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Unemployment Maine

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NEWS
November 17, 1991 | DAVID LAMB, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Somewhere in the dark forests, or perhaps out beyond the whitecapped bays, winter waits, growling in the night, and Maine, vulnerable and apprehensive in this season of discontent, is hunkering down. With trees stripped bare of leaves and the smell of wood smoke in the frosty air, the monied summer colony has boarded up its coastal homes and headed south.
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OPINION
June 3, 2011 | By Robert B. Reich
Jobs are slowly coming back, but that's small comfort to more than 13 million Americans who remain unemployed. For every current job opening, four people are still looking for a job. Many others have given up even trying to find work. The American economy is trapped in a vicious cycle. Those who are unemployed can't afford to buy much more than bare necessities, while people who are working are getting skimpier paychecks. This means consumers don't have much purchasing power, which has made companies reluctant to hire more employees or raise the wages of those they have.
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NEWS
May 25, 1991 | SCOT J. PALTROW, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Facing the harbor, on a seedy section of Commercial Street notable for empty storefronts, People's Heritage Bank has opened what gloomy local brokers deride as a real estate "soup kitchen." Like other New England banks, People's Heritage has become the reluctant owner of acres of land and buildings. The bank has resorted to garage-sale tactics to unload its inventory of foreclosed condominiums, houses, office buildings and other properties.
NEWS
November 17, 1991 | DAVID LAMB, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Somewhere in the dark forests, or perhaps out beyond the whitecapped bays, winter waits, growling in the night, and Maine, vulnerable and apprehensive in this season of discontent, is hunkering down. With trees stripped bare of leaves and the smell of wood smoke in the frosty air, the monied summer colony has boarded up its coastal homes and headed south.
OPINION
June 3, 2011 | By Robert B. Reich
Jobs are slowly coming back, but that's small comfort to more than 13 million Americans who remain unemployed. For every current job opening, four people are still looking for a job. Many others have given up even trying to find work. The American economy is trapped in a vicious cycle. Those who are unemployed can't afford to buy much more than bare necessities, while people who are working are getting skimpier paychecks. This means consumers don't have much purchasing power, which has made companies reluctant to hire more employees or raise the wages of those they have.
NATIONAL
September 24, 2004 | Nick Anderson, Times Staff Writer
President Bush dashed to this central Maine city Thursday to challenge the Democratic grip on the northeastern state where his family often vacations -- or, at least, to position himself to snatch one of its four electoral votes. Bush's trip cast a spotlight on Maine's quirky presidential election system. Unlike 48 other states, Maine does not use a winner-take-all method to allot its votes in the electoral college.
NATIONAL
June 28, 2005 | Elizabeth Mehren, Times Staff Writer
Every day this time of year, Vicki Cisco and Herbert Moon leave home at dawn and take their 14-foot aluminum skiff to a nearby tidal flat. Starting when the tide is lowest, they squat in the mud for six hours, digging for clams with gloved hands and pitchforks adapted to serve as hoes. In a normal season, the couple bring in $300 to $400 a day, enough to see them through the harsh winter months.
NEWS
May 25, 1991 | SCOT J. PALTROW, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Facing the harbor, on a seedy section of Commercial Street notable for empty storefronts, People's Heritage Bank has opened what gloomy local brokers deride as a real estate "soup kitchen." Like other New England banks, People's Heritage has become the reluctant owner of acres of land and buildings. The bank has resorted to garage-sale tactics to unload its inventory of foreclosed condominiums, houses, office buildings and other properties.
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