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Unemployment Southern California

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BUSINESS
January 25, 1997 | PATRICE APODACA and STUART SILVERSTEIN, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Orange County's unemployment rate, continuing a trend that has turned the region into Southern California's hottest job market, narrowed to a tiny 3.1% in December. That's the lowest level of joblessness in the county since April 1990, prompting another round of bullish projections by economists. Only three other counties, all in Northern California's technology belt, had lower unemployment rates last month.
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BUSINESS
July 15, 2000 | STUART SILVERSTEIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Defying a downshift in the national economy, California gained 51,500 private-sector jobs in June, the biggest monthly increase in nearly two years. The strong private-sector growth, much of it in Los Angeles County, raised hopes among many analysts that California's expansion will maintain momentum even if the national economy continues slowing. At the same time, the employment report released Friday by state officials contained some downbeat news: The California jobless rate rose to 5.
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BUSINESS
January 2, 1991 | JESUS SANCHEZ, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Any notion that Southern California was recession proof disappeared in 1990 in the wake of rising unemployment, falling real estate values and virtually flat economic growth. Although there is some disagreement as to whether the region fell into a recession last year, economists do agree that Southerj California will experience a relatively mild and brief recession during the first half of 1991.
BUSINESS
January 25, 1997 | PATRICE APODACA and STUART SILVERSTEIN, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Orange County's unemployment rate, continuing a trend that has turned the region into Southern California's hottest job market, narrowed to a tiny 3.1% in December. That's the lowest level of joblessness in the county since April 1990, prompting another round of bullish projections by economists. Only three other counties, all in Northern California's technology belt, had lower unemployment rates last month.
BUSINESS
July 20, 1996 | DON LEE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In further evidence that California's economic recovery is steaming ahead, the state's jobless rate dropped for the third straight month in June to a 5 1/2-year low, as a broad spectrum of nonfarm employers added 32,800 jobs. The state's report Friday pegged unemployment at 7.1%, down from a revised 7.3% in May and 7.5% in April, blunting the latest concerns about technology companies and raising hopes of an imminent housing recovery.
BUSINESS
March 23, 1995 | Times Staff and Wire Reports
Southland Receives $18-Million Dislocated Worker Grant: The U.S. Labor Department award is to be used for training and re-employment services for jobless aerospace workers in the greater Los Angeles area, the agency said. It said the grant is the largest single dislocated-worker grant and that it will help about 5,000 people. The money will go to the South Bay Private Industry Council, which will administer the program.
NEWS
July 1, 1994 | MARLA CONE, TIMES ENVIRONMENTAL WRITER
The latest proposal for cleaning Southern California's smoggy skies could cost more than $5 billion annually and slow new employment by 63,000 jobs a year, posing slightly more of an economic burden than previous plans to curb the region's notorious air pollution, according to an economic analysis completed Thursday by air quality officials. Overall, achieving clean air would cost almost $1 per person in Los Angeles, Orange, Riverside and San Bernardino counties every day through 2010.
NEWS
July 1, 1994 | MARLA CONE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The latest proposal for cleaning Southern California's smoggy skies could cost more than $5 billion annually and slow new employment by 63,000 jobs a year, posing slightly more of an economic burden than previous plans to curb the region's notorious air pollution, according to an economic analysis completed Thursday by air quality officials. Overall, achieving clean air would cost almost $1 per person in Los Angeles, Orange, Riverside and San Bernardino counties every day through 2010.
BUSINESS
January 1, 1994 | JOHN O'DELL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Orange County's jobless rate for November dropped to 5.6% from October's 6.6% as 11,000 people were erased from the local labor force tally, in what a state analyst called a statistical glitch. The big drop is a result of the averaging method used to compute local unemployment figures each month and was repeated in nearly every county in California. "It's a one-month anomaly," said Eleanor Jordan, Orange County labor market analyst for the state Employment Development Department.
BUSINESS
November 22, 1994 | DON LEE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Reflecting Southern California's brightening employment picture, Orange County's jobless rate plunged by nearly a full percentage point in October to 5.1%, the lowest level in nearly three years and down sharply from 7% a year earlier, the state Employment Development Department reported Monday. Buoyed by gains in the services sector, Orange County's economy expanded by 4,800 payroll jobs last month from September, when the jobless rate was 6%.
