Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsUndersecretary
IN THE NEWS

Undersecretary

MORE STORIES ABOUT:
FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
February 14, 1991 | Associated Press
President Bush will nominate John G. Keller Jr., his chief advance man, as undersecretary of commerce for travel and tourism.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NATIONAL
November 13, 2012 | By David Willman, Los Angeles Times
Homeland Security Secretary Janet Napolitano's top expert on anti-terrorism technology has privately advised her to spike a long-planned, multibillion-dollar upgrade of BioWatch, the nation's troubled system for detecting a biological attack. Dr. Tara O'Toole, the department's undersecretary for science and technology, doubts that the so-called Generation 3 version of BioWatch could be relied on to detect anthrax, smallpox, plague or other deadly germs in the event of a biological attack, scientists familiar with the matter said.
Advertisement
BUSINESS
June 10, 1987
Rodney J. Blonien, formerly undersecretary of California's Youth and Adult Correctional Agency, has been named a partner of the international law firm of Finley, Kumble, Wagner, Heine, Underberg, Manley, Myerson & Casey and will head the firm's Sacramento branch.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 5, 2011 | By Rong-Gong Lin II, Los Angeles Times
Lawrence S. Eagleburger, the wisecracking, chain-smoking diplomat who charmed both Republicans and Democrats, handled tense assignments during the first Persian Gulf War and rose up the ranks to become secretary of State toward the end of President George H.W. Bush's administration, has died. He was 80. Eagleburger died Saturday after a short illness in Charlottesville, Va., a family spokeswoman told the Associated Press. No other details were given. Eagleburger headed the State Department for about five months.
NEWS
July 13, 1985 | Associated Press
President Reagan will nominate George D. Gould of New York, chairman and chief executive officer of Madison Resources Inc., as undersecretary of the Treasury, the White House announced Friday.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 22, 1985 | From Times Wire Services
Nicholas Eden, son of former British Prime Minister Anthony Eden and a former undersecretary in Prime Minister Margaret Thatcher's cabinet, has died at age 54 after a long illness, it was reported Tuesday. Nicholas became Earl of Avon on his father's death in 1977. The title will now lapse because Nicholas Eden never married and there are no heirs to the title, created in 1961 to honor his father. Anthony Eden was prime minister from 1955 to 1957.
NEWS
June 5, 1987 | Associated Press
A Harvard University professor accused of assaulting a woman has withdrawn from consideration as a potential nominee for the No. 2 post at the Department of Education, a department official said today. Bill Kristol, chief of staff to Education Secretary William J. Bennett, said Glenn C. Loury withdrew his name Monday, citing personal and family reasons. On Thursday, Loury was accused of assault by Pamela Foster of Boston. She said in the police report that her address was the same as Loury's.
NEWS
April 9, 1989 | From United Press International and
Assistant Agriculture Secretary Ewen Wilson, one of the Agriculture Department's top economics officers for four years, said Friday he will leave government May 6 to seek private employment. Wilson joined the department in 1985 as deputy assistant secretary for economics and moved into his current post in 1987. In a letter to Agriculture Secretary Clayton Yeutter, he said Friday, "The time has come to move on." The decision means Yeutter will have few, if any, holdovers from the Reagan era. President Bush has named new people for deputy secretary, undersecretary for commodity programs and for four assistant posts.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 14, 2008 | From the Associated Press
Ned Rifkin, the Smithsonian Institution's undersecretary for art, will leave the post in April. Rifkin, 58, who has overseen eight art museums since 2004, is the only one of the Smithsonian's top five officials who isn't serving an interim appointment. Former Secretary Lawrence Small resigned in March 2007 amid scrutiny of his spending and compensation. The Smithsonian Board of Regents is searching for a new secretary, and a decision is expected this month. Cristian Samper has been serving as acting secretary for the last year.
NEWS
February 20, 1986 | Associated Press
John R. Norton III, the acting secretary of agriculture, announced Wednesday that he was quitting after five days on the job. Norton, who gave no reason for the resignation, was not available for comment. Norton had been serving in the post since the departure of John R. Block. He holds extensive farming interests in California and Arizona and is the former head of the J. R. Norton Co.
