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July 12, 2012 | By David Ng
The list of World Heritage sites has grown following a recent meeting by UNESCO in St. Petersburg, Russia. The Art Newspaper reported Wednesday that UNESCO added 26 sites to the list for a total of 962 sites around the world. The Art Newspaper said 16 of the 26 new World Heritage sites are from outside North America and Europe. Among the new additions are the site of Xanadu, the capital of Kubla Khan's dynasty, in China and the city of Grand-Bassam in Côte d'Ivoire. One of the new sites added to the World Heritage in Danger list has already garnered some controversy -- the Church of the Nativity, in Bethlehem on what is believed to be the birthplace of Jesus.
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ENTERTAINMENT
April 24, 2014 | By Hector Tobar
A decade ago, as a foreign correspondent traveling through South America, I witnessed cellphone technology's march across the globe-- to a remote corner of the Peruvian Amazon, where even tricycle taxi drivers had them.   Now smartphone technology is completing its own conquest of the developing world. Handheld devices that allow you to browse the Web, or read a book, are now ubiquitous in South America, sub-Saharan Africa and the Indian subcontinent. This week, UNESCO reports on an unexpected consequence of the smartphone revolution: People with limited access to books are reading more, thanks to those tiny, portable screens.
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NEWS
August 12, 1991 | Reuters
The acting director of a UNESCO regional office in Amman was shot and killed by a driver for the office Sunday after the man burst into an office and started firing, officials said. Government sources said the director, Hamad Khawat of Sudan, was killed when the driver burst into a meeting of the U.N. organization. Khawat's secretary and another person were wounded. Other employees said the driver was apparently distraught because he feared he might lose his job.
TRAVEL
January 11, 2014
In October, we took a 16-day guided tour of the UNESCO sites in Morocco with Around Morocco Tours. Lahcen Boujouija provided door-to-door service, knowledgeable guides for big cities, and never let a question go unanswered. He guided us to restaurants where we felt as if we were getting royal treatment. The people were welcoming everywhere. The Atlas Mountains were breathtaking, and the monkeys entertaining. The hotels even on the edge of the desert were top-notch. Tour prices vary depending on days of travel.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 29, 1989
The Bush Administration and Congress are moving with glacial speed on the question of resuming membership in the United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization, UNESCO, which ignores the opportunity to accelerate reforms within the organization. Part of the problem may be financial. Some worry that the annual share of some $50 million would break a budget already so tight it is playing havoc with important basic programs. That is the worst of all reasons. If the United States cannot afford participation in international organizations, who can?
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 11, 1985
The British government had been left no acceptable alternative to quitting the U.N. Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization. In the year since the United States withdrew, no fundamental reforms had been implemented, and the same irresponsible leadership of Amadou-Mahtar M'Bow, the director general, had continued.
OPINION
October 24, 2011 | By Timothy E. Wirth
The Palestinian bid for statehood recognition by the United Nations is almost certain to be rejected if it is taken up by the Security Council. But as early as this week, the governing assembly of the United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization could grant the Palestinians membership in that organization. If this happens, as is widely expected, the United States would have to resign from UNESCO because of a 20-year-old law forbidding the payment of dues by the U.S. to any U.N. body that accepts Palestine as a member.
NEWS
February 16, 1985 | From Reuters
Prime Minister Yasuhiro Nakasone hinted Friday that Japan may withdraw from UNESCO unless it institutes major reforms. The United States has already pulled out over the issue of reforms. Nakasone, replying to a question in Parliament, said, "Japan does not want to pull out, but will have to make an extraordinary decision if it (UNESCO) fails to reform itself." Takaaki Kagawa, the Japanese delegate to the U.N.
WORLD
March 17, 2007 | From Times Wire Reports
The highest-ranking American at UNESCO has resigned before an audit of contracts that his office awarded. Peter Smith, former president of Cal State Monterey Bay, said opponents had thwarted his reform drive and even threatened to kill him. He joined the U.N. Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization in 2005 and was assistant director general for education.
WORLD
September 12, 2002 | From Times Wire Reports
The United States will rejoin UNESCO, 18 years after it left to protest alleged mismanagement and overly political policies, a diplomat at the United Nations said. President Bush is expected to make the announcement in his speech to the General Assembly today, the diplomat said. The U.N. Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization was created in 1946 to fight intolerance and racism. The U.S. pulled out in 1984, with then-Secretary of State George P.
NEWS
October 10, 2013 | By Mary Forgione, Daily Deal and Travel Blogger
Alexander the Great slept here -- and lived here too. The place is Macedonia, which was part of Greece in ancient times. Most recently, it has been working to raise its tourism profile after its break from the former Yugoslavia more than two decades ago. Tour company Macedonia Experience, based in the city of Skopje, is part of the effort to put the nation on the European tourism map. It offers many active and leisure trips around the country,...
