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NEWS
April 4, 2013 | By Ted Rall
Farmers claim they need to hire undocumented workers under the H-2A visa program because they can't find enough American applicants. Indeed, few Americans apply and those who do, don't work out. Why? ALSO: The new reality at the border Photo gallery: Ted Rall cartoons Goldberg: Is disability the new welfare? Follow Ted Rall on Twitter @TedRall  
ARTICLES BY DATE
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 1, 2013 | By Marisa Gerber
A shout echoed out of Plaza Olvera after dawn Wednesday. A janitor whose small frame belied her booming voice stood at the center of a circle of people, leading the chant: "Obama, escucha: Estamos en la lucha. " The 40 or so others -- a fraction of those expected to show up at a May Day march later in the day -- echoed her cry, which more or less translates to "Listen up, Obama: We are in the fight. " For the small but boisterous group of activists who gathered Wednesday morning, May Day is as much a plea for immigration change as a day to celebrate laborers.
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OPINION
June 24, 2011 | By Harold Meyerson
Nearly every day for three years, Josue Melquisedec Diaz reported to work by going to a New Orleans street corner where contractors, subcontractors and people fixing up their places went to hire day laborers. It was there, one day in 2008, that a contractor picked him up and took him to Beaumont, Texas, just across the Louisiana line, to work on the cleanup, demolition and reconstruction projects that Beaumont was undertaking in the wake of Hurricane Gustav. Diaz was put to work in a residential neighborhood that had been flooded.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 1, 2013 | By Reed Johnson
Poets have been called the "unacknowledged legislators of the world. " (A poet, naturally, coined the phrase.) On Wednesday, a cross-section of L.A. musical street poets and activists -- including members of the bands Ozomatli, Quetzal, La Santa Cecilia, Las Cafeteras and La Chamba -- will be taking part in the May Day International Workers Day and Immigration Reform March in downtown Los Angeles. As they explained at a Tuesday morning press conference, they're urging others to march with them, and they hope to inspire legislators in Washington, D.C., to get busy enacting comprehensive immigration reform and extending human rights protections to migrant workers.
NEWS
May 5, 2002
Re "Mexico Offers Theft-Proof Version of IDs," April 17: I am opposed to giving undocumented workers driver's licenses. We need to stop accommodating these people. They are breaking the law and are not deserving of extra help. I also want to respond to your article about welfare moms. The woman you used in the article was a good example of a typical situation. I have a large amount of sympathy for her four children, but little for her. She, like many in her situation, needs to stop having kids.
OPINION
April 1, 2002
Re "Davis: Let Migrants Drive," March 28: Three points. Gov. Gray Davis has again found a way to straddle an issue. Doesn't he believe in anything strongly enough to take a firm position one way or the other? Next, why are these illegal immigrants going to work in California anyway? The point is that they have no legal right to work in this country. Why in the world would we grant them a driver's license to go to jobs they shouldn't have? Finally, could The Times please stop calling these people "migrants"?
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 29, 1997 | From City News Service
Two undocumented workers found at construction sites in Irvine and Coto de Caza awaited deportation hearings Friday, while 33 others opted to return to Mexico, an INS spokesman said. Rico Cabrera, a spokesman for the Immigration and Naturalization Service, said the 35 workers were apprehended Tuesday at construction sites and were working for various contractors or subcontractors. INS agents focused on two firms, Canyon Concrete Construction Inc.
NEWS
April 4, 2013 | By Ted Rall
Farmers claim they need to hire undocumented workers under the H-2A visa program because they can't find enough American applicants. Indeed, few Americans apply and those who do, don't work out. Why? ALSO: The new reality at the border Photo gallery: Ted Rall cartoons Goldberg: Is disability the new welfare? Follow Ted Rall on Twitter @TedRall  
OPINION
May 31, 2012
Re "Bid for guest worker plan hits familiar barrier: politics," Column, May 27 Steve Lopez cites some of the many reasons for the complicated and byzantine issues involving the supply of undocumented labor and immigration policy: Native-born residents are still virtually impossible to recruit; exploitative low wages and cruel working environments; and fears of crop losses. One variable I have yet to read about is consumers' demand for cheap groceries, regardless of the cost of growing and producing.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 27, 2012 | Steve Lopez
DELANO, Calif. - "You'd think agriculture would have Republican politicians on our side, but on this issue we don't," Kevin Andrew was saying as we toured some grape fields north of Bakersfield, where farmworkers were thinning vines. Come harvest time, far more workers will be needed. And here's the problem, as Andrew sees it: There could be a looming labor shortage related to tight border security and other factors, including an improved Mexican economy. But GOP congressional reps, in particular, remain opposed to temporary legalized status and coming-and-going privileges for undocumented farmworkers.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 23, 2011 | By Tony Perry, Los Angeles Times
The owner and the manager of a French restaurant in San Diego were sentenced in federal court Thursday to serve probation and pay fines after pleading guilty to knowingly hiring undocumented immigrants. Michel Malecot, 59, the owner of French Gourmet, was sentenced to five years of probation and ordered to pay $396,575 in fines, authorities said. Richard Kauffmann, 59, the manager, was sentenced to three years of probation and ordered to pay $2,500 for his role in hiring the undocumented immigrants to work in the restaurant's bakery and catering businesses.
OPINION
June 24, 2011 | By Harold Meyerson
Nearly every day for three years, Josue Melquisedec Diaz reported to work by going to a New Orleans street corner where contractors, subcontractors and people fixing up their places went to hire day laborers. It was there, one day in 2008, that a contractor picked him up and took him to Beaumont, Texas, just across the Louisiana line, to work on the cleanup, demolition and reconstruction projects that Beaumont was undertaking in the wake of Hurricane Gustav. Diaz was put to work in a residential neighborhood that had been flooded.
OPINION
October 11, 2010 | Gregory Rodriguez
If Meg Whitman loses the gubernatorial race because her actions didn't jive with her words on illegal immigration, she could become a sacrificial lamb for the rest of us. Her sin is our sin. Because where illegal immigration is concerned, we are all hypocrites. At the second gubernatorial debate held in Fresno two weekends ago, Democratic nominee Jerry Brown had a field day with Whitman's less than elegant response to the revelation that she had employed a maid, Nicandra Diaz Santillan, who was an illegal immigrant.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 30, 2010 | By Reed Johnson, Los Angeles Times
Dying of thirst and stripped to their underwear, the headstrong Latina and the immigrant-bashing talk-radio host are staggering together through the northern Mexican desert. How they got there is a story of karmic comeuppance involving a brutal kidnapping, a vicious hate crime, a romantic betrayal and the unappeased ghosts of guilt and shame that haunt both characters. Like trails in a dusty landscape, those narrative lines converge in Josefina Lopez's two-act satirical drama "Detained in the Desert," which opens Friday at the tiny Casa 0101 theater in Boyle Heights.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 25, 2010 | By Richard Marosi and Anna Gorman, Los Angeles Times
In this palm-lined seaside neighborhood, Michel Malecot is known for dishing out the tasty baguettes, pastries and wedding cakes that have made his French Gourmet restaurant a fixture for 31 years. But when federal authorities raided his eatery, they discovered that his recipe for success included a staff of illegal immigrant workers from Mexico — pastry chefs, bakers and cake decorators, some of whom had worked the ovens for 15 years. The chef, popular in San Diego catering and philanthropic circles, was indicted last month on 12 felony counts of knowingly hiring illegal immigrants.
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