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Undercover Agent

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 27, 2014 | By Patrick McGreevy
SACRAMENTO -- An FBI affidavit released Wednesday alleged that state Sen. Leland Yee (D-San Francisco) accepted $21,000 in campaign payments from an undercover FBI agent posing as someone in the marijuana business to arrange meetings with two unidentified state lawmakers in 2013. On Thursday, that allegation had legislators going back through calendars and notes to see if they were the ones referred to. Three lawmakers reached by The Times who were involved with bills regulating marijuana said it does not appear they met with anyone on the issue through Yee's alleged arrangement, but other legislators have not yet returned calls.
ARTICLES BY DATE
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 10, 2014 | By Lisa Girion and Scott Glover
A doctor has been indicted on federal drug trafficking charges for allegedly turning his East Los Angeles and San Gabriel clinics into lucrative mills where he doled out prescriptions for powerful painkillers and other widely abused medications in exchange for cash. Dr. Andrew S. Sun, 78, of La Mirada, surrendered to federal authorities and was expected to be arraigned Thursday. Sun faces 24 counts of prescribing Vicodin, Xanax, a cough syrup with codeine known on the street as "Purple Drank" and other dangerous narcotics to undercover agents who had no medical need for the drugs.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 24, 1996 | PAUL H. JOHNSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
For six months, Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco and Firearms Agent Paul Day worked undercover as a drug dealer and gun runner in Riverside, gaining the confidence of gang members with names such as Danger, Chaos and Godfather. The men routinely drew their weapons and taunted Day, trying to intimidate him. Once, moments after Day had purchased some rock cocaine, his backup team was discovered by the gang's members, who engaged in a shootout--and later bragged about it to Day.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 5, 2014 | By Paige St. John
SACRAMENTO - A portion of the bribe money federal prosecutors say undercover FBI agents gave to state Sen. Leland Yee made its way into public campaign finance disclosures. The Times found $17,300 in contributions that match the dates and amounts, and sometimes circumstances, of payments detailed in an FBI agent's affidavit released the day the veteran lawmaker was arrested in a sting operation. According to that affidavit, the money was intended to buy influence for the New Jersey mob, secure state business, foster legislation governing marijuana dispensaries and help set up an international arms deal.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 3, 1989 | STEVE EMMONS, Times Staff Writer
An undercover agent who worked with Orange County Sheriff-Coroner Brad Gates' intelligence unit said the sheriff had "a bounty" out on then-Municipal Judge Bobby D. Youngblood and would "pay handsomely" for evidence that could convict the judge of involvement with cocaine, an attorney testified Thursday in U.S. District Court. Youngblood was a harsh critic of Gates in the mid-1980s and eventually ran against him for sheriff.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 27, 2014 | By Patrick McGreevy
SACRAMENTO -- A Senate leader may have solved one mystery raised in an FBI affidavit released after the arrest Wednesday of state Sen. Leland Yee (D-San Francisco) on suspicion of wire fraud and firearms trafficking: the identity of "State Senator 2. " The affidavit alleges that Yee accepted $21,000 in campaign payments from an undercover FBI agent posing as an Arizona man in the medical marijuana business to arrange meetings with two unidentified state lawmakers in 2013. On Aug. 26, 2013, Yee introduced the undercover agent to a legislator identified in the affidavit only as "State Senator 2" and Yee received $10,000 for his seceretary of state campaign for that introduction, the document alleges.
NATIONAL
December 26, 2011 | By Richard A. Serrano, Washington Bureau
First, he preached the Gospel in South Los Angeles. Then he picked up a badge and gun as an LAPD officer working the Wilshire Division. From there, he moved to the FBI, serving as an undercover agent in Los Angeles, then in Tennessee. His life, he said, was "my American dream. " But now Darin McAllister is in federal prison in eastern Kentucky, serving a four-year sentence as part of a Justice Department investigation into mortgage fraud. His life today, he says, is "my American nightmare.
SPORTS
February 14, 1989 | Associated Press
FBI agents arrested Oklahoma quarterback Charles Thompson Monday night on a complaint of allegedly selling cocaine to an undercover agent, authorities said. FBI spokesman Dan Vogel said Thompson was arrested in Norman, Okla., on a federal complaint that he allegedly sold 17 grams of cocaine for $1,400 to an undercover agent Jan. 26. Thompson will appear before a U.S. magistrate today, Vogel said. Thompson was escorted from the Oklahoma County Courthouse to the jail elevator. He had no comment.
NEWS
January 19, 1990 | RICHARD C. PADDOCK and PAUL JACOBS, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
State Sen. Joseph B. Montoya, continuing to defend himself on corruption charges, contended Thursday he was set up by a federal undercover agent who gave him a $3,000 check at a videotaped breakfast meeting. Undergoing a second day of grueling cross-examination, Montoya also testified that he proposed the $3,000 figure in order "to put a little bit of a limitation" on the amount he would receive from the undercover agent, who was posing as a Southern businessman.
