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October 24, 2002 | Steve Baltin, Special to The Times
With the recent release of "A Hundred Days Off," electronic music heroes Underworld passed part one of the test on how it would fare without producer-DJ Darren Emerson, who left the group in 1999. Part two -- how the live show that has ranked right up there with the Prodigy's in the dance world would manage -- was answered emphatically Monday at the sold-out Wiltern. Now a duo, Karl Hyde and Rick Smith opened strongly with the pulsating "Mo Move," the lead track from the new album.
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NEWS
October 24, 2002 | Steve Baltin, Special to The Times
With the recent release of "A Hundred Days Off," electronic music heroes Underworld passed part one of the test on how it would fare without producer-DJ Darren Emerson, who left the group in 1999. Part two -- how the live show that has ranked right up there with the Prodigy's in the dance world would manage -- was answered emphatically Monday at the sold-out Wiltern. Now a duo, Karl Hyde and Rick Smith opened strongly with the pulsating "Mo Move," the lead track from the new album.
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NEWS
October 17, 2002 | Dean Kuipers, Times Staff Writer
Underworld, says its singer Karl Hyde, is an anti-brand. He's not interested in making sure anything sounds like Underworld. "Born Slippy," its million-selling 1996 club anthem whose irrepressible chug and droning "mega mega lager lager" mantra-like lyrics lent the film "Trainspotting" its air of post-acid house debauch, happened once, a non-album flash of genius. To work like a pop band and try to bottle that sound, he says, is to become a cartoon.
NEWS
October 17, 2002 | Dean Kuipers, Times Staff Writer
Underworld, says its singer Karl Hyde, is an anti-brand. He's not interested in making sure anything sounds like Underworld. "Born Slippy," its million-selling 1996 club anthem whose irrepressible chug and droning "mega mega lager lager" mantra-like lyrics lent the film "Trainspotting" its air of post-acid house debauch, happened once, a non-album flash of genius. To work like a pop band and try to bottle that sound, he says, is to become a cartoon.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 24, 1994 | LORRAINE ALI, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
There's a sort of twisted mysticism that surrounds techno music and the artists who hone the style. In many ways, it's a hipper take on New Age in which crystals are replaced by hallucinogens, ethnic caftans by synthetic baggywear and harmonic convergence by a spellbinding beat. The dance floor is the shrine, where the enigmatic creators behind the bass-heavy thunder, such as Messiah and Lords of Acid, seem as vaporous and untouchable as the image of the Great and Powerful Oz.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 24, 1994 | LORRAINE ALI, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
There's a sort of twisted mysticism that surrounds techno music and the artists who hone the style. In many ways, it's a hipper take on New Age in which crystals are replaced by hallucinogens, ethnic caftans by synthetic baggywear and harmonic convergence by a spellbinding beat. The dance floor is the shrine, where the enigmatic creators behind the bass-heavy thunder, such as Messiah and Lords of Acid, seem as vaporous and untouchable as the image of the Great and Powerful Oz.
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