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NEWS
August 13, 1992 | RODNEY BOSCH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
As fresh fig fanciers know all too well, the harvest season is fleeting. Unable to be picked until the heat of late summer brings out its sweetness, the fragile fig, once harvested, must be consumed quickly or they will decay. Because of its short shelf-life all but a scant few markets do not attempt to carry this exotic tree-grown fruit. So where can you go to buy fresh figs?
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NEWS
June 13, 1994 | STEPHANIE SIMON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
He has a master's in business from Harvard, a bachelor's in economics from Stanford and some blunt advice for the farmers at Underwood Ranches. Liquidate. If the partners auctioned off their tractors and sold their land, they would no doubt reap a hefty sum. Enough, surely, to invest in a solid mutual fund, kick back and watch the dividends roll in. At least, that's how consultant Bill Knoke figures it.
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NEWS
June 13, 1994 | STEPHANIE SIMON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
He has a master's in business from Harvard, a bachelor's in economics from Stanford and some blunt advice for the farmers at Underwood Ranches. Liquidate. If the partners auctioned off their tractors and sold their land, they would no doubt reap a hefty sum. Enough, surely, to invest in a solid mutual fund, kick back and watch the dividends roll in. At least, that's how consultant Bill Knoke figures it.
NEWS
August 13, 1992 | RODNEY BOSCH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
As fresh fig fanciers know all too well, the harvest season is fleeting. Unable to be picked until the heat of late summer brings out its sweetness, the fragile fig, once harvested, must be consumed quickly or they will decay. Because of its short shelf-life all but a scant few markets do not attempt to carry this exotic tree-grown fruit. So where can you go to buy fresh figs?
NEWS
July 20, 1995 | RODNEY BOSCH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Sinking a knife into a melon, exposing its delicate, watery flesh, is a true summertime ritual. Watermelon. Cantaloupe. Casaba. Honeydew. Crenshaw. Tangy or sweet, seedless or otherwise, melons will soon be a strong presence at area markets. This season's melon arrival has been somewhat delayed because of cooler-than-normal temperatures in the Imperial and San Joaquin valleys, where much of the state's melon crops are raised.
NEWS
March 6, 1994 | STEPHANIE SIMON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
From the freeway, the field now looks like a vast, just-vacuumed carpet, a uniform stretch of bright, bright green. Up close, however, the beds more resemble a scruffy patchwork quilt. Nurturing three types of lettuce plus radishes and turnips, the field bristles with contrasting shapes, sizes and colors. A broad oval here, a spiky nub there. A deep green, a silver sheen.
NEWS
March 6, 1994 | STEPHANIE SIMON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The field bristles with contrasting shapes, sizes and colors. A broad oval here, a spiky nub there. A deep green, a silver sheen. Rancher Jim Roberts staggered the planting of the field in eight-acre strips, so his workers have been picking the three types of lettuce, radishes and turnips steadily throughout the winter. So far, they've harvested about half of the 60 acres dubbed Conejo Ranch.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 17, 1999 | RODNEY BOSCH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Ailing artichoke growers from the Castroville area have got to be saying to themselves "we're due," while artichoke eaters might be wondering "what happened to all the great supplies we used to see?" Over the past few seasons, calamitous weather in the state's Land of the Artichoke has decimated production levels. The spring floods of 1995 washed out prime acreage--a blow so lethal it also caused harvests to be slashed in 1996 because farmers were busy replacing their fields.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 24, 1994 | J.E. MITCHELL
County officials may require a Camarillo-area farming operation to move several compost heaps from a 60-acre farm unless the company can control the strong odor from the compost before the end of the week. Fairfield housing tract residents, whose homes are near the 300-foot-long compost piles at Conejo Ranch, have complained that the piles have created an overwhelming stench and have attracted thousands of flies. The farm is situated north of the Ventura Freeway at the base of the Conejo Grade.
NEWS
December 26, 1993 | STEPHANIE SIMON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Natividad Zavala waited impatiently for months as his bosses prepped the 60-acre field, a former swamp that stretches alongside jagged hills just north of the Ventura Freeway. Come October, the field looked ready and Zavala itched to get down to the grubby job of planting Conejo Ranch. But partners Craig Underwood, Jim Roberts and Minos Athanassiadis held off.
NEWS
June 11, 1994 | STEPHANIE SIMON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
He has a master's degree in business from Harvard, a bachelor's in economics from Stanford and some blunt advice for the farmers at Underwood Ranches. Liquidate. If the partners auctioned off their tractors and sold their land, they would no doubt reap a hefty sum. Enough, surely, to invest in a solid mutual fund, kick back and watch the dividends roll in. At least, that's how consultant Bill Knoke figures it.
NEWS
November 10, 1994 | RICHARD KAHLENBERG, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
In Somis, the roadside veggie stand operated by Underwood Ranches Inc. will be more colorful than usual this holiday season. At first glance, the stand will look like it's stocked with open sacks of semi-precious stones. On closer examination, you'll discover that you're looking at beans--a particularly planet- and people-friendly food staple.
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