BUSINESS
July 20, 1996 | DON LEE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In further evidence that California's economic recovery is steaming ahead, the state's jobless rate dropped for the third straight month in June to a 5 1/2-year low, as a broad spectrum of nonfarm employers added 32,800 jobs. The state's report Friday pegged unemployment at 7.1%, down from a revised 7.3% in May and 7.5% in April, blunting the latest concerns about technology companies and raising hopes of an imminent housing recovery.
BUSINESS
July 20, 1996 | DON LEE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Providing further evidence that California's economic recovery is steaming ahead, the state's jobless rate dropped for the third straight month in June to a 5 1/2-year low, as a broad spectrum of nonfarm employers added 32,800 jobs. The state's report Friday pegged unemployment at 7.1%, down from a revised 7.3% in May and 7.5% in April, blunting the latest concerns about technology companies and raising hopes that the turnaround in the housing market will continue.
BUSINESS
March 23, 1995 | Times Staff and Wire Reports
Southland Receives $18-Million Dislocated Worker Grant: The U.S. Labor Department award is to be used for training and re-employment services for jobless aerospace workers in the greater Los Angeles area, the agency said. It said the grant is the largest single dislocated-worker grant and that it will help about 5,000 people. The money will go to the South Bay Private Industry Council, which will administer the program.
BUSINESS
November 22, 1994 | DON LEE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Reflecting Southern California's brightening employment picture, Orange County's jobless rate plunged by nearly a full percentage point in October to 5.1%, the lowest level in nearly three years and down sharply from 7% a year earlier, the state Employment Development Department reported Monday. Buoyed by gains in the services sector, Orange County's economy expanded by 4,800 payroll jobs last month from September, when the jobless rate was 6%.
NEWS
July 1, 1994 | MARLA CONE, TIMES ENVIRONMENTAL WRITER
The latest proposal for cleaning Southern California's smoggy skies could cost more than $5 billion annually and slow new employment by 63,000 jobs a year, posing slightly more of an economic burden than previous plans to curb the region's notorious air pollution, according to an economic analysis completed Thursday by air quality officials. Overall, achieving clean air would cost almost $1 per person in Los Angeles, Orange, Riverside and San Bernardino counties every day through 2010.
NEWS
July 1, 1994 | MARLA CONE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The latest proposal for cleaning Southern California's smoggy skies could cost more than $5 billion annually and slow new employment by 63,000 jobs a year, posing slightly more of an economic burden than previous plans to curb the region's notorious air pollution, according to an economic analysis completed Thursday by air quality officials. Overall, achieving clean air would cost almost $1 per person in Los Angeles, Orange, Riverside and San Bernardino counties every day through 2010.
NEWS
March 6, 1993 | STUART SILVERSTEIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Despite the improving job picture nationally, California--and especially the Southland--continues to suffer from a stubborn economic slump, new employment figures released Friday show. The jobless rate in Los Angeles County, climbing for the third month in a row, returned to its recessionary high of 11.2% last month--up from 10.4% in January, the government reported. Meanwhile, unemployment statewide rose to 9.8% in February, up from 9.5% the month before.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 7, 1990 | STEVE PADILLA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A coalition of builders, manufacturers and labor unions charged Tuesday that a plan to clean Southern California skies will burden industry with costly and cumbersome regulations that could force at least 350,000 people out of work. The South Coast Air Quality Management District should crack down on smog-producing vehicles, the main source of the region's air pollution, rather than place unreasonable demands on industry, which accounts for one-third of the problem, said William T.
BUSINESS
January 1, 1994 | JOHN O'DELL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Orange County's jobless rate for November dropped to 5.6% from October's 6.6% as 11,000 people were erased from the local labor force tally, in what a state analyst called a statistical glitch. The big drop is a result of the averaging method used to compute local unemployment figures each month and was repeated in nearly every county in California. "It's a one-month anomaly," said Eleanor Jordan, Orange County labor market analyst for the state Employment Development Department.
NEWS
December 4, 1993 | MACK REED, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Thousands of long-term unemployed Southern Californians are growing angrier and more mentally ill each day their search for work fails, psychiatrists and job counselors say. None may be sick enough to vent the festering frustration at the world through the barrel of a gun, as Alan Winterbourne did at an Oxnard unemployment office Thursday. But the number, illness and fury of the region's long-term unemployed are growing dangerously as the recession drags on.
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