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Underground Railroad

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NEWS
June 10, 1998 | Associated Press
The secret network of churches, back roads, caves and other sites that made up the Underground Railroad, which helped slaves to freedom, would be preserved and linked under a bill approved Tuesday by the House. "This legislation can really foster a sense of racial harmony," said Rep. Rob Portman (R-Ohio), who sponsored the bill with Rep. Louis Stokes (D-Ohio). Stokes described the Civil War era network as a "dramatic protest against slavery" worth preserving.
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WORLD
January 15, 2012 | By John M. Glionna, Los Angeles Times
On his first day of freedom, North Korean defector Kim Yong-chul sat crossed-legged on the floor of a small apartment without a stick of furniture. He ate fried chicken and pork belly, washed down with celebratory shots of soju from a paper cup, toasting the stranger he says saved his life. Krys Lee is no stranger now. The Korean American writer is more like a fussy parent, worrying that the fortysomething refugee was drinking too much and might fall prey to other addictions in South Korea's culture of plenty.
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NATIONAL
December 15, 2004 | From Associated Press
A 300-year-old sycamore that served as a marker on the Underground Railroad and a meeting place for abolitionists including Frederick Douglass has been cut down after city officials said it was too badly damaged to save. The remains of "The Liberty Tree" were fed into a chipper Monday despite the efforts of residents who had tried to win National Register of Historic Places status for the tree and build a park and museum around it.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 21, 2010 | By Joan H. Haskins
"Harriet!" Mother called. "I need your help making chili sauce." Nine-year-old Harriet sauntered into the kitchen and plopped down at the table. She was in a bad mood. "Why did you name me Harriet?" she asked, with annoyance. "I hate it. I wish you'd named me Angel Puff or some cute name." Mother looked up from slicing the green peppers. "Because I wanted you to have a name you'd be proud of. You were named after Harriet Tubman, one of the greatest ladies in history. "Really?
NEWS
March 13, 1988 | ANITA HUSLIN, Associated Press
After nearly two decades of research and interviews, a black history author has given life to long-dead slaves and abolitionists in a new book that uses first-person narratives to convey the danger, excitement, tragedy and triumph of the Underground Railroad.
NEWS
February 13, 1994 | N.F. MENDOZA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Race to Freedom: The Underground Railroad has special meaning for one of its stars, Courtney Vance. The movie, executive produced by actor Tim Reid and Seaton McLean and airing on the Family Channel and BET, mirrors a chapter in Vance's own ancestry. "My great-grandfather, (a slave), killed a white man who had been repeatedly raping my great-grandmother," says Vance. "So his family and friends immediately put him on the Underground Railroad, to get him north."
NEWS
February 5, 2000 | MARK FRITZ, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Gus West bought some land, built a mansion and paid an artist to sketch the place for posterity. When his first wife died, he marked her grave with a marble monument that towered over the other tombstones. On the surface, he seemed like a prosperous man. Dig deeper and more elusive archives show that West grew up in Virginia, where he had to register regularly as a free black man living in a slave state.
NEWS
January 27, 2008 | Verena Dobnik, Associated Press
After years of battling the city, a group of New Yorkers has saved an old Brooklyn house they believe once sheltered slaves fleeing the South. The city has pledged it will not seize the property, which supporters say was a stop on the Underground Railroad and which was to be demolished to make room for an underground parking garage. The brick town house was one of seven old homes slated for demolition as part of the redevelopment of downtown Brooklyn, a commercial and civic center that today bears few traces of the residential neighborhood that stood before the Civil War. The other homes' fates are still unclear, but activists had a rare victory to celebrate in a larger conflict that has pitted the developers transforming Brooklyn against citizens trying to prevent the "Manhattanification" of the borough.
TRAVEL
August 8, 2004 | Jane Engle, Times Staff Writer
The $110-million National Underground Railroad Freedom Center, which opened last week in Cincinnati, hopes to do more than tell the epic history of the clandestine effort to free slaves from the pre-Civil War South. Spencer Crew, executive director and chief executive, called the center "a cultural institution of conscience," comparing it to the United States Holocaust Memorial Museum in Washington, D.C., and the Museum of Tolerance in Los Angeles.
