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Unemployment Germany

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BUSINESS
August 4, 1998 | From Reuters
Germany's jobless are demanding more vacation time. A lobby group for the unemployed said Monday that it will press demands for six weeks of vacation pay each year--the same as Germans with jobs--at a series of nationwide rallies on Thursday. "The unemployed are only allowed to be unreachable for three weeks each year," Arbeitskreis Arbeitslos (Working Group for the Unemployed) said in a statement. "There is no such thing as holiday for those without a job."
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BUSINESS
August 4, 1998 | From Reuters
Germany's jobless are demanding more vacation time. A lobby group for the unemployed said Monday that it will press demands for six weeks of vacation pay each year--the same as Germans with jobs--at a series of nationwide rallies on Thursday. "The unemployed are only allowed to be unreachable for three weeks each year," Arbeitskreis Arbeitslos (Working Group for the Unemployed) said in a statement. "There is no such thing as holiday for those without a job."
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BUSINESS
February 12, 1997 | MARY WILLIAMS WALSH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It wasn't so long ago that German Chancellor Helmut Kohl was ringing in an "Alliance for Jobs," with bold predictions that he could cut unemployment in half by 2000 and reduce the crushing cost of German labor. Business people cheered. How things change. Now Kohl's Alliance for Jobs is all but forgotten. Unemployment is surging from one postwar record to another, month to month.
BUSINESS
July 8, 1998 | From Bloomberg News
Germany's jobless rate fell to a 19-month low of 11% in June and industrial output grew in May, reports showed Tuesday, signaling growth is accelerating in Europe's biggest economy Unemployment fell by 49,000 to 4.27 million in June, the Federal Labor Office said. That's down from 4.32 million, an 11.2% rate, in May, and the sixth straight drop this year. The Economics Ministry said production rose 0.9% in May and 5.3% in the year.
NEWS
March 9, 1994 | MARJORIE MILLER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
German unemployment rose to a postwar record of 4.04 million in February, climbing toward the jobless levels that helped bring Nazi dictator Adolf Hitler to power in 1933. The Federal Labor Office announcement Tuesday of a 10.5% jobless rate bodes poorly for Chancellor Helmut Kohl and his center-right Christian Democratic Union in this year of 19 state and federal elections. The country will vote for a new Parliament and chancellor in October.
BUSINESS
February 6, 1992 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Eastern Germany's Joblessness Jumps 17%: Joblessness in the former East Germany soared last month by 300,000 as more people were thrown out of work by the region's shattered economy. Meanwhile, unemployment in the former West Germany rose to 7% from 6.5%. The sharp rise in east German joblessness was attributed to the expiration of government job subsidies.
NEWS
April 12, 1997 | MARY WILLIAMS WALSH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The days have taken on a numbing sameness for Reinhard Dilsner, 47, a barrel-chested German construction worker: Get up. Buy the paper. Check out the want ads. Swing by the government unemployment office. Pick up printouts of the latest vacancies. Go home. Start working the phone. And every day come the same discouraging answers. "Either they say I'm too old, or too big to run this or that type of machinery, or I'm overqualified," he says. "I can't get a job."
BUSINESS
February 7, 1997 | Times Staff and Wire Reports
Germany's unemployment rate climbed to a postwar high of 12.2% in January, the government said, prompting politicians, employers and unions to call for urgent solutions to revive the country's faltering economy. December unemployment had been 10.8%. Leaders of the main opposition Social Democratic Party for the first time called for early elections, before the fall of 1998, blaming Chancellor Helmut Kohl's policies for the growing crisis.
BUSINESS
March 7, 1996 | From Associated Press
Amid fears that Germany may be heading for its second recession in three years, the government announced Wednesday that joblessness had surged past 11%, hitting a postwar record for the second consecutive month. A total of 4.27 million people--the highest number since World War II--were without jobs in February, the Federal Labor Office said. Unemployment rose to 11.1% from 10.8% in January.
