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BUSINESS
June 3, 1998 | Dow Jones
Endocare Inc. said its temperature-based, cancer-treating Cryocare technology received safety certification from Underwriters Laboratories Inc. The Cryosurgery technology is used to treat prostate cancer and cancer of the liver. Irvine-based Endocare develops, makes and markets surgical technologies that freeze cancerous tumors.
BUSINESS
December 5, 1995 | JACK SEARLES
Eltron International Inc., a Simi Valley producer of bar-code label printers and related software and accessories, has had its products approved by the standardization organization that represents the European Community and nations worldwide. The products were registered by Underwriters Laboratories Inc. with the International Organization for Standardization.
BUSINESS
July 11, 1997 | (Dow Jones)
HomeBase warehouses said Thursday that it has removed certain floor-stand and desktop oscillating fans from its store shelves because the products didn't meet Underwriters Laboratories Inc. safety requirements. The Irvine home improvement company said that Underwriters had notified it that three models of Envirotech and Enviro-Temp fans didn't comply with standards. HomeBase, a unit of Waban Inc.
REAL ESTATE
December 10, 2006 | Gayle Pollard-Terry, Times Staff Writer
Easily preventable fires ruin holiday seasons every year because Christmas lights overload old electrical systems that have not been updated, frayed wires ignite flammable decorations or unattended lights short out. Before stringing the tree or trying to outdo the neighbors by putting thousands of lights on the house, consult a source of holiday safety tips, such as the U.S. Consumer Product Safety Commission, www.cpsc.gov, or the U.S. Fire Administration, www.usfa.dhs.gov.
NEWS
February 5, 1991
If you've shopped for a lamp lately, you know that halogen--which has been in use in Europe for years--is now hot in the United States. Like regular incandescent bulbs, halogen bulbs have a tungsten filament. But halogen bulbs also include a halogen gas, which triples the life of the bulb. Because halogen bulbs get hotter than incandescent bulbs, they are potentially a greater fire hazard, says a spokeswoman for Underwriters Laboratories Inc., an independent testing laboratory.
NEWS
December 23, 1994 | From Associated Press
Freak weather set off oversensitive carbon monoxide detectors across the city on Thursday, deluging firefighters with more than 1,800 emergency calls from worried residents. The detectors, required in city residences since Oct. 1, let out their high-pitched beeps late Wednesday and early Thursday, apparently because of an unusually high level of carbon monoxide in the air, officials said.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 30, 1987 | RAY PEREZ, Times Staff Writer
County and state investigators Wednesday had not determined the cause of death of a 24-year-old man who collapsed Monday while shampooing a carpet in Mission Viejo. Deputy Coroner William King said that Luke Gregory might have died of electrocution but that it will be days, if not weeks, before a ruling is made. Gregory, an employee of Dial One California Cleaning Technicians in Laguna Hills, died while shampooing a rug at a home in the 25900 block of Robin Circle in Mission Viejo.
BUSINESS
June 22, 1991 | KAREN TUMULTY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
U.S. and European officials took a step forward Friday in their efforts to harmonize the dizzying array of product regulations, standards and testing procedures that manufacturers face as they attempt to market their products globally. After their third meeting in two years, U.S.
BUSINESS
August 3, 2011 | By Tiffany Hsu, Los Angeles Times
They can look benign from a distance — solar panels glistening in the sun or turbines gently churning with the breeze to produce electricity for hundreds of thousands of homes. But building and maintaining them can be hazardous. Accidents involving wind turbines alone have tripled in the last decade, and watchdog groups fear incidents could skyrocket further — placing more workers and even bystanders in harm's way — because a surge in projects requires hiring hordes of new and often inexperienced workers.
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