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ENTERTAINMENT
January 23, 2012 | By Glenn Whipp, Special to the Los Angeles Times
"Underworld: Awakening" begins with a tidy, three-minute wrap of the series' first two movies (the third, a 2009 prequel minus star Kate Beckinsale doesn't figure into the equation) before revealing the current grim state of affairs for its clashing vampires and werewolves. Humans, at least those oblivious to the charms of the "Twilight" movies, have decided to stop killing each other and focus on eradicating creatures possessing fangs. Our vampire antiheroine Selene (Beckinsale)
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 27, 2014 | By Joe Mozingo
When Raymond "Shrimp Boy" Chow walked the streets of San Francisco's Chinatown in one of his natty suits, bright pocket square ablaze, he exuded power. Almost from the moment he arrived from Hong Kong in 1976 at the age of 16, he was a force in the local underworld, working as an enforcer for a local fraternal club called the Hop Sing Tong, shaking down gambling dens and running prostitution rings, according to authorities and his own accounts. He once told prosecutors he was in charge of all Asian crime in San Francisco, and admitted that he partnered with a leader in an ancient Chinese criminal group, or Triad.
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ENTERTAINMENT
October 4, 2012 | By Charles McNulty, Los Angeles Times Theater Critic
"Eurydice," Sarah Ruhl's playful retelling of the Orpheus myth from a female perspective, has returned from that underworld where plays go between revivals. It seems as though someone is always summoning this one up, and the current production at South Coast Repertory, while overplaying at times the work's theatrical whimsy, reveals what's so enticing about the playwright's vision. Directed by SCR artistic director Marc Masterson, this "Eurydice" is visually quite alluring. Gerard Howland's lightly surreal scenic design is beautifully lighted by Anne Militello, who finds all sorts of otherworldly hues to suggest Eurydice's descent to the land of the dead on her wedding day. The multimedia design by John Crawford tickles the unconscious with flickering background images that mix the mythic with the postmodern with as much confidence as Ruhl splices together the ancient and the modern.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 25, 2013 | By Susan King
Director Michael Campus vividly recalls the reaction to his film "The Mack" from the opening-night audience 40 years ago in Oakland. The film, starring Max Julien as the charismatic pimp Goldie and Richard Pryor as his friend Slim, had shot in the Bay Area city. "The first scene came on with Richie and Max and - I am not exaggerating - the whole audience stood up and started screaming back at the screen," Campus said. "They never sat down. No one had shown that world - no one had portrayed the black underworld.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 25, 2008 | Kevin Thomas, Special to The Times
A decade ago, writer-director Chris Chan Lee made a standout debut with "Yellow," which followed eight Korean American teens through a harrowing graduation night. The film had a quality of universality, yet it explored the painful gap between immigrant parents and their intensely American children. It won prizes and enthusiastic reviews, but without strong distribution and promotion, it did not launch Lee on the career he deserved.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 25, 2013 | By Susan King
Director Michael Campus vividly recalls the reaction to his film "The Mack" from the opening-night audience 40 years ago in Oakland. The film, starring Max Julien as the charismatic pimp Goldie and Richard Pryor as his friend Slim, had shot in the Bay Area city. "The first scene came on with Richie and Max and - I am not exaggerating - the whole audience stood up and started screaming back at the screen," Campus said. "They never sat down. No one had shown that world - no one had portrayed the black underworld.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 7, 2009 | Scott T. Sterling
"We did a string of shows a couple of years ago and started to notice that something extraordinary was happening in the U.S.," says Karl Hyde, frontman for pioneering British electronic music outfit Underworld, in regards to the resurgence of dance culture in America. He's speaking on the phone from London. "There was a real momentum kicking in. Audiences were growing, and younger people were coming out to the shows, including a magical night at the Hollywood Bowl.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 4, 2010 | By Gary Goldstein, Special to the Los Angeles Times
You've seen it all before in movies by Guy Ritchie and Quentin Tarantino and every imitator in between. And yet, taken on its own merits, the dark Irish crime comedy "Perrier's Bounty," directed by Ian FitzGibbon, proves a fast-paced and enjoyable if violent diversion that revels in its quirky characters, committed performances and involving twists. Anchored by an energetic turn by the versatile Cillian Murphy ("Red Eye," "28 Days Later") as Michael, a "perpetual waster" with a ticking clock on his debt to scary gangster Darren Perrier ( Brendan Gleeson)
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 27, 2014 | By Joe Mozingo
When Raymond "Shrimp Boy" Chow walked the streets of San Francisco's Chinatown in one of his natty suits, bright pocket square ablaze, he exuded power. Almost from the moment he arrived from Hong Kong in 1976 at the age of 16, he was a force in the local underworld, working as an enforcer for a local fraternal club called the Hop Sing Tong, shaking down gambling dens and running prostitution rings, according to authorities and his own accounts. He once told prosecutors he was in charge of all Asian crime in San Francisco, and admitted that he partnered with a leader in an ancient Chinese criminal group, or Triad.
