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Undergraduate Education

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NEWS
May 23, 1985 | DAVID G. SAVAGE, Times Education Writer
A group of UCLA seniors got together on Wednesday to deliver a forceful message to the university's faculty and administration: Undergraduate education at the Westwood campus is vastly overrated. The seniors complained that most classes are large and impersonal, that professors seem far more interested in research than teaching and that the 19,000 undergraduates believe they are ignored on the huge campus.
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BUSINESS
July 26, 2013
The gig: As president of the Los Angeles Business Council, Mary Leslie, 53, covers a lot of ground. On any given day, she might be meeting with major contributors to evaluate progress on a grant, driving to the San Fernando Valley to check out a fledgling solar installation company or researching an initiative to stop storm runoff from reaching the ocean. In spare moments, she will plot out the finer details of an upcoming summit, where government representatives, business leaders and academics will convene to solve nagging problems in housing, transportation and jobs.
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NEWS
September 9, 1986 | ANNE C. ROARK, Times Education Writer
Acknowledging that undergraduate education is "something of a neglected child" at the University of California, a faculty task force is calling for "the most brilliant and effective teachers, regardless of title and rank," to take a more active role in undergraduate education, including the teaching of large, introductory lower-division courses.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 14, 2013 | By Los Angeles Times Staff
Three boys arrested this week on felony charges for allegedly sexually assaulting Audrie Pott, the Saratoga High School sophomore who committed suicide after the incident, had been cited by authorities last fall. Authorities this week alleged that Pott, 15, was assaulted last fall by the three boys, one of whom snapped a picture of the alleged attack. The photo quickly circulated among Pott's classmates. She wrote on her Facebook page that it was the “worst day ever,” according to her family's attorney, Robert Allard.
NEWS
March 3, 1991 | LARRY GORDON, TIMES EDUCATION WRITER
Nearly a year ago, Stanford University President Donald Kennedy provoked a national debate with his declaration that too much emphasis on scholarly research was hurting classroom teaching. Today, Kennedy is following up with what experts say may be the most comprehensive plan in the nation to put undergraduate learning back at the center of big university life.
OPINION
February 24, 1991 | David Glidden, David Glidden is a professor of philosophy at the University of California, Riverside.
Public universities suffer business cycles badly. Only a year ago, the University of California was contemplating three new campuses. Now it cannot pay its bills. The UC administration is threatening to turn away qualified students. The Board of Regents has raised student fees. Universities go wrong, not from ill intentions, but from confusing ends with means. They become what National Endowment for the Humanities Chairman Lynne V. Cheney calls "tyrannical machines."
NEWS
December 26, 1985
The Ford Foundation announced plans to award grants totaling $4.75 million in the next two years to help 39 colleges and universities--of which seven are in California--recruit teachers and improve their undergraduate curricula. The foundation said it is acting partly in response to a spate of recent studies that have questioned the quality of undergraduate education.
OPINION
March 22, 1992 | BRIAN FAGAN, BRIAN FAGAN, a professor of anthropology at UC Santa Barbara, commented on state Legislative Analyst Elizabeth Hill's call for increased teaching loads for UC instructors. He told The Times:
Most UC faculty work long hours in the classroom. It is insulting to suggest otherwise. We are already stretched too thin, meeting legitimate obligations not only of teaching but of university and public service and research. The debate about undergraduate education ignores fundamental issues. The basic question is not that of teaching loads, but of complex problems in the classroom. How do we break down the anonymity of large classes?
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 29, 1988
The University of California is facing a period of surging enrollments and growth. If the top 12.5% of California's high-school students are to continue to be admitted, the present nine campuses will have to expand or a new campus will have to be added, or perhaps both. A critical connected issue is whether undergraduate education should continue to take a back seat to graduate programs and faculty research.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 25, 1986
What complaints do California State University faculty members hear from students? The more classes you go to, the less excited you are about learning. You can't find a professor to talk to. They want memorized answers, not original ideas. A new report from the Cal State academic senate says that there is validity in these and other complaints, and it proposes some answers for serious consideration during Sacramento's review of California's master plan for higher education.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 13, 2013 | By Kate Mather
A candlelight vigil has been planned for next week to honor Audrie Pott, the Saratoga High School sophomore who committed suicide after three boys allegedly sexually assaulted her. The vigil, announced on the Facebook page set up by a foundation named in her honor, comes amid growing outrage over the case. "We would appreciate it if potential attendees would wear teal. Thank you for your continued support," organizers said about the April 19 event. The foundation also urged anyone with information about the case to come forward: "If students have information about this crime, if they saw pictures or know anything that will assist in bringing these young men to justice, please come forward.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 28, 2012 | By Frank Shyong, Los Angeles Times
Taiwan's minister of education, Wei-Ling Chiang, traveled to California last week to address a rarely discussed trade imbalance with the United States. "Just 3,561 American-born students are enrolled in Taiwanese universities, while about 24,000 Taiwanese students enroll in universities in the U.S," Chiang said. "We really have to address the situation now. " Concerned about a brain drain, Taiwanese education officials and top public universities are renewing their efforts to enroll more international students.
