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Undecided Voters

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NEWS
October 17, 2012 | By David Lauter
How much benefit President Obama will garner from his improved performance at Tuesday night's second presidential debate could depend heavily on the answer to a second question: Who was it that moved to Mitt Romney's side over the last two weeks? The often-heard answer to that question is that Romney's strong performance at the first debate in Denver on Oct. 3 won over undecided swing voters. For months, those voters - or at least the ones in battleground states - saw a barrage of negative advertisements about Romney from Obama and his allies.
ARTICLES BY DATE
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 20, 2013 | By Jean Merl, Los Angeles Times
Los Angeles City Atty. Carmen Trutanich has a steep hill to climb to keep his job in next month's election, a new USC Price/L.A. Times poll has found. Challenger Mike Feuer, a former city and state lawmaker, held a lead of more than 11 percentage points over Trutanich, drawing support from 36.8% of voters, compared with 25.5% favoring the incumbent. With about a month to go before election day, nearly 38% of the voters surveyed had not made up their minds. The USC Sol Price School of Public Policy/L.A.
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NATIONAL
October 28, 2012 | By Seema Mehta, Los Angeles Times
FINDLAY, Ohio - His planned events in Virginia canceled by a giant storm off the Atlantic coast, Mitt Romney campaigned across another key state Sunday, offering dual arguments that President Obama has taken the country in the wrong direction and that his Republican administration would work with Democrats to accomplish his goals. The targets appeared to be twofold: to remind Romney supporters of their aversion to a second Obama term, and to convince wobbling and undecided voters to give him a chance.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 2, 2013 | By Jean Merl, Los Angeles Times
With large numbers of Los Angeles voters yet to make up their minds, a new poll shows that first-term City Atty. Carmen Trutanich is struggling to stay afloat as Tuesday's primary election approaches. Trutanich is in a statistical dead heat for second place with private attorney Greg Smith. Former lawmaker Mike Feuer enjoys a slight edge over both as the three candidates battle to advance to an expected May runoff. Feuer, who served on the City Council and then in the state Assembly representing the city's Westside, was the choice of 23.8% of those surveyed for the USC Sol Price School of Public Policy/L.A.
OPINION
October 14, 2012 | Doyle McManus
What do undecided voters want from presidential candidates, anyway? Not much. Just clearer answers, a sense of firm leadership - and a credible promise that the next four years will bring more bipartisan cooperation than the last four. "I'll vote for the person that gives me the most clarity," Calvin Smith, 70, a retired high school teacher in Columbus, Ohio, said last week. "I've heard enough visions. I want concrete, step-by-step instructions. " PHOTOS: 2012 vice presidential debate In a polarized election year, the dwindling ranks of undecided voters have become objects of wonderment and even ridicule.
NATIONAL
September 30, 2012 | By David Lauter, Washington Bureau
WASHINGTON - For Mitt Romney, making a comeback in the race for president will require changing the minds of voters like Barry Hubscher, Cathleen Kimmel and Michael Gray. All three had considered voting for the Republican nominee as recently as August, but lately they have found themselves leaning toward President Obama. Listening to them and others like them helps explain the shift in polls toward Obama since the Democratic convention and illustrates the magnitude of the task that lies before Romney as he tries to catch up in an increasingly challenging race.
NATIONAL
September 13, 2012 | By David Horsey
Undecided voters, you can run but you cannot hide. Turn on your TV and find wall-to-wall attack ads designed to scare you. Answer your phone and find pollsters trying to pick your brain. Answer the door and somebody hoping to win your vote will be on your doorstep - maybe even an actual candidate for president or vice president.  Polls indicate 98% of Americans have made up their minds about the choice between President Obama and Mitt Romney. That makes the 2 percent who are still thinking it over (or failing to think about it at all)
NATIONAL
July 26, 2004 | Stephanie Simon, Times Staff Writer
Sen. John F. Kerry has a lot of work to do this week in Boston. He needs to persuade Joe Damico, a computer programmer from Ohio, that he's tough enough to lead the nation into war. He must convince Joe Moragues, who repairs tractors in Florida, that he can spread prosperity to the watermelon fields there -- and to little guys all across America.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 28, 2010 | By Michael Mishak, Los Angeles Times
Locked in a tight race for the governor's office, Republican Meg Whitman and Democrat Jerry Brown will face-off in their first debate Tuesday evening, hoping to move a legion of undecided voters into their column. The event, which will take place on the campus of UC Davis and air live at 6 p.m. on various broadcast outlets, is the first of three matchups for the major candidates. The gubernatorial contest has been stuck in a dead heat for months, despite a summer-long advertising battle between Whitman and organized labor groups backing Brown, who launched his own ads this month.
NEWS
May 29, 1986 | DOUGLAS SHUIT, Times Staff Writer
Republican Mike Curb, in his drive to recapture the lieutenant governor's office, will wind up his comparatively low-key primary campaign by spending between $250,000 and $300,000 on a last-week statewide television blitz. His primary opponent, state Sen. H. L. Richardson of Glendora, also is depending heavily on television to try to pick up what polls show to be large numbers of undecided voters.