BOOKS
April 25, 1993 | NICK TOSCHES, Tosches's book "Dino," which is being made into a movie for Warner Bros., will be published in paperback this June by Dell
Some years ago, I had the pleasure of meeting Juggy Gayles, the Moses of promotion men. In the 1930s, Juggy was a song-plugger for the likes of Irving Berlin and Sammy Cahn. "The idea," he told me, "was to get your song played on the radio. With seven plugs, seven good shots, you could make a hit song." Juggy was the man who plugged "God Bless America," the man who broke "White Christmas"--the biggest-selling record of all time. In a career that spanned half a century, he worked with Glenn Miller, Sinatra (who tried to kill himself in Juggy's apartment)
ENTERTAINMENT
October 4, 2012 | By Charles McNulty, Los Angeles Times Theater Critic
"Eurydice," Sarah Ruhl's playful retelling of the Orpheus myth from a female perspective, has returned from that underworld where plays go between revivals. It seems as though someone is always summoning this one up, and the current production at South Coast Repertory, while overplaying at times the work's theatrical whimsy, reveals what's so enticing about the playwright's vision. Directed by SCR artistic director Marc Masterson, this "Eurydice" is visually quite alluring. Gerard Howland's lightly surreal scenic design is beautifully lighted by Anne Militello, who finds all sorts of otherworldly hues to suggest Eurydice's descent to the land of the dead on her wedding day. The multimedia design by John Crawford tickles the unconscious with flickering background images that mix the mythic with the postmodern with as much confidence as Ruhl splices together the ancient and the modern.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 21, 2012 | By Matt Cooper
Click here to download TV listings for the week of Sept. 23 - 29 in PDF format This week's TV Movies   SERIES The First Family: Christopher B. Duncan, Gladys Knight, John Witherspoon, Jackée Harry and Marla Gibbs stars in this new sitcom set at 1600 Pennsylvania Ave. (5 p.m. KCAL). Mr. Box Office: Bill Bellamy plays a movie star turned inner-city high school teacher in this new comedy (5:30 p.m. KCAL). Unsealed: Alien Files: Alleged encounters with extraterrestrials are probed in this new series (11 p.m. KTLA)
ENTERTAINMENT
January 23, 2012 | By Amy Kaufman, Los Angeles Times
Audiences haven't tired of Kate Beckinsale as a butt-kicking heroine — the fourth installment of Sony Pictures' "Underworld" series debuted to healthy ticket sales over the weekend. The vampire action-thriller "Underworld: Awakening" opened to $25.4 million, according to an estimate from the studio's Screen Gems label. Meanwhile, George Lucas' "Red Tails" — about the Tuskegee Airmen — exceeded industry expectations, selling $19.1-million worth of tickets. "Haywire," Steven Soderbergh's action-thriller starring mixed martial arts star Gina Carano, had a less impressive opening of $9 million.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 23, 2012 | By Glenn Whipp, Special to the Los Angeles Times
"Underworld: Awakening" begins with a tidy, three-minute wrap of the series' first two movies (the third, a 2009 prequel minus star Kate Beckinsale doesn't figure into the equation) before revealing the current grim state of affairs for its clashing vampires and werewolves. Humans, at least those oblivious to the charms of the "Twilight" movies, have decided to stop killing each other and focus on eradicating creatures possessing fangs. Our vampire antiheroine Selene (Beckinsale)
ENTERTAINMENT
January 23, 2012
'Underworld Awakening' MPAA rating: R for strong violence and gore, and for some language Running time: 1 hour, 28 minutes Playing: In general release
BUSINESS
January 20, 2012 | By Ben Fritz, Los Angeles Times
The fourth movie in Sony Pictures' "Underworld" vampire series should lead the box office this weekend as Hollywood hopes to continue what has been a strong January in theaters. People who have seen prerelease audience surveys are confident that"Underworld: Awakening"will debut with between $20 million and $25 million. There's less certainty around another new entry,"Red Tails. " The George Lucas-produced movie about the World War II Tuskegee Airmen is tracking for an opening of around $15 million, gaining momentum recently among African American audiences.
BUSINESS
December 22, 1996
Now that Archer-Daniels-Midland has been indicted and fined, will its new slogan be "Archer Daniels Midland, Supermarket to the Underworld"? MORRIS MOSKOW Los Angeles
NEWS
March 19, 1987 | From Times Wire Services
Santo Trafficante Jr., believed to be one of the last of the old-time Mafia dons and a shadowy figure questioned in both the assassination of President John F. Kennedy and a plot on the life of Cuban leader Fidel Castro, has died at the age of 72. Henry Gonzalez of Tampa, a longtime friend and attorney, said Trafficante died late Tuesday) at the Texas Heart Institute in Houston, where he had gone for heart surgery.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 2, 2011 | By Robert Lloyd / Los Angeles Times Television Critic
"The Take," a British miniseries first broadcast in 2009 over Sky1, makes its way to these shores Friday via Encore, sister station to Starz. It adapts a 2005 novel by Martina Cole, a bestselling author in the U.K., who sets her stories in the London gangland; her books have a reputation for graphic violence and tough female characters. Every major character in "The Take," and most every minor one, is either a criminal, a retired criminal, related to a criminal or dating one, and as usual in gangster dramas they are distinguished within their shared badness by their taste, manners, self-control and capability for thought and thoughtfulness.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 29, 2011 | By Chris Barton, Los Angeles Times
When it comes to drawing up a vision of hell, there are few American writers better suited to the job than Chuck Palahniuk. No stranger to examining all manner of unsavory if potentially damning behavior in a steady stream of bitingly funny, provocative novels including "Fight Club," "Choke" and "Survivor," Palahniuk now turns his caustic eye toward the devil's proper domain with his 12th novel, "Damned. " Enlisted by Palahniuk as our guide into the underworld is Madison Spencer, an overweight, recently deceased 13-year-old girl sentenced to an eternity in hell after an apparent marijuana overdose (though, of course, there's more to her death than that)
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