Staff Writer
In saloons, hotel rooms, second homes and college campuses, there is an uncounted army of network viewers whose numbers range between 4 million and 10 million, a senior ABC executive estimated Tuesday. And they should be included in national audience estimates, added Richard Montesano, ABC vice president for market research.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 8, 2001 | PATRICK McGREEVY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Two days after an election left him 289 votes short of opponent Jack Weiss, Tom Hayden's quest to join the Los Angeles City Council was hanging by a thread Thursday after the city clerk said there are as many as 1,900 uncounted ballots in the 5th District race. In the west San Fernando Valley's 3rd Council District, where police union director Dennis Zine had 132 votes more than Judith Hirshberg in the election night tally, the clerk said there may be as many as 1,400 uncounted ballots.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 6, 2012 | By Phil Willon, Los Angeles Times
Asking voters to slap a $1-per-pack tax on cigarettes to fund cancer research seems like a cinch in health-crazy California, where lighting up already is banned in bars, public buildings and on many of its golden beaches. But the tobacco tax, pitched to voters under Proposition 29 in Tuesday's primary, teetered on the brink of defeat Wednesday just months after opinion polls showed widespread support. The measure was trailing by about 63,000 votes, although still-uncounted ballots could number as high as 1 million, by some estimates.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 19, 2011 | By Jason Song, Los Angeles Times
The race between Bennett Kayser, the teachers union-backed candidate, and Luis Sanchez, the mayor's pick, for the Los Angeles Board of Education remained unclear Wednesday as Kayser claimed a thin lead and thousands of ballots still needed to be counted. Kayser, a retired educator, had received about 300 more votes than Sanchez, the chief of staff to the school board president, who was backed by Mayor Antonio Villaraigosa and several labor groups and other elected officials. But more than 13,000 ballots remained to be counted throughout the city, according to the city clerk's office, and many of them are for other races, not the runoff for the school board's 5th District, which stretches from Los Feliz to Maywood.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 24, 2010 | By Jack Leonard, Los Angeles Times
With the stack of ballots left to count sharply diminished, San Francisco Dist. Atty. Kamala Harris continued to hold a steady lead Tuesday in the race for attorney general, making victory over Los Angeles County Dist. Atty. Steve Cooley all but assured. Harris, the Democrat, led the Republican nominee by nearly 53,000 votes ? 4,385,438 to 4,332,596 ? according to a Times review of updated vote tallies in all 58 counties. Although the gap remains narrow in one of the closest statewide races in California history, the chance for Cooley to pick up enough votes to make up the difference appears increasingly remote.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 7, 2010 | By Phil Willon, Los Angeles Times
Los Angeles County Dist. Atty. Steve Cooley built a narrow lead Saturday in the race for California attorney general, according to figures released by state elections officials. With roughly 2 million ballots still waiting to be counted in the extremely tight race, the Republican candidate pulled ahead of San Francisco Dist. Atty. Kamala Harris by 22,817 votes, three-tenths of a point. Harris, a Democrat, had led the race by about 9,000 votes two days earlier. The race for attorney general is one of the closest in state history, and the California secretary of state's office says it may be weeks before all ballots are fully counted and a clear winner emerges.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 5, 2010 | By Phil Willon, Los Angeles Times
Nearly 2 million ballots across California remain uncounted in the wake of Tuesday's general election, with the state attorney general race hanging in the balance as the slow process of tallying the outstanding votes began in earnest Thursday, state elections officials said. San Francisco Dist. Atty. Kamala Harris, a Democrat, was leading Republican Steve Cooley, the district attorney of Los Angeles County, by just one-tenth of a percentage point ? or 9,364 of the 7,215,055 votes counted thus far in that contest, according to the secretary of state's office Thursday afternoon.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 4, 2010 | By Jack Leonard and David Zahniser, Times Staff Writers
Three hours after the election polls closed, Los Angeles County Dist. Atty. Steve Cooley strode onto a stage at the Beverly Hilton Hotel and gave supporters of his campaign for state attorney general some news to cheer. "Although my ? close advisors think it's a little too early, I'm declaring victory," he said to a roaring crowd. Early voting tallies showed Cooley with a comfortable lead. But within hours, his advantage had evaporated. By Wednesday morning, Cooley's opponent, San Francisco Dist.
OPINION
January 12, 2005
Re "Who's Counting Beans Now?" editorial, Jan. 8: The Times is quite right to point out Gov. Arnold Schwarzenegger's newfound concern about mandated spending. It was also on solid footing when it chastised the Democratic Legislature for its profligacy when our fiscal crisis reached critical mass during the recall campaign. However, I'm waiting for one more editorial. That would be the one that confesses The Times did everything in its rhetorical power to encourage the free-spending ways of our politicians.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 10, 1994 | LEN HALL
About 550 potentially crucial uncounted ballots in the close City Council race could be tallied as soon as today, city officials said Thursday. Most of the uncounted ballots were mailed or were absentee ballots filed on Election Day, said Rosalyn Lever, an assistant to the county registrar of voters. She said there is also an unspecified number of ballots that were not counted because they contained write-in candidates or were somehow damaged by the counting machines.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 10, 2010 | By Phil Willon, Los Angeles Times
A Superior Court judge on Friday ordered Riverside County to tally more than 12,500 mail-in ballots that arrived a day after the polls closed in the June 8 primary, a decision that could alter the outcome of a neck-and-neck legislative race. A 12-vote margin separates Mary Salas and Juan Vargas in the Democratic race for state Senate District 40, which includes Imperial County and slivers of Riverside and San Diego counties. "It's very close, so we're certainly optimistic," said Barry Klein, campaign manager for Salas, an assemblywoman from Chula Vista who narrowly trails Vargas.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 31, 2009 | Teresa Watanabe
With sprawling enclaves of immigrants, crowded housing conditions and pockets of deep poverty, Los Angeles is regarded as the nation's most difficult county for census-takers to count. But as they gear up for the decennial census beginning in April, officials are beefing up efforts to reach the region's far-flung polyglot communities with more community outreach staff and language assistance, including a first-ever bilingual English-Spanish census form. At a meeting last week in downtown Los Angeles, U.S. census officials met with Gov. Arnold Schwarzenegger, dozens of community activists, nonprofit leaders and state and local government representatives to craft strategies on how to reach the 4.4 million people who live in "hard-to-count" neighborhoods in Los Angeles County.
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