BUSINESS
October 30, 2012 | By Marc Lifsher
SACRAMENTO -- Backing for Proposition 37, the genetically engineered food labeling initiative, is falling, fast. A new poll by the California Business Roundtable and the Pepperdine University School of Public Policy showed 39.1% of likely voters support the measure, while 50.5% oppose the labeling requirement. Undecided voters represented 10.5% of respondents. The results released Tuesday show a a drop in support of nine percentage points since a similar survey just over two weeks ago. "It seems voters have been influenced by both the No campaign and a barrage of negative editorials" in newspapers around the state, said Chris Condon of M4 Strategies, which conducted the poll of all 11 initiatives on the Nov. 6 ballot.
NATIONAL
October 28, 2012 | By Seema Mehta, Los Angeles Times
FINDLAY, Ohio - His planned events in Virginia canceled by a giant storm off the Atlantic coast, Mitt Romney campaigned across another key state Sunday, offering dual arguments that President Obama has taken the country in the wrong direction and that his Republican administration would work with Democrats to accomplish his goals. The targets appeared to be twofold: to remind Romney supporters of their aversion to a second Obama term, and to convince wobbling and undecided voters to give him a chance.
NATIONAL
October 27, 2012 | By Seema Mehta and Kathleen Hennessey, Los Angeles Times
NORTH CANTON, Ohio - Appealing to the same voters through different strategies, President Obama and Mitt Romney forwarded their arguments across the key swing states on Friday as they kept an eye on an approaching storm that threatened their campaign travel. Romney hit Iowa and Ohio, criticizing new economic reports as evidence of a need for change in the White House and painting a troubling picture of a second Obama term. "You see, if he's reelected you're going to have the status quo. You're going to have more of the same for four years," Romney told thousands at a rally in bitterly cold weather on a high school football field.
NATIONAL
October 22, 2012 | By Paul West and Alana Semuels, Los Angeles Times
BOCA RATON, Fla. - Foreign policy may be the topic, but undecided voters will be the targets when Mitt Romney and President Obama hold their third and final debate Monday night. Mobilizing supporters is a priority for both men. It is especially vital for Obama, whose backers are less likely to vote than Romney's, polls indicate. But with the latest opinion surveys showing the race dead even, it is increasingly likely that the next president will be chosen by a relatively tiny group: swing-state voters who have yet to commit firmly to either candidate.
NEWS
October 17, 2012 | By Seema Mehta
CHESAPEAKE, Va. - Showing the importance of undecided women voters in the presidential contest, Mitt Romney is airing a new ad aimed at reassuring them about his position on contraception and abortion. In the ad, a woman says she is concerned that she has heard that Romney opposes all abortion and contraception, but she Googles his views and finds he does not oppose contraception “at all” and allows for abortion in the cases of rape, incest or if the life of the mother is at stake.
NEWS
October 17, 2012 | By David Lauter
How much benefit President Obama will garner from his improved performance at Tuesday night's second presidential debate could depend heavily on the answer to a second question: Who was it that moved to Mitt Romney's side over the last two weeks? The often-heard answer to that question is that Romney's strong performance at the first debate in Denver on Oct. 3 won over undecided swing voters. For months, those voters - or at least the ones in battleground states - saw a barrage of negative advertisements about Romney from Obama and his allies.
NATIONAL
January 17, 2004 | Nick Anderson and Maria L. La Ganga, Times Staff Writers
John F. Kerry talked a populist line Friday and defended his record on agriculture. Dick Gephardt attacked his rivals on trade policy. John Edwards embarked on a trek across Iowa, and Howard Dean traversed the midsection of the state, from south to north. Three days before the crucial Iowa caucuses, the four leading Democratic presidential candidates and hundreds of their fired-up field workers scoured the state for the support needed to break out of a tightly bunched pack.
NEWS
October 15, 1988 | JAMES GERSTENZANG and BOB DROGIN, Times Staff Writers
Democratic presidential nominee Michael S. Dukakis, his voice hoarse and his mood upbeat, fought all day Friday to give his underdog campaign the boost that his debate against George Bush did not. From a black church in South-Central Los Angeles, to the sunny state Capitol steps in Sacramento, to a rain-soaked rally in Seattle, and in new TV ads, Dukakis warned darkly of a Republican future as he attempted to win undecided voters in the campaign's final 3 1/2 weeks.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 17, 2012 | By Mary McNamara, Los Angeles Times
Based on Tuesday night's presidential debate at Hofstra University in New York, here is a five-point plan: -- Moderator Candy Crowley, like Supreme Court justices, should be appointed for life. -- The town hall format, which allows the candidates to circle each other like prize fighters or come nose-to-nose like bickering spouses, is the best. As the Sundance Kid so famously said, "I'm better when I move. " -- CNN, seriously, lose that undecided voter crawl. It is completely distracting and simply absurd - how much value can there be in the real-time reactions of 35 undecided voters in Ohio?
NATIONAL
October 17, 2012 | By David Horsey
If the Barack Obama who showed up for the second presidential debate had shown up for the first debate, there is a good chance Republicans would now be sullenly turning their thoughts to 2016 and arguing over how they got tricked into nominating a loser two elections in a row. The Obama who did show up for that first debate breathed new life into Romney's candidacy by being lifeless himself. Tuesday night, though, the president was in command. He reinvigorated his own campaign by delivering the best debate performance of his political career.
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