Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsUnemployment France
IN THE NEWS

Unemployment France

FEATURED ARTICLES
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
January 12, 2000 | JOHN-THOR DAHLBURG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In the latest instance of employer discontent over France's controversial 35-hour workweek, trucking companies used their rigs to block highways, tunnels and toll plazas at the country's borders Tuesday, immobilizing foreign trucks by the thousands and backing up traffic for miles. Seventy roadblocks were set up near the frontiers with Spain, Italy, Germany, Luxembourg and Switzerland as the protest wore into its second disruptive day.
Advertisement
BUSINESS
November 3, 1994 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Unemployment Rate Rises in France: The seasonally adjusted rate rose to 12.7% in September from 12.6% in August. Despite the rise, the government said it will meet its goal of stabilizing unemployment by the end of this year and significantly reducing the rate in 1995.
NEWS
January 2, 1998 | JOHN-THOR DAHLBURG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
For thousands of French men and women, there is little realistic hope of working again. And over the holiday season, while most of the rest of the country was feasting and exchanging presents, their patience ran out. From Arras in the north to Marseilles on the Mediterranean, groups of jobless protesters have been occupying offices of the government employment agency.
NEWS
January 12, 2000 | JOHN-THOR DAHLBURG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In the latest instance of employer discontent over France's controversial 35-hour workweek, trucking companies used their rigs to block highways, tunnels and toll plazas at the country's borders Tuesday, immobilizing foreign trucks by the thousands and backing up traffic for miles. Seventy roadblocks were set up near the frontiers with Spain, Italy, Germany, Luxembourg and Switzerland as the protest wore into its second disruptive day.
BUSINESS
February 9, 1996 | TYLER MARSHALL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Although seen more as a brief pause in growth than the onset of recession, an unexpected slowdown in Western Europe's bellwether economies has become the stuff of front-page headlines, heated debate and dire projections. In Germany, the government announced Thursday that the ranks of unemployed had soared past 4 million, the most since World War II. In France, the government announced tax breaks and the central bank slashed interest rates to a 25-year low in a bid to generate jobs.
NEWS
January 2, 1998 | JOHN-THOR DAHLBURG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
For thousands of French men and women, there is little realistic hope of working again. And over the holiday season, while most of the rest of the country was feasting and exchanging presents, their patience ran out. From Arras in the north to Marseilles on the Mediterranean, groups of jobless protesters have been occupying offices of the government employment agency.
TRAVEL
September 7, 2003
John HUNADAY'S rant about the disappearing American vacation ["American Workers Deserve a Vacation," Letters, Aug. 24] is nothing but rabid anti-Americanism, short on reason, facts and judgment. According to him, American workers are "cowards" and "stupid" in comparison to our European counterparts because we forgo earned vacation time when we feel that taking it would threaten our job security. It would seem obvious that the really smart and brave thing to do would be to find a job you enjoy doing so that giving up some vacation time to keep [the job]
NEWS
March 23, 1992 | RONE TEMPEST, TIMES STAFF WRITER
French voters handed the Socialist Party of President Francois Mitterrand its worst ballot score in 20 years during nationwide regional elections marked by significant gains by France's extreme right-wing National Front party and two environmental parties. In a nationally spotlighted election here in this important French Riviera capital, National Front leader Jean-Marie Le Pen won approximately 28% of the vote, highest ever for the leader of Europe's most potent far-right movement.
OPINION
March 24, 2005 | Timothy Garton Ash, Timothy Garton Ash, author most recently of "Free World: America, Europe and the Surprising Future of the West" (Random House, 2004), is professor of European studies at Oxford University and a Hoover Institution senior fellow.
Good news: It looks as though the European Union will postpone lifting its embargo on arms exports to China, at least until next year. This is the right move. The only thing wrong is that it took heavy U.S. pressure to make it happen. Consider. Europeans claim moral superiority over George W. Bush's America on the grounds that we always favor the peaceful resolution of conflicts and respect for human rights.
BUSINESS
February 9, 1996 | TYLER MARSHALL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Although seen more as a brief pause in growth than the onset of recession, an unexpected slowdown in Western Europe's bellwether economies has become the stuff of front-page headlines, heated debate and dire projections. In Germany, the government announced Thursday that the ranks of unemployed had soared past 4 million, the most since World War II. In France, the government announced tax breaks and the central bank slashed interest rates to a 25-year low in a bid to generate jobs.
BUSINESS
November 3, 1994 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Unemployment Rate Rises in France: The seasonally adjusted rate rose to 12.7% in September from 12.6% in August. Despite the rise, the government said it will meet its goal of stabilizing unemployment by the end of this year and significantly reducing the rate in 1995.
OPINION
May 15, 1988 | William Schneider, William Schneider is a contributing editor to Opinion
There were no great issue differences between the two contenders. The candidate of the left, Francois Mitterrand, stood for stability in foreign affairs and the economic status quo. The candidate of the right, Jacques Chirac, stood for the status quo in foreign affairs and economic stability. This month's French election was a bit of a bore. It could hardly have been otherwise: Mitterrand, the incumbent President, was seeking re-election to a second seven-year term.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|