NEWS
February 23, 2011 | By Michael A. Memoli, Washington Bureau
WASHINGTON ? In his first public comments on the Libyan crisis, President Obama said Wednesday his administration is preparing "the full range of options" to respond and condemned the government's "outrageous and unacceptable" suppression of its citizens' rights. Without offering specific details, Obama said the United States would study "accountability measures" it might take unilaterally or in cooperation with allies and multinational organizations. Obama said the actions of the Libyan government "violate international norms and every standard of common decency," and called for violence to stop immediately.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 30, 2009 | Keith Thursby
Paul "Red" Fay, who met John F. Kennedy when they were both in the Navy, joined his administration as undersecretary of the Navy and then wrote a bestselling book about their friendship, has died. He was 91. Fay, who had Alzheimer's disease, died Sept. 23 at his home in Woodside, Calif., said his son, Paul Fay III. Fay met the future president in 1942 in Rhode Island. Their first meeting, in a story befitting the Kennedy legend, was during a touch football game that Kennedy joined in progress.
OPINION
July 17, 2009 | Wendy Orent, Wendy Orent is the author of "Plague: The Mysterious Past and Terrifying Future of the World's Most Dangerous Disease."
After the anthrax letter attacks of October 2001, the Bush administration pledged $57 billion to keep the nation safe from bioterror. Since then, the government has created a vast network of laboratories and institutions to track down and block every remotely conceivable form of bioterror threat.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 14, 2008 | From the Associated Press
Ned Rifkin, the Smithsonian Institution's undersecretary for art, will leave the post in April. Rifkin, 58, who has overseen eight art museums since 2004, is the only one of the Smithsonian's top five officials who isn't serving an interim appointment. Former Secretary Lawrence Small resigned in March 2007 amid scrutiny of his spending and compensation. The Smithsonian Board of Regents is searching for a new secretary, and a decision is expected this month. Cristian Samper has been serving as acting secretary for the last year.
WORLD
August 27, 2007 | Molly Hennessy-Fiske, Times Staff Writer
washington -- A Bush political appointee and former Silicon Valley executive who has faced opposition in his bid to bail out Iraq's struggling factories is under investigation by the Defense Department on mismanagement allegations. Deputy Undersecretary of Defense Paul A. Brinkley, who heads an economic task force in Baghdad, is accused of mismanaging government money and engaging in public drunkenness and sexual harassment, a Defense Department spokesman said last week.
WORLD
May 20, 2005 | Sonni Efron, Times Staff Writer
A senior State Department official and international experts gave a Senate panel a pessimistic assessment Thursday of developments in Iran, saying they saw no signs that current disarmament efforts would deter the country's rulers from acquiring a nuclear weapon. One expert told senators that the "most probable" outcome of the stalemate would be that Tehran would obtain nuclear weapons.
NEWS
June 5, 1985 | Associated Press
President Reagan intends to nominate S. Bruce Smart Jr. to be undersecretary of commerce for international trade, the White House announced Tuesday. If confirmed by the Senate, Smart, who has been chairman and chief executive officer of the Continental Group since 1981, would succeed Lionel H. Olmer.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 14, 1998 | DARRELL SATZMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In a strong expression of support for building the next generation of military jets at Palmdale's Plant 42, California's entire congressional delegation has signed a letter asking the Department of Defense to compare production costs there with costs at any other facility. The contract to build the Joint Strike Fighter could be worth up to $750 billion over 25 years and is expected to generate thousands of new jobs in the region where it is built. The Oct.
WORLD
May 12, 2004 | Esther Schrader and Elizabeth Shogren, Times Staff Writers
The Army general who investigated abuse at a U.S. military prison in Iraq and a Pentagon official in charge of military intelligence disagreed sharply Tuesday over who controlled the prison when Iraqi war prisoners were stripped, humiliated and threatened with attack dogs. Responding to questions for the first time since his secret report to Army officials became public, Maj. Gen. Antonio M.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|