NEWS
December 20, 1998 | SUSANNA RAY, ASSOCIATED PRESS
The two girls giggled nervously and shivered as they held hands and tried to keep up with nine others following a shouting woman down a moonlit hill. But the giggles quickly subsided to shocked silence as the woman's angry words sank in: "Hurry up! How am I gonna sell you with you acting so stupid?" Sell you? It was one of many almost-too-real moments in an unusual reenactment carried out in fields and woods on a recent cold night. Suddenly it was 1836.
WORLD
November 25, 2009 | By John M. Glionna
As he cased the security at the foreign embassies in Hanoi, the 78-year-old retiree was seized with sudden self-doubt. He was certainly no John le Carre. Who was he to play spy? But this wasn't a game. Waiting in nearby safe houses were nine North Korean defectors whom Kim Sang-hun had helped spirit into Vietnam from China -- among them a young doctor and his wife, a mother and daughter, and a woman who'd been sold as a sex slave in Beijing. "I thought, 'What am I doing here?
NEWS
January 27, 2008 | Verena Dobnik, Associated Press
After years of battling the city, a group of New Yorkers has saved an old Brooklyn house they believe once sheltered slaves fleeing the South. The city has pledged it will not seize the property, which supporters say was a stop on the Underground Railroad and which was to be demolished to make room for an underground parking garage. The brick town house was one of seven old homes slated for demolition as part of the redevelopment of downtown Brooklyn, a commercial and civic center that today bears few traces of the residential neighborhood that stood before the Civil War. The other homes' fates are still unclear, but activists had a rare victory to celebrate in a larger conflict that has pitted the developers transforming Brooklyn against citizens trying to prevent the "Manhattanification" of the borough.
NEWS
March 16, 2006 | From the Associated Press
A national museum commemorating the Underground Railroad is $5.5 million in the red just 18 months after opening, and officials said they will seek public money to continue operations. When the National Underground Railroad Freedom Center opened in Cincinnati in August 2004 with an annual budget of more than $10 million, officials said they would rely on admissions, donations and grants. But the center's chief executive, John Pepper, said income has not met expectations.
TRAVEL
February 19, 2006 | Vani Rangachar,, Times staff writer
Before the Civil War, thousands of slaves were able to escape to the free Northern states with the help of the Underground Railroad. Some of the places associated with the effort to emancipate slaves still exist and can be toured. Below are some sites significant in black history; more can be found at the National Underground Railroad Freedom Center in Cincinnati, www.freedomcenter.org, and National Park Service websites, www.nps.gov/ugrr and www.cr.nps.gov.
NEWS
September 18, 2005 | John Christoffersen, Associated Press Writer
Up a steep, narrow road in a remote part of this small town is an old icehouse with only the four stone walls still standing. A tunnel runs from the icehouse more than 20 feet and stops, but the mystery surrounding it has lingered for generations. Legend has it that the property was a stop on the Underground Railroad, and a team of archeological experts from Central Connecticut State University spent several days in August digging at the site for clues.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 24, 2005 | Janet Wilson, Times Staff Writer
Paddy's no show dog. He's a mid-size, aging brown mutt; shaggy, with white eye rings that give him a worried look, and a smell that's hard to ignore. Dogs like Paddy abound at animal shelters across America. He was once a pound dog himself, back in Tennessee. But that was before. Now he lives in California with a woman who saw him on the Internet and just had to have him.
NEWS
March 16, 2006 | From the Associated Press
A national museum commemorating the Underground Railroad is $5.5 million in the red just 18 months after opening, and officials said they will seek public money to continue operations. When the National Underground Railroad Freedom Center opened in Cincinnati in August 2004 with an annual budget of more than $10 million, officials said they would rely on admissions, donations and grants. But the center's chief executive, John Pepper, said income has not met expectations.
NATIONAL
August 2, 2005 | Nicholas Riccardi, Times Staff Writer
Roxxanne Vigil rushed home from a barbecue one recent Wednesday night to find her back door open and the fugitives she was hiding gone. Neighbors had called her cellphone, warning that the police were at her house in northwest Denver. The officers had left by the time Vigil returned, but they'd left a notice on the front door. The clock was ticking: She had seven days before the fugitives would be executed. Vigil, 19, consulted her sister and mother.
NATIONAL
December 15, 2004 | From Associated Press
A 300-year-old sycamore that served as a marker on the Underground Railroad and a meeting place for abolitionists including Frederick Douglass has been cut down after city officials said it was too badly damaged to save. The remains of "The Liberty Tree" were fed into a chipper Monday despite the efforts of residents who had tried to win National Register of Historic Places status for the tree and build a park and museum around it.
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