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SPORTS
October 6, 1997 | From Associated Press
Day after day, Gary Brown worked out at the YMCA, dreaming of getting back to the NFL--and of having the kind of game he had Sunday. Brown ran for 181 yards and a touchdown in 36 carries, and fill-in kicker Greg Davis made six field goals as the San Diego Chargers defeated the Oakland Raiders, 25-10. San Diego (3-3) smothered the league's top-rated offense as Oakland gained only 241 yards--13 on the ground.
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BUSINESS
October 15, 2011 | By Nathaniel Popper, Los Angeles Times
As anti-Wall Street protests crop up around the nation, many of the bankers and traders at the center of the storm are focused on a more immediate concern: keeping their jobs. The financial industry shed 8,000 jobs in September, and 10,000 more are expected to be cut by the end of 2012. JPMorgan Chase posted a 13% drop in revenue this week, and next week mighty Goldman Sachs Group is widely expected to say it lost money for the first time since the financial crisis. The woes the industry is facing now are in contrast to the success it experienced after the financial crisis — a success that helped stir up the current protests.
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BUSINESS
February 6, 1993 | STUART SILVERSTEIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The national unemployment rate is falling, and a parade of official reports suggest that the economy is improving. But don't try to persuade Juan Antonio Vasquez that the job market is looking up. Vasquez, 21, a strapping lifelong Southern Californian, has been looking for work since being laid off in June. Although he figures that he has contacted 200 employers, the former garment shop production manager still has no serious prospects. "In the private sector, it's pretty grim," he said.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 1, 2011 | SANDY BANKS
The Faith Dome at Crenshaw Christian Center was the perfect venue for Wednesday's For the People job fair initiative. It's not just that it holds 10,000 people -- and almost half of those seats were filled. It's that something more than logic and reason is required to stoke hope in times like these. The hopefuls began lining up along Vermont Avenue hours before the church doors opened for the job fair at 9 a.m. Men in pressed slacks and sports jackets, women with high heels peeking from their purses and flip-flops on their feet for standing.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 26, 1993
There are people in the unemployment line. Business is slow at my friend's service station. Taxes are still very high. Bank interest hasn't gone up. People are being laid off. Crime is still with us. How come? I thought we have a new President. GEORGE GARDNER North Hollywood
SPORTS
August 24, 1985
If Georgia Frontiere has the guts to let Eric Dickerson sit it out, the fans are behind her. It may make believers out of others who think they are God's gift to the sports world. Wait and see how many of his teammates run interference for him in the unemployment line. JOHN JENKINS Burbank
OPINION
March 5, 2009
Re " 'Class warfare' shots," Letters, March 3 A letter writer who runs a small business states that she will lay off staff in order to avoid paying what amounts to a 4.6% increase in her taxes on the $50,000 her family earns over the $250,000 limit. I can only assume that she is foggy on the details of President Obama's new tax code. Or perhaps she is lying. To put employees in the unemployment line, plus give up tens of thousands in net income because she might have to pay an additional $2,300 in taxes, is just stupid.
NEWS
September 21, 1990
I have never read (Joseph Bell's) column before, but I was glancing through the View section as I ate lunch at work. The opening paragraph, rather than the entire article, is what made me do a double-take. Bell's remark about today's woes in the world and the "world being taken over by homosexuals and dirty pictures and flag burners and all" was entirely out of line. I understand that this is a column and therefore an expression of opinion, and I do realize that Mr. Bell writes about Orange County life, but does he have to come across sounding like he writes a column for Soldier of Fortune?
ENTERTAINMENT
February 16, 1992
Welkos and Silverstein were just about right on the money (pun intended) with their article on the unemployment situation in the motion picture industry. However, regarding the quote from Menahem Golan, chairman of 21st Century Films, anyone in this business knows that Golan is no friend of labor. He said, 'If I did a $3- or $4-million picture there (Moscow), it would be like a $30- to $40-million picture here (the States). When you pay extras $60 to $100 a day here, you pay only $1 (a day)
BUSINESS
May 19, 1998 | CHRIS KRAUL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Miriam Costa was in no mood to talk economics as she waited in an unemployment line here this month, hoping to find work, as she has every week since losing her job with a construction company in March. The Brazilian government's latest efforts to tame the economy have produced just one effect she cares about: She's lost her job. So have 700,000 other Brazilians since austerity measures were imposed last October. Unemployment is now at a 14-year high.
