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Unemployment Los Angeles

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 5, 1989 | LAURIE BECKLUND, Times Staff Writer
The annual distribution of federal funds for the homeless unfairly favors suburban areas over inner cities and is partly responsible for cutting Los Angeles' share by $1 million to only $4 million this year, United Way officials charged Wednesday. The formula is inequitable, officials said, because it distributes funds according to unemployment statistics, which do not count so-called "discouraged workers" who have been unemployed 26 weeks or more.
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NEWS
February 24, 2001 | STUART SILVERSTEIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
California's unemployment rate dipped to its lowest level in more than three decades last month, an apparent show of economic strength that defied the nation's slowdown and the state's energy crunch. The jobless level fell to 4.5% in January, down from a revised 4.7% in December. Officials also announced Friday that California in 2000 gained more than half a million jobs, the best yearlong performance since 1978, according to the state's annual reassessment of employment figures.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 16, 1993 | CARLA RIVERA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A new study suggests that the impact of last spring's civil unrest on Los Angeles' Latino community continues to be underestimated by the city's political and civic leaders and warns that improving Latino economic well-being is essential to any rebuilding effort.
NEWS
August 20, 2000 | LEE ROMNEY and STUART SILVERSTEIN, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
At an intersection near downtown Compton that only three years ago was marked by vacant lots and prostitutes, the beginnings of a comeback have emerged. Today the corner of Wilmington Avenue and Compton Boulevard is home to a 37-unit condominium complex with a community center and playground. Twenty-eight single-family homes will soon rise from a litter-strewn parcel around the corner. An AutoZone store sprouted last summer.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 9, 1988 | BILL BOYARSKY, Times City-County Bureau Chief
Los Angeles Mayor Tom Bradley and other city officials filed suit Friday, accusing U.S. Labor Secretary Ann McLaughlin of lowering the unemployment count in what the mayor said was an election year ploy to make the Reagain Administration look good. He said Los Angeles would be a loser financially, too. Asked at a press conference if he thought the change in statistics gathering was prompted by 1988 politics, Bradley said that "is as sound a speculation as I have heard from anyone."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 13, 1992 | TRACEY KAPLAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The number of people on welfare is increasing more rapidly in the San Fernando Valley than anywhere else in Los Angeles County, the latest sign that urban problems have spilled over into the once-privileged suburbs. The number of people receiving welfare benefits countywide grew 29% between January, 1991, and June of this year, but the increase was 59% in the Valley, said Paul Fast, research director for the county Department of Public Social Services.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 3, 1994 | MYRON LEVIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A multibillion-dollar infusion of government earthquake relief and private insurance funds will fuel a temporary employment surge in the Los Angeles area, but the construction boomlet will soon wither, giving way to a small long-term job loss, according to a report Wednesday to the state Seismic Safety Commission.
BUSINESS
May 21, 1992 | CARLA LAZZARESCHI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Early estimates of riot-related job losses, once feared to have forced temporary layoffs of up to 40,000 Los Angeles workers and the permanent end to as many as 10,000 jobs, have been slashed in half. The improved picture of the riot's likely effect on the labor market is primarily due to the revised--and significantly lower--count of the number of buildings burned in the three days of rioting and looting.
NEWS
August 20, 2000 | LEE ROMNEY and STUART SILVERSTEIN, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
At an intersection near downtown Compton that only three years ago was marked by vacant lots and prostitutes, the beginnings of a comeback have emerged. Today the corner of Wilmington Avenue and Compton Boulevard is home to a 37-unit condominium complex with a community center and playground. Twenty-eight single-family homes will soon rise from a litter-strewn parcel around the corner. An AutoZone store sprouted last summer.
BUSINESS
July 10, 1990 | BRUCE HOROVITZ
When William M. Lane arrived in Los Angeles last month to take control of the West Coast operations of J. Walter Thompson, the mail started pouring in. This was not fan mail. It was mail from people hungry for work. "A lot of the time when I come into a new market, I get resumes from people who are looking to trade up," said Lane, an executive vice president who transfered from New York. But this time around, Lane found the situation troubling.
