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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 9, 2014 | By Patrick McGreevy
SACRAMENTO -- Administrators from California's two public university systems called Wednesday for the state to provide student loans to some immigrants in the country illegally to cover expenses not met with state scholarships. UC President Janet Napolitano and Sacramento State President Alexander Gonzalez said their  university systems are backing legislation creating the loan program, which will cost the state and campuses up to $9.1 million the first year. Napolitano noted that the state previously granted students in the country illegally access to state scholarships and the in-state residence rate.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 9, 2014 | By Patrick McGreevy
SACRAMENTO -- Administrators from California's two public university systems called Wednesday for the state to provide student loans to some immigrants in the country illegally to cover expenses not met with state scholarships. UC President Janet Napolitano and Sacramento State President Alexander Gonzalez said their  university systems are backing legislation creating the loan program, which will cost the state and campuses up to $9.1 million the first year. Napolitano noted that the state previously granted students in the country illegally access to state scholarships and the in-state residence rate.
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NATIONAL
May 15, 2011 | By Julie Mianecki, Washington Bureau
Anngie Gutierrez was a child when she arrived in the United States as an illegal immigrant 10 years ago. There's still no path to legal status for her, but in Maryland and a handful of other states, there is a more affordable road to college. Gutierrez, a high school junior in Hyattsville, Md., will benefit from a new state law that allows illegal immigrants who reside there to pay in-state tuition rates at Maryland's public colleges. If she lived in Virginia, about 15 miles to the west, she would find that many public colleges require undocumented students to pay out-of-state tuition.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 18, 2013 | By Larry Gordon
SAN FRANCISCO -- The UC regents on Thursday confirmed U.S. Secretary of Homeland Security Janet Napolitano as the next president of the 10-campus system during a sometimes rowdy meeting marked by a protest from students and others who contend Napolitano expanded deportations of undocumented immigrants. The regents set Naplitano's salary at $570,000 a year, which is $21,000 less than the pay for current UC president Mark G. Yudof and avoids a political furor about executive pay inflation.
NEWS
December 21, 2002 | Theodore R. Mitchell, Theodore R. Mitchell is president of Occidental College.
Monday's decision by the University of California and the California State University to raise student fees has placed a harsh new spotlight on college affordability. Lost in the debate over access are thousands of high-achieving students in California who find they are unable to afford college because they were brought into this country illegally as children -- and hence are ineligible for state and federal financial aid.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 12, 1992
Pete Tafoya, President, Board of Trustees, Ventura County Community College District Let me approach the answer from the position of the court case, "Leticia A," in which a Superior Court judge ruled in favor of lower fees for undocumented Cal State University students. For those residents who are either in the transition of becoming a citizen or for whatever reasons haven't become a citizen, I am in favor of that. "Leticia A." pointed out that there are many, many residents of California who have, for whatever reasons, not sought citizenship.
OPINION
August 19, 2011 | By Elena T. Reigadas
It happened again this semester. A student came to my office and asked me to close the door. After going through this drill so many times before, I knew what would come next. In a process akin to "coming out of the closet," these students reveal to me their terrible secret: They are undocumented immigrants. I am a community college professor. In addition to teaching, my role includes mentoring students, helping them achieve their academic and career goals, and identifying the brightest ones to become role models, tutors and peer mentors.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 21, 2010 | By Patrick J. McDonnell, Los Angeles Times
They were both working-class girls from Southern California immigrant families. One was of Vietnamese heritage, the other Mexican. One was reserved, the other vivacious. Both surmounted hardships to graduate from UCLA and be admitted to prestigious East Coast universities for graduate studies. And both shared a particular passion: a commitment to assist undocumented students like themselves attend college, attain legal status and escape the shadow existence of illegal immigrants.
OPINION
May 27, 2008 | Matias Ramos, Matias Ramos, a political science student at UCLA, is a contributor to the book "Underground Undergrads: UCLA Undocumented Immigrant Students Speak Out."