OPINION
March 5, 2009
Re " 'Class warfare' shots," Letters, March 3 A letter writer who runs a small business states that she will lay off staff in order to avoid paying what amounts to a 4.6% increase in her taxes on the $50,000 her family earns over the $250,000 limit. I can only assume that she is foggy on the details of President Obama's new tax code. Or perhaps she is lying. To put employees in the unemployment line, plus give up tens of thousands in net income because she might have to pay an additional $2,300 in taxes, is just stupid.
SPORTS
June 3, 2000 | From Staff and Wire Reports
Deion Sanders has gone from a two-sport to a no-sport player. Sanders, who helped Dallas and San Francisco win Super Bowl titles, joined a list of name players who were cut by their teams on Friday because of the salary cap. The Cowboys cut Sanders, who gave up an aborted comeback attempt with the Cincinnati Reds earlier this season, and avoided the $23.5 million the cornerback would have been guaranteed had he been on their roster another day.
BUSINESS
May 19, 1998 | CHRIS KRAUL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Miriam Costa was in no mood to talk economics as she waited in an unemployment line here this month, hoping to find work, as she has every week since losing her job with a construction company in March. The Brazilian government's latest efforts to tame the economy have produced just one effect she cares about: She's lost her job. So have 700,000 other Brazilians since austerity measures were imposed last October. Unemployment is now at a 14-year high.
SPORTS
October 6, 1997 | From Associated Press
Day after day, Gary Brown worked out at the YMCA, dreaming of getting back to the NFL--and of having the kind of game he had Sunday. Brown ran for 181 yards and a touchdown in 36 carries, and fill-in kicker Greg Davis made six field goals as the San Diego Chargers defeated the Oakland Raiders, 25-10. San Diego (3-3) smothered the league's top-rated offense as Oakland gained only 241 yards--13 on the ground.
SPORTS
November 21, 1996 | CHRIS DUFRESNE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Hoop junkies, you'd better grab some bench. There's so much to catch up on since Kentucky cut down the nets last April it isn't even funny. Remember that tough-as-nails guard from Mississippi State, Marcus Bullard, the kid who led the Bulldogs to the Final Four last year? He's wearing a different number now. He's in jail. Ralph Underhill, who coached Wright State to a 356-162 record the last 18 seasons? He got fired last week, four days after he was charged with . . . shoplifting.
NEWS
February 22, 1993 | JONATHAN PETERSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Harold Holladay, a lifelong working man in a lifeless job market, can tell you right off what he thinks of President Clinton's plan to hike taxes. But the answer might seem surprising. After all, he only scratched out six months of work last year as a pipefitter. And most tax money, he feels, goes "down the tube" for things like studying how ketchup oozes its way out of a bottle. "I'll bite the bullet," said Holladay, 57, wearing a white-corduroy union cap. "I voted for the man.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 17, 1992 | AL MARTINEZ
The line reached from the counter to the door, a distance of maybe 30 feet, a snake-like column of people that twisted around a stand in the center of the room and then back again. There was no pushing or grumbling, only an orderly movement toward the counter itself and a low murmur of mixed conversations. The only sound that broke the surface of the murmur was the occasional shout of a child slicing upward through the subdued tones and then back again in a shower of delight.
NEWS
November 1, 1992 | JOHN NEEDHAM, This story was written by Times staff writer John Needham with reporting from staff writer Lily Dizon and correspondent Shelby Grad
In living rooms in Newport Beach and on factory floors in Anaheim, there is gloom. Jobs have gone, plants have closed, it takes forever to sell a house. The once unthinkable now seems possible--a Democratic winner in presidential balloting in Orange County. The last Democratic presidential candidate to carry Orange County was incumbent Franklin D. Roosevelt, in 1936.
BUSINESS
February 6, 1993 | STUART SILVERSTEIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The national unemployment rate is falling, and a parade of official reports suggest that the economy is improving. But don't try to persuade Juan Antonio Vasquez that the job market is looking up. Vasquez, 21, a strapping lifelong Southern Californian, has been looking for work since being laid off in June. Although he figures that he has contacted 200 employers, the former garment shop production manager still has no serious prospects. "In the private sector, it's pretty grim," he said.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 26, 1993
There are people in the unemployment line. Business is slow at my friend's service station. Taxes are still very high. Bank interest hasn't gone up. People are being laid off. Crime is still with us. How come? I thought we have a new President. GEORGE GARDNER North Hollywood
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