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Unemployment Argentina

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NEWS
July 30, 1994 | TRACY WILKINSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Argentines like to describe their life experiences in extremes. They live through the best and the worst, often at the same time. Such seemed to be the case this week: As the country enjoys brisk economic growth, unemployment has soared to its highest level since President Carlos Saul Menem took office in 1989. "This is not good news," Juan Llach, a senior official with the Argentine Economy Ministry, said as he announced unemployment figures that showed 10.
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NEWS
July 30, 1994 | TRACY WILKINSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Argentines like to describe their life experiences in extremes. They live through the best and the worst, often at the same time. Such seemed to be the case this week: As the country enjoys brisk economic growth, unemployment has soared to its highest level since President Carlos Saul Menem took office in 1989. "This is not good news," Juan Llach, a senior official with the Argentine Economy Ministry, said as he announced unemployment figures that showed 10.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 15, 2001
We differ strongly with Mark Weisbrot's characterization of Argentina's latest loan agreement with the International Monetary Fund as "helping Argentina dig itself into a deeper hole" (" 'Helpers' Such as IMF Make a Junkie of Argentina," Commentary, Sept. 5). It is his prescription of default and devaluation that would see Argentina digging itself deeper. Yes, there are risks in the new program, but Argentina's recipe for reform is the right one, well deserving of strong international support.
WORLD
November 19, 2002 | Hector Tobar, Times Staff Writer
Most people avert their eyes when the Ghost Train rattles past. Probably they wish they hadn't seen it. Or maybe they want to believe it doesn't exist. After all, it has no official timetable, no windowpanes, no doors in the frames and no seats. But the train is undeniably there. Its passengers are trash scavengers who travel every day from this down-on-its-luck northwestern suburb to a city still known, occasionally, as "the Paris of Latin America."
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