NEWS
April 7, 1988 | PAUL HOUSTON, Times Staff Writer
A pilot told a Senate hearing Wednesday that his firm contracted with the State Department to fly clothing to Nicaragua's Contras in 1986 at the same time he was operating as an undercover drug smuggler for two federal agencies. Michael Palmer, appearing under heavy guard, said that before he started working for the government in his extraordinary dual role, he had illegitimately smuggled $40 million worth of marijuana into the United States from South America over an eight-year period.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 27, 2014 | By Patrick McGreevy
SACRAMENTO -- An FBI affidavit released Wednesday alleged that state Sen. Leland Yee (D-San Francisco) accepted $21,000 in campaign payments from an undercover FBI agent posing as someone in the marijuana business to arrange meetings with two unidentified state lawmakers in 2013. On Thursday, that allegation had legislators going back through calendars and notes to see if they were the ones referred to. Three lawmakers reached by The Times who were involved with bills regulating marijuana said it does not appear they met with anyone on the issue through Yee's alleged arrangement, but other legislators have not yet returned calls.
NEWS
March 27, 2014 | By Cathleen Decker
It's only Thursday, but this week in politics already has offered more than a few reminders of the basic rules. To wit: --Never diss the home team.  --Check the video, carefully. --Assume that words spoken in private will soon become very public. --And, when worrying aloud about undercover federal agents, make sure the person you're speaking to isn't one. --- --- --- Basketball is more than a sport in Kentucky. Its rivalries are deep and generational, its defeats neither forgotten nor forgiven.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 27, 2014 | By Patrick McGreevy
SACRAMENTO -- A Senate leader may have solved one mystery raised in an FBI affidavit released after the arrest Wednesday of state Sen. Leland Yee (D-San Francisco) on suspicion of wire fraud and firearms trafficking: the identity of "State Senator 2. " The affidavit alleges that Yee accepted $21,000 in campaign payments from an undercover FBI agent posing as an Arizona man in the medical marijuana business to arrange meetings with two unidentified state lawmakers in 2013. On Aug. 26, 2013, Yee introduced the undercover agent to a legislator identified in the affidavit only as "State Senator 2" and Yee received $10,000 for his seceretary of state campaign for that introduction, the document alleges.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 26, 2014 | By Patrick McGreevy
SACRAMENTO -- An FBI affidavit alleging that state Sen. Leland Yee (D-San Francisco) offered to set up an arms deal paints a starkly different picture of Yee than his public persona as a supporter of gun control and advocate against gun violence. In 2006, Yee was named to the Gun Violence Prevention Honor Roll by the Brady Campaign for his efforts that included co-authoring a first-in-the-nation bill to require new semiautomatic handguns to be equipped with ballistics identification technology known as micro-stamping.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 19, 2013 | From KTLA
A former Animal Plant television host pleaded guilty Tuesday to charges connected to selling endangered lizards to an undercover federal agent . Donald Schultz appeared in federal court in Los Angeles Tuesday, pleading guilty to violating the Endangered Species Act by offering to sell, and selling, two live desert monitor lizards in interstate commerce, according to the U.S. attorney's office in Los Angeles. Schultz, a native South African who appears on television as an expert on dangerous wildlife, was the host of Animal Planet's “Wild Recon,” which aired 10 episodes in 2010.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 5, 2013 | By Rick Rojas
The Moreno Valley city councilman leaned back in his chair, his hands resting on his head as he took in the sight of stacks of bills - $2.3 million worth - piled on the table in front of him. On that January day, Marcelo Co looked relaxed as he closed a lucrative deal to deliver the necessary vote to rezone a parcel of land, believing he had accepted a bribe from a real estate broker, federal prosecutors said. But the broker was actually an undercover federal agent, and the transaction - one that authorities believe to be the largest bribe accepted by a public official in a sting operation in the United States - was captured on camera.
NEWS
February 24, 1988 | PAUL DEAN, Times Staff Writer
Special Agent Paul Seema had all the edges. Born in Thailand, he had worked its borders and jungle runs and at 51 was a unique and experienced hand on Asia, its drug dealers and their quickness to kill. But in Los Angeles, it wasn't enough. Special Agent George Montoya was younger but had caution. He was a meticulous arranger, an orderly 34-year-old with a knack for working any program and balancing its odds in his favor.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 10, 2012 | By Victoria Kim, Los Angeles Times
An undercover FBI agent on a case of weapons smuggling from the Philippines to the United States denied a defense attorney's allegation that he paid for sex for himself and the suspects using taxpayer dollars. The agent, a 16-year veteran who was not identified by name in court documents because he is working undercover in a separate investigation, in a sworn declaration strongly denied allegations of what a public defender contended was "outrageous government misconduct" and should be grounds for the case to be thrown out. Federal prosecutors have acknowledged that the government paid for $14,500 in expenses incurred by the agent for entertainment, cocktails and tips over the course of the investigation.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 4, 2013 | By David Zahniser
A man posing as a studio executive, but apparently actually working as an undercover FBI agent targeting state Sen. Ronald S. Calderon (D-Montebello), contacted Los Angeles City Councilman Jose Huizar's office last year with questions about city permits. Records and interviews indicate the agent represented himself as Rocky Patel, president of Los Angeles-based United Pacific Studios. Sometime last year, the councilman's spokesman said, Patel apparently sought information on securing a conditional use permit for a production studio in Huizar's district.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 3, 2013 | George Skelton, Capitol Journal
SACRAMENTO - It just can't be, what they're saying about state Sen. Ronald S. Calderon - that he took $60,000 in bribes during an FBI sting operation. Nobody these days could be that stupid. Right? Pocketing the money from essentially a stranger who turns out to be an undercover agent? I mean, only 25 years after a highly publicized FBI sting in the Capitol resulted in the convictions of 14 politicos - legislators, staffers, lobbyists - in what became known as Shrimpscam.
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