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Undocumented

CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 9, 2012 | By Patrick McGreevy, Los Angeles Times
SACRAMENTO - A difference of opinion among immigrant-rights groups appears to have contributed to the demise of legislation to provide a haven in California for people who came to the country illegally but have otherwise obeyed the law. Senate President Pro Tem Darrell Steinberg (D-Sacramento) and Assemblyman Felipe Fuentes (D-Sylmar) introduced a bill that would have given sanctuary to many immigrants who came to California illegally before 2008. It was supported by the Central American Resource Center, Hermandad Mexicana and other organizations but never received a final vote as the Legislature ended its session Aug. 31. The bill ran aground on objections from the Mexican American Legal Defense and Educational Fund, which disliked a provision requiring undocumented immigrants to register with the state Department of Justice, officials said.
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OPINION
August 21, 2012
Los Angeles County Sheriff Lee Baca has waged a long, misguided effort to withhold information about his department's cooperation with immigration officials and the demographics of his jails. His justification for refusing to release the material in response to a request under the California Public Records Act comes down to this: A federal contract preempts any state law requiring disclosure. He's wrong. The sheriff should hand over the data. Baca entered into an agreement with the Department of Homeland Security to check on the immigration status of jail inmates.
OPINION
August 17, 2012
For years, New Jersey barred U.S.-born college students from receiving state financial aid if their parents were in this country illegally. Last week, a state court of appeals put an end to that misguided policy, finding that education officials had wrongly denied aid to an 18-year-old student born and raised in the United States because her Guatemalan mother is an undocumented immigrant. Though it is binding only in New Jersey, the ruling should serve as a warning to other states - such as Florida, where U.S.-born residents are required to pay out-of-state college tuition simply because their parents are undocumented.
NEWS
August 11, 2012 | By Sandra Hernandez
The anger over President Barack Obama's policy granting young undocumented immigrants temporary permission to stay in the U.S. shows no signs of subsiding.  Republicans in Congress, including Rep. Lamar Smith (R-Texas), have accused the administration of granting a backdoor amnesty to the young immigrants who qualify. Now those same critics are accusing the president of forcing taxpayers to pay for the program. Under the policy, known as deferred action, immigrants who came to the U.S. before they were 16, have lived here for at least five years, have no criminal history, are 31 or younger and meet certain educational requirements can apply for temporary work permits and identification.  Homeland Security officials will begin accepting applications next week.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 22, 2012 | Hector Tobar
Los Angeles Times People like Ana Venegas are said to be living "in the shadows. " It's the most annoying of all the metaphors in the immigration debate. And woefully inaccurate. Venegas, 23, entered this country illegally as a 10-month-old baby carried across the Mexico-U.S. border by her teenage mother. She's never been able to legalize her status. That makes her "undocumented," if you're someone sympathetic to her plight. And an "illegal" if you're not. But whatever you want to call her, the one thing you can't say about Ana is that she's been hiding.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 20, 2012 | By Paloma Esquivel, Los Angeles Times
Immigrant rights advocates barely had time to digest the Obama administration's announcement last week that it would stop deporting some young immigrants when the questions started flowing in: Am I the right age? Does an arrest disqualify me? Do my parents qualify? "We've been celebrating all weekend," Los Angeles Mayor Antonio Villaraigosa said Tuesday. "We've now got to get ready. We've got to prepare the documents. " The mayor joined activists and student organizers at a news conference called to highlight the need for young immigrants to begin documenting their history in the United States.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 19, 2012 | By Maura Dolan, Los Angeles Times
An undocumented immigrant should be licensed to practice law even though his ability to work will be restricted, the state bar told the California Supreme Court on Monday. The agency said Sergio C. Garcia, 35, had met all the requirements to become a lawyer and could work without pay or as an independent contractor if licensed. The granting of a law license does not confer a right to employment, the State Bar of California argued, and Garcia would be expected to act legally. "While a license to practice law is necessary to obtain employment as an attorney, having a law license does not mean that the holder may be employed," attorneys for the bar said in a written filing.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 11, 2012 | By Paloma Esquivel, Los Angeles Times
When Sergio C. Garcia was sworn in as a lawyer at a courthouse in Chico late last year, hundreds showed up. A local restaurant gave out food and a Spanish radio station covered the event. In this community bounded by orchards and fields, Garcia's success was unique, and cherished. His parents had brought him to the United States illegally when he was 17 months old. They toiled as farmworkers and constantly encouraged their children to go to school. As an adult, Garcia worked full time at a grocery store while attending college.
NEWS
April 25, 2012 | By Ian Duncan
WASHINGTON -- Imitating the biblical battle of Jericho, a small group marched around the United States Supreme Court to protest Arizona's restrictive immigration law, which was being debated inside. With a clutch of white-robed clergy at their head, the 75 marchers moved in silence around the court building, their arrival at each corner announced by blasts from a trumpet. Organizers had hoped for a bigger crowd, but they said busloads of activists were held up in traffic. Before the march the protesters gathered in silent prayer, their hands raised, while the lyrics of a country song played by supporters of the law, a group of 16 of who were also rallying at the front of the court, wafted over.
OPINION
April 9, 2012
California has so far managed to avoid the mistake made by Alabama, Arizona and other states that have sought to enact local immigration laws even though that is an area that is rightly the responsibility of the federal government. But that may soon change. A bipartisan effort led by Assemblyman Felipe Fuentes (D-Sylmar) and Mike Madrid, a former political director of the state Republican Party, hopes to place the California Opportunity and Prosperity Act, or COPA, on the November ballot.
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