BUSINESS
January 15, 2012 | Liz Weston, Money Talk
Dear Liz: I have an 18-year-old daughter who wants to attend a private, out-of-state school. I don't have any money saved for her education and do not make enough to cover the cost of this college. What are my options? She's an A student and is planning to go to medical school. Answer: You need to have the conversation you probably should have initiated a few years ago, before she started the college application process. She must understand that what she wants and what you can afford to provide for her may be two very different things.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 18, 2010 | Dennis McLellan
Charles Muscatine, a world-renowned Chaucer scholar and a longtime advocate for higher education reform who was fired as a young assistant professor of English at UC Berkeley when he refused to sign a loyalty oath during the Red Scare of the 1950s, has died. He was 89. Muscatine died of an infection March 12 at Kaiser Permanente Medical Center in Oakland, said his daughter, Lissa Muscatine. "Chuck Muscatine was a vital figure in the political leadership of the Berkeley faculty all the way from the loyalty oath controversy through the Free Speech Movement," said David A. Hollinger, a professor of history at UC Berkeley.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 13, 2000 | From a Times Staff Writer
Michael R. Gottfredson, vice president of undergraduate education at the University of Arizona, will be UC Irvine's next executive vice chancellor, the No. 2 position at the school. Gottfredson will succeed William J. Lillyman, who is retiring after 28 years at UCI as a professor and holder of a variety of administrative positions. Gottfredson, 49, also is a researcher and writer on crime and the criminal justice system.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 4, 1998
Re "An Academic Bill of Rights," April 29: The Carnegie Foundation for the Advancement of Teaching is right to identify undergraduate education as a key priority for America's research universities. But the foundation's latest report on this subject presents a distorted picture because it gives short shrift to the many steps that have been taken in recent years to strengthen undergraduate education on research university campuses. For example, the foundation is way behind the curve in urging research universities to "[involve]
NEWS
February 6, 1994
Hollywood Hills resident Richard S. Ide, interim dean of humanities at the USC College of Letters, Arts and Sciences, has been named vice provost for undergraduate studies. He will assume the post in July. Ide will be responsible for the coordination of USC's undergraduate education policies. He also will serve as associate dean of the university's Leavey Library, where he will assist in the development of library-based teaching and learning programs.
OPINION
September 14, 1986
A faculty task force is making an important contribution to strengthening the University of California by urging the improvement of undergraduate education. The timeliness of the report is underscored by the fact that several of the UC campuses already are actively engaged in seeking solutions to the problems. For every great university there inevitably is a continuous struggle to create an appropriate balance among its various functions.
NEWS
December 15, 1997 | JONATHAN LEVI, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
There are two ways to think of Leon Botstein's new opus "Jefferson's Children" this holiday season: as a gift or as required reading. For a Harvard-educated doctor who wonders how much TV her 1-year-old should watch. For a cousin out in Brooklyn who doesn't vote. For a divorced friend who struggles daily with her dropout son. For elementary school teachers in Bayonne, N.J., Milwaukee, Wis., and Montgomery, Ala., who are fighting for the basic right to give children a quality education.
OPINION
March 20, 1994 | GEOFFREY MARTIN, Geoffrey Martin is a senior journalism student at the University of Southern California
When the Western Assn. of Schools and Colleges recently approved a revised "statement on diversity," it crossed over from its traditional role of evaluating a curriculum's minimum standards into one of mandating what should be taught in the classroom. In effect, the association wants to enforce a multicultural code. In so doing, it is violating the autonomy of scholastic programs and infringing upon students' right to choose their courses. Donald R.
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