ENTERTAINMENT
July 12, 2012 | By David Ng
The list of World Heritage sites has grown following a recent meeting by UNESCO in St. Petersburg, Russia. The Art Newspaper reported Wednesday that UNESCO added 26 sites to the list for a total of 962 sites around the world. The Art Newspaper said 16 of the 26 new World Heritage sites are from outside North America and Europe. Among the new additions are the site of Xanadu, the capital of Kubla Khan's dynasty, in China and the city of Grand-Bassam in Côte d'Ivoire. One of the new sites added to the World Heritage in Danger list has already garnered some controversy -- the Church of the Nativity, in Bethlehem on what is believed to be the birthplace of Jesus.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 25, 2012 | Chris Barton
Have you started your International Jazz Day shopping yet? A global collaboration among the United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization (UNESCO), Herbie Hancock and the Thelonious Monk Institute, the first International Jazz Day is scheduled for Monday. Envisioned as a day of education and performance, the celebration actually begins Friday with a concert in Paris that features jazz luminaries such as Hancock, Hugh Masekela and Terri Lyne Carrington. The day itself aims to deliver 24 hours of jazz around the world, including in Los Angeles with a jazz session at Herb Alpert's club Vibrato in Bel-Air on Monday night featuring a variety of local artists, including Anthony Wilson, Bob Sheppard and Peter Erskine.
TRAVEL
December 18, 2011 | By David Lamb, Special to the Los Angeles Times
Phileas Fogg went around the world in 80 days. I did it in 23. And I bet I visited more amazing sites than he - India's Taj Mahal, Easter Island, Tibet, Cambodia's Angkor Wat, the African plains, to name a few - all without having to endure the tramp steamers, bone-jarring trains and elephants that Fogg used in 1872. I traveled by private jet. The price of a seat, and all that went with it, was $64,950. The trip was sold by National Geographic Expeditions, which each year offers at least one and sometimes four around-the-world tours by private jet, a leased Boeing 757-200 that is configured with only 77 super-large and dreamily comfortable seats.
WORLD
November 11, 2011 | By Zaid al-Alayaa and Jeffrey Fleishman, Los Angeles Times
  The tanks, mortars and firefights rumbling and crackling through the ancient city of Sana are endangering not only Yemen's future but also its magnificent architectural past of intricately decorated earthen houses and slender brick towers. The old city, with its stealthy alleys and fortress walls, is one of the most striking visions in the Arab world, a bit of fairy tale in a harsh, despotically ruled land. But once-peaceful protests against President Ali Abdullah Saleh that have escalated to street battles involving tribes, government forces and mutinous soldiers are encroaching on the historic center, settled more than 2,500 years ago and named a World Heritage Site in 1986 by the United Nations.
WORLD
November 11, 2011 | By Edmund Sanders, Los Angeles Times
After gaining momentum with their successful bid to join UNESCO, Palestinians now seem uncertain about their next move to win full membership in the United Nations and frustrated with their progress. The Palestinians' U.N. application was discussed Friday at the world body's Security Council, but no vote was taken. Divisions among council members - including a veto threat from the U.S. - make the application almost certain to fail. In recent days, Palestinian leaders have acknowledged privately that they don't even have the nine votes needed to forward the application to the U.N. General Assembly, meaning the Obama administration may not have to use its veto.
NEWS
June 25, 1992 | RONE TEMPEST, TIMES STAFF WRITER
After demonstrating a highly symbolic political shift away from past policies, financially troubled UNESCO on Wednesday concluded an emotional two-day conference here on anti-Semitism.
NEWS
October 11, 1989 | From Times staff and wire reports
UNESCO will reportedly defer for at least two years a decision on the Palestine Liberation Organization's application to join, sources at the U.N. cultural agency said. They said the application will be put off until UNESCO's next general conference in 1991 if a resolution from 11 countries, including Cuba and East Germany, is accepted. The U.N. Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization's 51-member executive board is to vote on the resolution today in Paris.
OPINION
November 4, 2011
Occupy this and that Re "Occupy L.A. gets two new canvases," Nov. 2 The protesters at Los Angeles City Hall want us to know how noble they are, yet they have: - Climbed to the top of a historic fountain to "meditate. " - Vandalized the historic fountain and memorial with chalk. The city had to build a fence to protect them. - Sprayed graffiti on the fences. - Held yoga classes in front of the fences. - Damaged the park at City Hall (though they love the environment)
OPINION
November 2, 2011
In past decades, Palestinian nationalists thought they had to hijack planes or blow up Israeli civilians in order to attract international attention. Some still do, but moderate leaders are lately discovering that the path to recognition might lie instead through the United Nations. On Monday, they won a key victory when Palestine — a state that doesn't technically exist — was granted membership in the U.N. Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization. That's giving the Obama administration fits and angering pro-Israel members of Congress from both U.S. political parties, but regardless of how one feels about the proper borders of Israel, the Palestinian switch to a diplomatic strategy represents progress.
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