BUSINESS
February 9, 1994 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
The January figure marks a postwar record and approaches the dramatic levels last seen during the Weimar Republic that ushered in Nazi dictatorship. The Federal Labor Office said the unadjusted total was 4.03 million people unemployed, up from 3.69 million in December. German politicians and commentators in recent weeks have been drawing increasingly frequent parallels to the 5-million level of the 1930s that helped bring Adolf Hitler to power.
NEWS
April 12, 1997 | MARY WILLIAMS WALSH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The days have taken on a numbing sameness for Reinhard Dilsner, 47, a barrel-chested German construction worker: Get up. Buy the paper. Check out the want ads. Swing by the government unemployment office. Pick up printouts of the latest vacancies. Go home. Start working the phone. And every day come the same discouraging answers. "Either they say I'm too old, or too big to run this or that type of machinery, or I'm overqualified," he says. "I can't get a job."
BUSINESS
February 12, 1997 | MARY WILLIAMS WALSH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It wasn't so long ago that German Chancellor Helmut Kohl was ringing in an "Alliance for Jobs," with bold predictions that he could cut unemployment in half by 2000 and reduce the crushing cost of German labor. Business people cheered. How things change. Now Kohl's Alliance for Jobs is all but forgotten. Unemployment is surging from one postwar record to another, month to month.
BUSINESS
February 7, 1997 | Times Staff and Wire Reports
Germany's unemployment rate climbed to a postwar high of 12.2% in January, the government said, prompting politicians, employers and unions to call for urgent solutions to revive the country's faltering economy. December unemployment had been 10.8%. Leaders of the main opposition Social Democratic Party for the first time called for early elections, before the fall of 1998, blaming Chancellor Helmut Kohl's policies for the growing crisis.
BUSINESS
March 7, 1996 | From Associated Press
Amid fears that Germany may be heading for its second recession in three years, the government announced Wednesday that joblessness had surged past 11%, hitting a postwar record for the second consecutive month. A total of 4.27 million people--the highest number since World War II--were without jobs in February, the Federal Labor Office said. Unemployment rose to 11.1% from 10.8% in January.
BUSINESS
February 9, 1996 | TYLER MARSHALL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Although seen more as a brief pause in growth than the onset of recession, an unexpected slowdown in Western Europe's bellwether economies has become the stuff of front-page headlines, heated debate and dire projections. In Germany, the government announced Thursday that the ranks of unemployed had soared past 4 million, the most since World War II. In France, the government announced tax breaks and the central bank slashed interest rates to a 25-year low in a bid to generate jobs.
BUSINESS
July 7, 1994 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
German Unemployment Down, Marking Recession's End: Unemployment in eastern and western Germany fell in June, reflecting the end of the country's recession, the Federal Labor Office said. The unemployment rate, which is based on unadjusted data, slipped in the west to 8.0% from 8.1% in May. The eastern German jobless rate in June was 14.8% compared with 15.4% the previous month because of increased demand for labor, said Labor Office Vice President Klaus Leven.
BUSINESS
February 9, 1996 | TYLER MARSHALL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Although seen more as a brief pause in growth than the onset of recession, an unexpected slowdown in Western Europe's bellwether economies has become the stuff of front-page headlines, heated debate and dire projections. In Germany, the government announced Thursday that the ranks of unemployed had soared past 4 million, the most since World War II. In France, the government announced tax breaks and the central bank slashed interest rates to a 25-year low in a bid to generate jobs.
NEWS
March 9, 1994 | MARJORIE MILLER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
German unemployment rose to a postwar record of 4.04 million in February, climbing toward the jobless levels that helped bring Nazi dictator Adolf Hitler to power in 1933. The Federal Labor Office announcement Tuesday of a 10.5% jobless rate bodes poorly for Chancellor Helmut Kohl and his center-right Christian Democratic Union in this year of 19 state and federal elections. The country will vote for a new Parliament and chancellor in October.
BUSINESS
February 9, 1994 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
The January figure marks a postwar record and approaches the dramatic levels last seen during the Weimar Republic that ushered in Nazi dictatorship. The Federal Labor Office said the unadjusted total was 4.03 million people unemployed, up from 3.69 million in December. German politicians and commentators in recent weeks have been drawing increasingly frequent parallels to the 5-million level of the 1930s that helped bring Adolf Hitler to power.
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