During the last four years, UC students have endured two rounds of budget crises, fee increases and a scandal over little-known, lucrative UC executive compensation deals. But one issue that flies under the radar and affects the relationship between the university and our vast immigrant population is the ongoing controversy over equal access for undocumented immigrant students. Caught in the middle of a nationally polarized debate on immigration, a growing number of highly capable students are being left out of the UC's equation because of the inability of Congress to enact comprehensive immigration reform.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 27, 2011 | By Teresa Watanabe, Los Angeles Times
A day after Gov. Jerry Brown signed a law giving thousands of illegal immigrant college students access to private scholarship funds, immigrant advocates said they are aiming for a far bigger prize: California public grants. "It was a good step forward, but the glass is still half-empty," said Ivan Ceja, 19, a Fullerton community college student who was illegally brought to the U.S. from Mexico as a baby. At a Los Angeles town hall gathering Monday, Brown signed into law AB 130, which will allow undocumented students who qualify for reduced in-state tuition to apply for $88 million in private scholarship funds administered by the University of California, Cal State University and the California Community Colleges.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 12, 2013 | By Cindy Chang
Seth Ronquillo is a fourth-year film and linguistics major at UCLA. He is co-chair of IDEAs, a group for students in the country illegally. Like many immigrant rights activists, he holds Janet Napolitano responsible for the increasing number of deportations during her tenure as Department of Homeland Security secretary. He calls her nomination to be head of the UC system "frustrating" and "scary. " "It shouldn't intimidate us. It should be a source of strength," Ronquillo said.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 12, 2012 | By Larry Gordon and Cindy Chang, Los Angeles Times
UC Berkeley announced a $1-million grant Tuesday to boost financial aid for undocumented students, which is thought to be the largest gift of its kind in the nation. The donation from the Evelyn and Walter Haas Jr. Fund will supplement state aid for undocumented students that is scheduled to roll out over the next two semesters in a policy change authorized by the California Dream Act. Undocumented students will be eligible for state aid but not for federal grants or loans, and the donation - along with other private funds - will help fill in the gaps, officials said.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 11, 2012 | By Paloma Esquivel, Los Angeles Times
When Sergio C. Garcia was sworn in as a lawyer at a courthouse in Chico late last year, hundreds showed up. A local restaurant gave out food and a Spanish radio station covered the event. In this community bounded by orchards and fields, Garcia's success was unique, and cherished. His parents had brought him to the United States illegally when he was 17 months old. They toiled as farmworkers and constantly encouraged their children to go to school. As an adult, Garcia worked full time at a grocery store while attending college.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 7, 2012 | By Paloma Esquivel, Los Angeles Times
A group of Silicon Valley technology leaders is working to help undocumented students attend college, prepare for jobs and, when possible, find ways to legalize their status. The group, described by Palm Pilot inventor Jeff Hawkins as a loose coalition, is looking to provide assistance and guidance to students in the absence of legislation such as the Dream Act, which would create a path to citizenship for young illegal immigrants who are college students and military service members.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 19, 2011 | By Larry Gordon, Los Angeles Times
Many Californians worry that they are being priced out of the state's public university systems, and they object to allowing illegal immigrants the same financial aid that U.S. citizens can receive at the campuses, a new poll has found. Fifty-five percent of the voters questioned said they oppose a new state law known as the California DREAM Act. It will permit undocumented students who graduated from California high schools and meet other requirements to receive taxpayer aid to attend the University of California, Cal State and community colleges starting in 2013.
OPINION
October 16, 2011
Alabama's Legislature has made children the chief victims of the nation's harshest anti-immigrant law. With its requirement that school officials determine the immigration status of children when they enroll — and with anecdotal reports that students are being grilled by teachers and administrators on the subject — it's small wonder that the absentee rate among Latino children has reportedly skyrocketed. This wrongheaded requirement is part of a law that went into effect this month and that has done little but produce fear and confusion among Alabama's undocumented residents, many of whom are Latino.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 11, 2012 | By Paloma Esquivel, Los Angeles Times
When Sergio C. Garcia was sworn in as a lawyer at a courthouse in Chico late last year, hundreds showed up. A local restaurant gave out food and a Spanish radio station covered the event. In this community bounded by orchards and fields, Garcia's success was unique, and cherished. His parents had brought him to the United States illegally when he was 17 months old. They toiled as farmworkers and constantly encouraged their children to go to school. As an adult, Garcia worked full time at a grocery store while attending college.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 25, 2011 | By Teresa Watanabe, Los Angeles Times
Sacramento native Shawn Lewis knows the value of student financial aid. The son of a struggling single mom, Lewis says he never would have been able to attend UC Berkeley without the $24,000 in annual state grants and private scholarships he receives to pursue his political science degree and dreams of law school. But Gov. Jerry Brown is now considering whether to sign landmark legislation that would extend state financial aid to illegal immigrants who are college students. And that makes Lewis anxious.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 1, 2011 | By Teresa Watanabe and Patrick McGreevy,Los Angeles Times
The college dreams of thousands of students who are illegal immigrants moved closer to fulfillment Wednesday after the state Senate approved a bill that for the first time would give them access to public financial aid. Part of a two-bill package known as the California Dream Act, the measure would allow undocumented students who qualify for reduced in-state tuition to apply for Cal Grants, community college waivers and other public aid programs....
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