BUSINESS
January 25, 1997 | STUART SILVERSTEIN and PATRICE APODACA, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Last month's stormy weather temporarily slowed California's job gains, but December still appears to have capped the state's best year for employment growth since 1988, officials said Friday. California's jobless rate also showed improvement in December, edging down to 6.8% from a revised 7% the month before. The state, where unemployment through much of 1996 kept hitting lows not seen in five to six years, now boasts its best jobless rate since November 1990, when it also was 6.8%.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 1, 1994 | JILL BETTNER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Tiny Bernice Marcus, 64, and Rose Altmark, who admits only to being "over 60," looked out of place at the Canoga Park unemployment office Thursday. "Excuse me, we're here to apply for DUA. Which line is that?" Marcus asked a security guard, pulling herself up to her full height of maybe 5 feet. "I have no idea what DUA stands for," added Altmark, her equally diminutive friend of 30 years, "but it's because of the earthquake." Indeed, DUA stands for Disaster Unemployment Assistance, a U.S.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 3, 1994 | MYRON LEVIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A multibillion-dollar infusion of government earthquake relief and private insurance funds will fuel a temporary employment surge in the Los Angeles area, but the construction boomlet will soon wither, giving way to a small long-term job loss, according to a report Wednesday to the state Seismic Safety Commission.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 16, 1993 | CARLA RIVERA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A new study suggests that the impact of last spring's civil unrest on Los Angeles' Latino community continues to be underestimated by the city's political and civic leaders and warns that improving Latino economic well-being is essential to any rebuilding effort.
NEWS
November 18, 1992 | MICHAEL QUINTANILLA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
They've heard the spiel before: "Be on time. Be cheery. Be confident." For the 30 unemployed men and women gathered at First African Methodist Episcopal Church, com peting for two jobs with the Walt Disney Co., the pep talk is a painful reminder of the daily struggle they face to land work. Many have been jobless for more than a year. They've had to give up their homes and move in with relatives. Cars have been repossessed.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 13, 1992 | TRACEY KAPLAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The number of people on welfare is increasing more rapidly in the San Fernando Valley than anywhere else in Los Angeles County, the latest sign that urban problems have spilled over into the once-privileged suburbs. The number of people receiving welfare benefits countywide grew 29% between January, 1991, and June of this year, but the increase was 59% in the Valley, said Paul Fast, research director for the county Department of Public Social Services.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 8, 1992 | CARLA RIVERA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Florencio Ortiz had lived close to the edge of homelessness even before riot-induced flames leveled the little Central Avenue market where he worked part time sweeping floors. Without the modest income from the job, he is certain he will not be able to afford to keep the room he has been renting from a family in East Los Angeles. So he is preparing for his usual last resort: a beat-up Ford van that has served as home many times before.
NEWS
November 18, 1992 | MICHAEL QUINTANILLA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
They've heard the spiel before: "Be on time. Be cheery. Be confident." For the 30 unemployed men and women gathered at First African Methodist Episcopal Church, com peting for two jobs with the Walt Disney Co., the pep talk is a painful reminder of the daily struggle they face to land work. Many have been jobless for more than a year. They've had to give up their homes and move in with relatives. Cars have been repossessed.
BUSINESS
May 21, 1992 | CARLA LAZZARESCHI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Early estimates of riot-related job losses, once feared to have forced temporary layoffs of up to 40,000 Los Angeles workers and the permanent end to as many as 10,000 jobs, have been slashed in half. The improved picture of the riot's likely effect on the labor market is primarily due to the revised--and significantly lower--count of the number of buildings burned in the three days of rioting and looting.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 8, 1992 | CARLA RIVERA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Florencio Ortiz had lived close to the edge of homelessness even before riot-induced flames leveled the little Central Avenue market where he worked part time sweeping floors. Without the modest income from the job, he is certain he will not be able to afford to keep the room he has been renting from a family in East Los Angeles. So he is preparing for his usual last resort: a beat-up Ford van that has served as home many times before.
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